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Old 02-09-2016, 05:19 PM   #1
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Electrical Flow - Missing Anything?

Hey everyone, I put together this flow that will outline my electrical needs. I still have to figure out the size of the generator, batteries, etc. but wanted to visualize the components needed. I'll basically be using the bus with shore power, but will sometimes use a generator.

Am I missing anything crucial? Any advice on particular products/materials I'd need?

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Old 02-09-2016, 10:03 PM   #2
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The INverter/charger should be a CONverter/charger unless you're using a standby inverter. The AC to DC converter and a battery charger are often integrated together into one unit.

I would run the shore power 30a line direct to the AC panel then wire the converter/charger to one of the panel breakers.

The DC to AC inverter will attach directly to the battery bank and to the AC breaker panel or to one or more dedicated AC circuits directly attached to the inverter. You don't want to create a situation where the AC circuits are being powered from both shore power AND the inverter at the same time.

Check out the Progressive Dynamics Intellipower integrated power panels. They have AC breakers, DC fuses, a converter and a 3 stage battery charger in one compact unit.

http://www.adventurerv.net/progressive-dynamics-intelipower-pd4045-amp-acdc-distribution-panel-p-22531.html
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Old 02-09-2016, 10:33 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
The INverter/charger should be a CONverter/charger unless you're using a standby inverter. The AC to DC converter and a battery charger are often integrated together into one unit.

I would run the shore power 30a line direct to the AC panel then wire the converter/charger to one of the panel breakers.

The DC to AC inverter will attach directly to the battery bank and to the AC breaker panel or to one or more dedicated AC circuits directly attached to the inverter. You don't want to create a situation where the AC circuits are being powered from both shore power AND the inverter at the same time.

Check out the Progressive Dynamics Intellipower integrated power panels. They have AC breakers, DC fuses, a converter and a 3 stage battery charger in one compact unit.

http://www.adventurerv.net/progressive-dynamics-intelipower-pd4045-amp-acdc-distribution-panel-p-22531.html
yup, what he said.
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Old 02-09-2016, 10:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
The INverter/charger should be a CONverter/charger unless you're using a standby inverter. The AC to DC converter and a battery charger are often integrated together into one unit.

I would run the shore power 30a line direct to the AC panel then wire the converter/charger to one of the panel breakers.

The DC to AC inverter will attach directly to the battery bank and to the AC breaker panel or to one or more dedicated AC circuits directly attached to the inverter. You don't want to create a situation where the AC circuits are being powered from both shore power AND the inverter at the same time.

Check out the Progressive Dynamics Intellipower integrated power panels. They have AC breakers, DC fuses, a converter and a 3 stage battery charger in one compact unit.

http://www.adventurerv.net/progressive-dynamics-intelipower-pd4045-amp-acdc-distribution-panel-p-22531.html
something like this, then? if i had the power panel, would i have to account for "The DC to AC inverter will attach directly to the battery bank and to the AC breaker panel"

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Old 02-09-2016, 11:24 PM   #5
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If you go with a standby inverter your original schematic is good to go. The standbys monitor the shore power connection and switch the AC panel breakers between shore power and battery power automatically.

If you go with the second schematic the easiest way is to have most AC circuits attached to the AC panel breakers and one or two other AC circuits attached to the inverter.

If you plan on having lots of AC loads, a big battery bank and a lot of inverter usage I'd go with the first schematic. If you'll be using mostly DC, either direct from a smaller battery bank or plugged in to shore power through the converter, the second plan will be simpler and cheaper.

Much depends on how you plan to use your bus.
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Old 02-10-2016, 08:27 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
If you go with a standby inverter your original schematic is good to go. The standbys monitor the shore power connection and switch the AC panel breakers between shore power and battery power automatically.

If you go with the second schematic the easiest way is to have most AC circuits attached to the AC panel breakers and one or two other AC circuits attached to the inverter.

If you plan on having lots of AC loads, a big battery bank and a lot of inverter usage I'd go with the first schematic. If you'll be using mostly DC, either direct from a smaller battery bank or plugged in to shore power through the converter, the second plan will be simpler and cheaper.

Much depends on how you plan to use your bus.
thanks! yeah, I thnk im leaning more towards the first schematic. in the case, do I simply make sure that the inverter/charger is standby inverter/charger? or is a standby inverter something that connects to tbe inverter/charger? any suggestions on inverter type/brand?
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Old 02-10-2016, 10:42 AM   #7
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thinking this one as the standby inverter/charger: Robot Check
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:59 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by iamjamesmartin View Post
thanks! yeah, I thnk im leaning more towards the first schematic. in the case, do I simply make sure that the inverter/charger is standby inverter/charger? or is a standby inverter something that connects to tbe inverter/charger? any suggestions on inverter type/brand?

The standby inverter/chargers that I've looked at all had an automatic transfer switch that monitors the shore power line and automatically switches to battery/inverter power when shore power is disconnected. Most manufacturers have downloadable manuals available on their websites so I usually get the manual before buying the product so I can verify that it actually does what I want it to do before firing up the credit card.

Be sure to add up your AC loads first (including startup loads for stuff with motors) then size the inverter and battery bank to match with a little head room. Big AC loads require a big inverter and a big battery bank attached by a big fat wire.

Here's a good article on inverters.

DIY Selecting an Inverter or Inverter Charger | West Marine
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Old 02-10-2016, 04:52 PM   #9
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Just my opinion and something I am doing for mine is that I want my house batteries completely seperate from the bus alternator/starting batteries that way I know that even if the house is drained I can always start up and go and if I have a problem with the house I know it's the house bank and if the bus don't start I only have the starting battery and associated parts to troubleshoot unless of course you add a second alternator/or have one already just for charging the house.
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:21 PM   #10
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Just my opinion and something I am doing for mine is that I want my house batteries completely seperate from the bus alternator/starting batteries that way I know that even if the house is drained I can always start up and go and if I have a problem with the house I know it's the house bank and if the bus don't start I only have the starting battery and associated parts to troubleshoot unless of course you add a second alternator/or have one already just for charging the house.
yes, that's a very good point. having the alternator/relay charge the house batteries sounds nice in theory but does certainly add some complexity in terms of hookup. it's something i'm still weighing the options of!
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