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Old 05-19-2019, 01:17 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
The question becomes the maximum working water pressure household plumbing supports per building codes. If I come across 90 PSI I want 90 PSI in the shower. I might be using the wrong metric, is there a measurement that is the fluid equivalent of watts? Combining pressure / flow rate into one number or an equation?

Basically I want the maximum output of the tap I’m hooked upto coming into the shower, upto 150-200 PSI. Why settle for good when you can build amazing?
I do commercial piping for a living and if you want those types of water pressures in your plumbing system then you need hard copper pipe and fittings or galvanized steel. they will handle the vibrations longer than most other material.
but you need to look at the manufacturer specifics for each shower valve,bath sink faucet,kitchen sink faucet? most list a max pressure of around 65 PSI so a pressure reducing valve will save you some trouble of replacing new faucets.
industrial kitchen style faucets usually can handle up to about 90 psi but only fit kitchen style equipment but a PRV is still required to protect the fixture.
YOU could just build with a booster pump and pressurized storage tank with a PRV so the pump doesnt short cycle and then you have plenty of water but need to look at your water heater pressure rating?
almost sounds like you want a full kitchen scrubbery in your bus?
just my thoughts and opinion?
might be a hill of beans and might be a mountain for you.
I have over come the plumbing mountain but have been through to many hills of beans and everything else that goes with plumbing along the way.
pipe welder by trade but get handed crap pipe every now and then
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Old 05-20-2019, 05:39 AM   #12
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might be a hill of beans and might be a mountain for you.
That's what I was thinking as well. Plenty of good advice here and I have similar - built-in pressure regulator, 1/2" pex, accumulator tank, etc. and I have residential like flow to all faucets. I can't imagine why more is necessary. An abundance does not necessitate use. It might be worth finding/testing a few operating setups and see how the flow looks to you before spending time/money fixing a problem that doesn't exist.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:20 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
Basically I want the maximum output of the tap I’m hooked upto coming into the shower, upto 150-200 PSI. Why settle for good when you can build amazing?
A 200 psi shower???

I love strong water pressure as much as anyone, but that seems a bit... excessive.
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Old 05-24-2019, 01:14 AM   #14
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A 200 psi shower???

I love strong water pressure as much as anyone, but that seems a bit... excessive.
Not to mention ... owch!!!
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Old 05-24-2019, 01:48 AM   #15
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Not to mention ... owch!!!
what he ^ said!!!!!! :O
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:04 AM   #16
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Not sure I'd want a shower that doubles as a Hotsy! Good if you're seriously into exfoliation, tho.
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Old 05-24-2019, 10:40 AM   #17
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So if I’m understanding this correctly, if a tap is 90 psi through half inch, and my bus plumbing is all 1” PEX, with a garden hose inlet. 90 psi from a half inch pipe would be freed into a 1 inch pipe, same flow rate but lower pressure because the water has a larger channel.
The ultimate pressure in your 1" pipe is controlled by the OUTLET size, not the pipe size. If your 1" pipe just ends without a shower head (most have flow-limiters built into them now-a-days) then your pressure will drop. If you have a shower head then it won't matter so much the size of your pipe, so long as it is wider than the limiter's hole.


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I laugh at these misers who have unlimited tap water, yet set their flow to a dribble because they believe water is scarce and it’s morally wrong to use more than the bare minimum to get the job done, spending two hours to scrub 12 dishes & beating themselves up over a half a gallon.

Scarcity does not create abundance!
I have long frizzy hair. It will NOT get wet unless the pressure from the shower is high. If I shower at a friend's house and their shower head is a wide-area disperser with thin little streams, the water just flows off the top layer of hair and down my back; then my friend complains that I take 45 minute showers. My Aussie Sheppard had three-layer fur. She could walk all day in the rain, but her inner layer stayed dry. My scalp (where the sweat comes from) stays dry in a low-pressure shower like that, unless I spend lots of time working the water in with my fingers. And rinsing the shampoo? Forget it. Another 10 minutes.

When I travel, I bring my Leatherman into hotel rooms, and often remove the shower head altogether. If I'm in the desert, I turn off the water while washing. But I'm in and out in under 7 minutes.


Also, I would hate to have a 120psi, let alone a 200psi stream of water catch me in the eye or ear. 50-60psi is plenty enough pain for me.
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Old 05-24-2019, 10:50 AM   #18
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100 lb pressure through a half inch pipe fed into a 45 gal drum, then into another half inch pipe comes out as 100 lb pressure at the other end - reducing the size of the outlet would increase the pressure as it flows through the restricted opening
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:30 PM   #19
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I ask about copper pipe because it wont degrade over the decades, even with millions of thermal cycles.
Copper is about the worst thing you could do if you are worried about degradation—you won’t know anything about the water coming in on a hookup. The ph might be high, or low—no way to know without teatingbit every time. Do you plan on installing anything to treat the water? What with the anti-freeze do to the copper if you winterize it. 1/2” pex is the way to go—that will be the most stable material from a water quality standpoint.

It will also save a ton of money, and time. It is so easy to work with, I really don’t understand why anyone would bother with copper at this point. Any time I have to repair or add on to my home plumbing, I rip out all the copper in the area and replace it with pex. It takes less than a quarter of the time it would in copper.

That's my $.02.
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