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Old 11-05-2018, 10:31 PM   #1
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Toilet Composting with Worms? Vermicomposting

Has anyone tried this or considered this?

Iím strongly leaning this way, but it would be nice to know if anyone else has done this successfully while being mobile with your bus.

Like all things, there are challenges as well as benefits.

The expected benefits.
- much faster composting times-
- they will consume most organic things, exclusions: (animal proteins, dairy, citrus and limit the amount of urine they get)
-a great fertilizer-
- low to no smell- (hopefully)

The challenges.
-Keeping the temperature range right or else theyíll die.- (45 to 85 optimal)
- they need some monitoring, to be sure they can thrive-
- building a system that is easy to maintain and Empty-
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Old 11-06-2018, 12:11 AM   #2
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Old 11-11-2018, 11:21 PM   #3
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I hadn't considered worms, but I am thinking of getting one of those small size composting bins, just because I'm in the habit of composting green from the kitchen when I cook (or expired dairy and eggshells), and want to be able to grow greens and nip for the cats.

I'd say don't go with a standard plastic storage bin - that's what I have now, and the heat of the compost process warps it like crazy.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:37 AM   #4
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I ran across a lady, over on Permits.com, who did what you are describing.

It's been a while since I read about it. I do remember that she built two managably sized compost bins with the idea that when one filled up she could swap bins.

In practice, after many months of use, the first bin had not filled up yet.

IIRC: she use "redworms"
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Old 11-13-2018, 12:28 AM   #5
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Thanks Steve,
That’s good to know it has been done before successfully.
I’ll check out Permits.com to.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:51 AM   #6
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Darn auto-correct.

Www.permies.com

Not permits....
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Old 11-13-2018, 02:18 PM   #7
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I'm currently running a Nature's Head composting toilet on the bus ... I upgraded the fan so I don't get any backdraft driving down the road but other than that it's stock. Additionally, I run a separate vermicompost bin in the kitchen. I've never mixed the two but I would have tried it already if my fiance wasn't so adamaently against it. Something about pooping on top of a thousand worms freaks her out.

The cool thing about raising worms is that they'll breed in just a few months time and produce worm babies that are more suited to the environment. Survival of the fittest and all. So you can breed worms that can survive a lot of abuse. I know it's weird, but you might try using a compost toilet for awhile and testing the pH after it's nearly full to see if your waste acidity is neutral for the worms. Take a handful out of your composting bin, mix it with a little bit of water, and use a pool strip or an electronic pH tester. It would depend on your diet, I guess, but I've found the red wigglers in particular prefer a pretty neutral pH. I sometimes have problems when I add a lot of tomatoes, peppers, or coffee grinds to my vermicompost bin. I combat this by saving all of my egg shells (I go through easily 10 or 15 eggs a week), pulverize them and sprinkle the dust in every other feeding. We've probably got two or three thousand worms as of now. So ... if your waste is a little on the acidic side, consider saving eggshells to naturally add a little calcium or maybe even add a little lime every now and then. Also make sure you're diverting your urine completely as the little guys need oxygen to breathe.

Worms love ****. You just have to make sure you are providing the right
environment. (Think: am I comfortable at this temperature? Is my **** so acidic that it would burn my eyes? If you answered yes to either of those questions, your worms are uncomfortable.)

Hope I helped and vermicompost on.

To answer your question, it absolutely CAN be done. There are experimental vermicompost septic systems that you can view on Youtube, and EVERYTHING goes through there. Excrement, urine, soap, you name it. They survive.
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Old 11-13-2018, 02:30 PM   #8
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Not entirely on point but some relevant info: https://www.wormfarm.com.au/septic-tank-worms/
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