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Old 08-07-2016, 07:55 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by superdave View Post
if you put the w h on the wall between the shower and kitchen there wont be any waisted water and no need for a solenoid. keep it simple people
Absolutely. Generally, simple solutions are best. The only question then becomes venting the w h itself. I suppose the w h could be mounted on the outside wall, right at kitchen sink/shower "room separation" and vented directly out the side, instead of taking vent out the roof. That would leave the only "long run" to the bathroom sink.

In regards to the EccoTemp L10, does anyone know what diameter the stainless "Rain Cap" is? I can't find the spec on the website or in the manual. The other option is to spring the extra $40 for the FVL12-LP, which is designed for indoor use and includes a stainless vent kit. It also allows for more precise control over both temperature and flow settings. Downsides? The FVL12 uses 120V for control/fan power. It would put a 2W ghost load on the electrical system while idle and pull 1A during use. This is opposed to the 2 D-cell operation of L5/L10 models. It also appears to have greater demands for the water pump.
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Old 08-07-2016, 10:12 AM   #32
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The EccoTemp L7 apparently has a 3" OD vent.
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Old 08-07-2016, 11:13 AM   #33
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Superdave, I agree that you would be better off with a short run but what you propose still requires a good bit of wasted water before hot water arrives at the spigot.

BF is right about placing the solenoid valve at the end of the hot water line. Mine is actually right on the tank where the return line enters. Also, design your hot water distribution system so that the branches that go from the main pipe to the spigot are as short as possible (inches not feet) as this will help reduce waste. Jack
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Old 08-07-2016, 01:38 PM   #34
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Thank you busfiend for answering my question and thank you Jack for confirming it. I feel silly to not have thought of that and it makes a lot of sense. I'm glad you put the FVL12 on the map, it didn't occur to me but I would much rather use 120V (solar rechargeable) than Disposable cell batteries.
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:19 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
That resembles the water and ice solenoids on refrigerators with water & ice in the door....
If it is... Many appliance repair shops could salvage you one! But, we are only talking about $7.00
That's lunch for a day for me though!
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:23 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
Think of the tank and vent like this.
The tank is full of air so when you start putting water or waste in a 50-gallon(for example) you will only be able to get about 30 gallons into the tank because you are compressing the trapped air and it will create a back pressure that will stop the tank from accepting the full capacity of water/waste. A vent on a tank serves two purposes one for filling as described and for draining cause if the tank can't breathe/intake air when draining you will start getting a chugging effect like you experience when trying to pour water out of a milk jug,old style gas can or bucket with a pour spout and you will be at the dump station 3x as long waiting on your tank to drain.
The expansion tank is always a good idea in my mind but think about it like this?
Another name for an expansion type tank is a bladder type storage tank.
For example installed in this manner
If pump pressure is 65psi with a expansion/storage tank inline the pump will pressurize the storage/expansion tank (an extra 5-10 gal.) with a PRV(pressure reducing valve) installed downstream of the tank set at 50 psi.
Now the pump has to only pressurize the tank and your system feeds off of the extra 5-10 gallons of higher pressured storage.
Therefore your pump will only run full time when you are taking a long shower/tub or running a water spigot
Add an expansion/bladder type storage tank and save your pump some life and you won't have to hear everytime you get a cup and f water or fill the sink.
Just my opinion and some food for thought.

You would never believe how little vacuum it takes to suck in the interior wall of a double walled, non-baffled 4500 gallon milk tanker.... It kinda shocked me!


It didn't shock my boss.... It pissed him off!
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:28 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by BusFiend View Post
Absolutely. Generally, simple solutions are best. The only question then becomes venting the w h itself. I suppose the w h could be mounted on the outside wall, right at kitchen sink/shower "room separation" and vented directly out the side, instead of taking vent out the roof. That would leave the only "long run" to the bathroom sink.

In regards to the EccoTemp L10, does anyone know what diameter the stainless "Rain Cap" is? I can't find the spec on the website or in the manual. The other option is to spring the extra $40 for the FVL12-LP, which is designed for indoor use and includes a stainless vent kit. It also allows for more precise control over both temperature and flow settings. Downsides? The FVL12 uses 120V for control/fan power. It would put a 2W ghost load on the electrical system while idle and pull 1A during use. This is opposed to the 2 D-cell operation of L5/L10 models. It also appears to have greater demands for the water pump.
If I had it to do over again... I'd have gone to the L10, but not knowing how well either one would work for me, I went the less expensive route.
The drawback for the FVL12-LP is they required 110v needed.
I couldn't be happier with Eccotemp's L5 performance, and it guarantees I'll upgrade when needed.
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:34 PM   #38
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Ok are all of you talking about your hot water return going to your fresh water tank?
It looks like it by the schematics? It will work great for the hot water storage and hot water supply but you won't get any cold water.
The diagrams shown show no dedicated hot water return line or dedicated pump?
Is my commercial experience making me stupid to what y'all are proposing?
A hot water return system has a pump that draws (regardless of placement after/from)the farthest fixture away from the heater and dumps into the cold water inlet of the water heater which tempers the cold water into the heater. Whatever it is?
Sorry jack? I ain't understanding the valve placement or its purpose without a pump to circulate the hot water itself back to the heater/storage tank?
Please help me understand the idea
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:34 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusFiend View Post
Downsides? The FVL12 uses 120V for control/fan power. It would put a 2W ghost load on the electrical system while idle and pull 1A during use. This is opposed to the 2 D-cell operation of L5/L10 models. It also appears to have greater demands for the water pump.

Put the switch on a dial timer like they do for hot tubs. Or is it supplying voltage for memory settings?
I haven't looked at it close enough
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Old 08-07-2016, 04:31 PM   #40
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Put the switch on a dial timer like they do for hot tubs. Or is it supplying voltage for memory settings?
I haven't looked at it close enough
The controls are digital. I assume that means the 120V is also for settings/memory.
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