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Old 08-06-2018, 08:30 PM   #1
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Made diagram for Solar/Gen/Shore E350 Van config, can you look this over?

Building an E350 Van and about to begin the power system wiring. Here's what I have:



Windy Nation 200w (2 panels)

P20L charge controller (PWM)

Intend to buy 200ah approx



Generator is a Briggs/Stratton 2200w



Shore power outlet on the van



Basic scheme I am thinking is





Questions I have:



1. Generator doesn't have a hardwired AC output, just two plugs that are 20amps each. The A/C runs fine on the one, but how do I run both to the transfer switch? A/C is the soft start very efficient fridgidaire but...figured I'd spread loads to the other plug that is 20a.



2. Is 2 6v 200a batteries in series better than 2 12v 100a batteries in parallel? I intend to wire the panels in parallel.



3. Any suggestions or am I jackin this whole deal up?
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:37 PM   #2
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I dont see any dc breaker or fuses.

And you may want a battery cutoff switch (or possibly use breaker mentioned above)

Do you want the ability to connect your house batteries to your alternator. That another relay and more battery wiring.
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:39 PM   #3
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Also what is your plan for dc converter to charge batteries when hooked to shore power?
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:22 AM   #4
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1. Due to expediency I didn't show the fuses on the solar side. I'd install per the WindyNation instructions...I believe there is one between the cc and between the inverter if I recall.

2. Why would I want a battery cutoff, to avoid drainage?

3. I'd thought briefly about the shore and alternator charging options, but felt like I'd try to maintain some realm of simplicity. I don't have a "converter" and really didn't want to upgrade equipment at this time. I think the alternator is fairly simple with an isolator from the main battery to the solar batteries, correct?
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Old 08-07-2018, 05:37 AM   #5
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Looks pretty good RC000E!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RC000E View Post
1. Generator doesn't have a hardwired AC output, just two plugs that are 20amps each. The A/C runs fine on the one, but how do I run both to the transfer switch?
A small generator like that can only produce 20 amps. I'd expect that the multiple sockets split the load (max of 20 amps between them). So, only need to plug into one of them. However; please confirm that as it's a guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RC000E View Post
2. Is 2 6v 200a batteries in series better than 2 12v 100a batteries in parallel? I intend to wire the panels in parallel.
6V batteries are far better for "house/RV" use than 12V. There are many good articles that explain the difference between a starting battery and a house battery. Don't be confused by the "deep cycle" term - most of them are not compared to a 6V battery.

Also note that your inverter is massively oversized for a small battery bank like this.

Charging 'house' batteries from alternator is more complicated that connecting to the alternator. That's a good way to destroy your house batteries. You need a charger that is smart and will charge intelligently (like this).

Toss a breaker/fuse between the panels and charge controller and again between charge controller and battery bank. This is 'safer' but also makes maintenance much easier.

In my opinion (certainly arguable), if the length of wire between the two transfer switches is short (a couple feet), the breaker is not necessary. This breaker is often used to de-power the system (even though a breaker/fuse is really there to protect the wire), since you can easily disconnect shore power/generator that task is pretty easy to accomplish without the breaker. That said, it is certainly not a bad thing to have in place.

With the inverter on, there should be no power flowing TO your shore/generator power cord. However; do test that to confirm since it would seem you will have a male end on that cable/cord. That is a recipe for serious injury/death.
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Old 08-07-2018, 08:48 AM   #6
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You're generator is only going to make 2200 watts. That's less then 20 amps at 120v . I wouldn't worry about utilizing the other plug to try to split loads.

If I did anything, I'd try and find a way to convert the generator to using twist lock cables so that they don't vibrate out while running.

Not sure what plug you plan on using for shore/gen power, but I would make it so that it is one single plug for both. When you do that, you can eliminate your top transfer switch and breaker, because both the generator and any shore power you plug into should already have some sort of breaker on them.

Make sure that whatever auto transfer switch you use between the inverter and shore power shuts off power to the other device. You definitely don't want either source backfeeding the other when not in use.

I'm no expert on solar or boondocking on batteries, But I think you're dc/solar setup is way too small if you plan on powering an ac unit off of it.
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Old 08-09-2018, 12:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDOnTheGo View Post
Looks pretty good RC000E!



A small generator like that can only produce 20 amps. I'd expect that the multiple sockets split the load (max of 20 amps between them). So, only need to plug into one of them. However; please confirm that as it's a guess.

Yeah, after I read you posted this, I feel you're definitely right...no way that gen does 40amps. Definitely is 20amp, so that got me thinking last night, which coincides exactly with what the other member posted below actually.


Also note that your inverter is massively oversized for a small battery bank like this.

It's the inverter Windy River supplies with that system, I'm just using what I was given...figured I could grow the system into it.


Toss a breaker/fuse between the panels and charge controller and again between charge controller and battery bank. This is 'safer' but also makes maintenance much easier.

I hadn't added those in the diagram but, the system included those..noted

.
See above in bold and below response
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Old 08-09-2018, 12:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
You're generator is only going to make 2200 watts. That's less then 20 amps at 120v . I wouldn't worry about utilizing the other plug to try to split loads.

Agreed, that's what was mentioned above, so it led me to thinking pretty much what you had posted below

If I did anything, I'd try and find a way to convert the generator to using twist lock cables so that they don't vibrate out while running.

I'll look into that

Not sure what plug you plan on using for shore/gen power, but I would make it so that it is one single plug for both. When you do that, you can eliminate your top transfer switch and breaker, because both the generator and any shore power you plug into should already have some sort of breaker on them.

Make sure that whatever auto transfer switch you use between the inverter and shore power shuts off power to the other device. You definitely don't want either source backfeeding the other when not in use.

I assumed (possibly falsely) that it'd interrupt the circuit not in use, but I will definitely check that. I thought transfer switches were to insure when the genset/shore kicked in it didn't backfeed, such as in a house backfeeding to the pole would

I'm no expert on solar or boondocking on batteries, But I think you're dc/solar setup is way too small if you plan on powering an ac unit off of it.

Definitely not trying to run a/c off the solar. Genset was purchased for that sole purpose

Once I'd thought about it, I think my approach will be to have the external shore power plug on the side of the van, and make a chord that goes from the generator to that location (twist lock). That way, I'm either plugging in the generator or the shore power pole at a "koa" or similar. This eliminates the first transfer switch. So, essentially the transfer switch will choose between solar, with a priority for generator/shore fed power.
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