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Old 11-29-2018, 12:26 PM   #1
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Leese Neville question

My LN 12v 320amp 4890 Alt. Lists W AC / tp does that mean 120ac plug
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Old 11-29-2018, 12:32 PM   #2
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please use whole words

if you are asking about mains power, no.

Alternators output DC.

You need an inverter to turn that into AC mains-type current, usually with a battery bank in between,
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Old 11-29-2018, 12:39 PM   #3
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On the paper

That is how it was listed on the paper work if I knew what it stood for I wouldnít have to ask
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Old 11-29-2018, 01:07 PM   #4
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The alternator produces AC current which is rectified to DC and regulated to the correct output voltage. it does not produce usable AC current, you'll need to use an inverter for that.
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Old 11-29-2018, 01:08 PM   #5
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No I meant what it is you're asking, what you're trying to accomplish.

As far as the specs sheet or whatever, post a link to it if you want help deciphering.

Unless my answer was sufficient for you of course then never mind, happy to help.
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Old 11-29-2018, 01:16 PM   #6
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I would also add that that is a VERY nice, VERY expensive alternator. In other words, do NOT mess with it because when you break it you'll be extremely sad.
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Old 11-29-2018, 01:19 PM   #7
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from what i remember of those big alternatrors.. they simply bring the AC voltage out to terminals on it.. I was thinking it is actually "3 phase".. then they connect the internal regulator to thjos terminals... I have no idea what use that AC voltage is other than being rectified and regulated to DC.. since the rotational speed changes, its frequency would change.. which is a no-no for standard house-type current.



I think they sold those units like that so someone could install an external 24 volt regulator and draw 24 volts DC and 12 volts DC off the same alternator...



-Christopher
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Old 11-29-2018, 01:23 PM   #8
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Also be aware will require special pulley ratio / very HD multi-vee belts, and eat a **lot** of horsepower when loads are pulling anywhere over 200A.

A quality external VR like Balmar MC-214 and excellent cooling airflow also helpful.

Otherwise, or even so, do not expect to get that max rating in actual output for long.

Especially with a big LFP bank, or loads like aircon, would be very easy to fry the alt.

A field current killswitch at the helm will be useful for overtaking or in the mountains.
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Old 11-29-2018, 07:34 PM   #9
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The reference to w/ AC in the alternator specs could refer to the vehicle having air conditioning which changes the mounting scenario for the alternator.

As others already pointed out, alternators create 3-phase AC current that is internally rectified to DC. Aside from the AC side being three phase, the voltage and frequency is also not suitable for your AC appliances. Furthermore, the internal AC frequency is rpm dependent. Some tachometers use this to display engine rpm and some alternators have a connector for the tachometer signal, which is another possibility of what your alternator specs could refer to.

Sadly, we have to go from an alternator (mechanical->AC->DC) via an inverter (DC->AC) to our AC appliances.
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Old 11-29-2018, 07:56 PM   #10
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these larger leese neville alternators actually often have 3 AC terminals on the outside of the alternator... you'll usually see the wires connected to them that go off to the internal DC regulator that feets the Output terminal.. these are internally excited units.. so my thinking is that you could attach an external regulator to these 3 AC terminals (they are marked AC on the alternator).. say if you needed 24 volts for something.. some pf the larger transit busses have both 12 and 24 volt systems in them..... with an alternator like this you could draw both voltages from one alternator..

-Christopher
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