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Old 04-09-2018, 04:04 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: League City, Texas
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Ecotemp and similar WH install question...

Looking at the build thread for SanFord the Great (Awesome buiild, or rebuild BTW...) and I see an Ecotemp, I believe it is an L5 being used mounted, in a sheet metal pan remote from where the hot water is needed, plumbed with what looks like Pex....

The only camping water heaters I am familiar with are the Coleman and Zodi type that require you ignite the heater with a piezo igniter manually after the water gets flowing. I can't see any way to do that here...

How does the EcoTemp or similar heater work? Do they self ignite once the water starts flowing? Do they need an eletrical connection to make it all work?
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:26 PM   #2
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Yes, they auto-ignite when the water flows.

They don't all need an electrical connection, some have battery ignitors (which will always be flat when you need them
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:59 AM   #3
Skoolie
 
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Awesome. Thanks. That's not quite clear. That pushes the decision button for me. The Zodi gets retired, and an Ecotemp gets put into the mix....

I am assuming the plumbing circuit would go...

Freshwater tank --> Line out --> 12v water pump --> tee --> cold water line continues to faucet(s) and toilet if flush toilet desired. Hot water side runs into the WH --> Hot water out to the faucet(s).

Then, I need to figure out the drain system to get to the gray and black tanks, I mean do these use P traps or what keeps the stink where it belongs?
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Old 04-10-2018, 09:19 AM   #4
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: SW New Hampshire
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If you look at the lower rear of a toilet(at least a house toilet) you will see that there is essentially a p-trap molded in. And that's all that goes to a black tank. The venting on a black tank is to let air out when new black arrives. On the gray side, you have sinks and optionally a shower. They should each have a p-trap to them. I assume that the gray tank also needs a vent?

There is a cool device designed to replace a trap that consists of a short length of flexible hose, one end of which is molded to stay flat, like a pair of closed lips. The other end is a standard plumbing fitting and screws into the system where the trap would go. It sits inside the first few inches of waste piping and acts as a one way valve, allowing liquids to flow down through it but blocking anything from coming upwards. Someone will chime in with the proper name of this, I hope.
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Old 04-10-2018, 09:21 AM   #5
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You can use P-traps like standard household plumbing but there is a waterless unit called a Hepvo that works very well in RV situations. Also takes up less room. One problem with RV P-traps is simply that the water seal gets sloshed away or the unit sits unused long enough for it to evaporate. Either way...the smell comes through. This is what I'm using...

Hepvo Waterless Valve
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:27 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Exactly what I was trying to describe, in my own inarticulate fashion. Thanks!
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Old 04-10-2018, 12:38 PM   #7
Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
You can use P-traps like standard household plumbing but there is a waterless unit called a Hepvo that works very well in RV situations. Also takes up less room. One problem with RV P-traps is simply that the water seal gets sloshed away or the unit sits unused long enough for it to evaporate. Either way...the smell comes through. This is what I'm using...

Hepvo Waterless Valve
I notice they are U.K. produced. Do they come in U.S. inch sizes (1.5" kitchen / shower, or 1.25" lav drain?
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Old 04-10-2018, 02:55 PM   #8
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Yes they do.
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