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Old 01-10-2018, 09:02 PM   #1
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Finding an installer to do my electric

Before I ask the second question here i will state my plain is rather simple, when i get the seats out i should load up the mini frig, computer, microwave, AC unit, and whatever I plan to use electricity wise on the bus to have that ready for the electric installation.

Ok, now when that's done,I plan to call, but does anyone know if places like Camping world or Rv dealers/service or individuals around Central Florida do this type of work on Sch bus. I guess a better way of asking this is (if someone like me prefers someone who knows what they are doing)

does anyone have any suggestions on anyone who has experience doing this electricity insulation on the bus and hooking the items up? I know I have heard of people in VA and SC that do but anyone around here in Central area of Fl ? I am in Daytona.

Should I consider places like camping world (if they do this) rv service centers, or electricians out of the phone book or any individual who is willing to assist that knows what they be doing? LOL, any suggestions?

I'd like to know how things have also worked out for others, seems so many people do it themselves but is there anyone else who needed to or relies on others for those talents? What's your experience or advice , how'd it work out for ya?

Thanks!
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Old 01-10-2018, 09:10 PM   #2
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I'm going to use the electrician I use when building homes. You'll want to have the floor plan laid out with tape on the floor and have an idea of where every light you want is going to go and a list of everything that needs electricity. I plan on flooring and framing and then all electric installed before finishing walls and ceiling.
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Old 01-11-2018, 05:04 PM   #3
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I'm planning to hire in as well. I don't know yet where to find someone to do it but I'm also going to have my ceiling floors and framework in first before I make the call and setup an appointment.



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Old 01-11-2018, 05:39 PM   #4
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Real licensed electricians know their shite and will do things that make it safe. If you make mistakes with your wiring you could end up with a big pile of ashes. I tend to want to avoid these issues and thus will pay the extra to have it done right. I mean these guys KNOW what wire to use and knowing what you can and can't do.
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Old 02-01-2018, 02:38 PM   #5
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OMG great question like I called camping world and they acted like I had two heads! Said to email them pictures and details when I was ready and they would see if it was something they could take on. Sounds like I need a regular electrician
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:00 PM   #6
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It has been my experience that typical (commercial/residential) licensed electricians are great at the household side of RV work, but totally lost when you throw in house batteries, complex charging systems and such. I have talked to several who had no clue what "hot skin" meant or how to avoid it. On the other hand, RV electrical experts who know all the systems are really hard to find. It is an area that is way easy to screw up.

I need to find someone myself as I am a total electro-dunce.
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:25 PM   #7
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I thought a hot skin was how you keep fingerprints off your nice paint job.
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:39 PM   #8
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I think I read on HandyBob Solar that RV electricians don't know jack about what they're doing and will usually use too small wires, causing voltage drop if you plan on using solar panels. RV's tend to have lots of fires don't they?

Also, solar panel electricians might do the same thing, because if you're having a voltage drop problem and you don't know it, you'll assume you need more solar panels right? Well they want you to buy more of course.

Look up "The RV Battery charging puzzle" By HandyBob Solar. It's a LONG read, it took me 5 hours of head spinning reading to finish it, but it was worth the read. A Laymen can probably understand it. Just something I think anyone doing RV/Skoolie solar should have to chew on.
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Old 02-01-2018, 04:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamWeaverBus View Post
I think I read on HandyBob Solar that RV electricians don't know jack about what they're doing and will usually use too small wires, causing voltage drop if you plan on using solar panels. RV's tend to have lots of fires don't they?

Also, solar panel electricians might do the same thing, because if you're having a voltage drop problem and you don't know it, you'll assume you need more solar panels right? Well they want you to buy more of course.

Look up "The RV Battery charging puzzle" By HandyBob Solar. It's a LONG read, it took me 5 hours of head spinning reading to finish it, but it was worth the read. A Laymen can probably understand it. Just something I think anyone doing RV/Skoolie solar should have to chew on.
That is an excellent piece of writing. Bob is a bit "shouty", but the information seems to be solid.

He is especially scathing of RV manufacturers who are still fitting 14.4V chargers to systems with FLA batteries, when the battery makers clearly state they need 14.8V to fully charge them, and can go as high as 15.3V with temperature monitoring.
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Old 02-01-2018, 07:15 PM   #10
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I would look for a good solar installer if not doing it myself.....They know 120 and 12v. Experienced in proper AC and DC wiring sizing. Know inverters and chargers. And understand batteries. AND most of us add solar to the mix any ways.
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