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Old 03-13-2015, 01:29 PM   #11
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Man, and I thought we were messed up with all the mixed measurements.

I'm a former auto mechanic, so I have to have both scales in all my tools. It's always nice to get a late 80s Chevy or GM, they could have SAE and metric bolts in the same component.
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Old 03-13-2015, 01:52 PM   #12
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I argued sae vs metric with some German friends once.
Two things that sae is almost universally used for are wheel sizes and fine machining measurements.
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Old 03-13-2015, 02:12 PM   #13
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Odd, wheel sizes may be SAE, but tire sizes are almost universally metric. That's messed up.


Well I guess they are actually mixed. the first number is metric, the second is a percentage and the third is SAE. Talk about mixed messages.
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Old 03-16-2015, 10:13 AM   #14
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Back to the original subject. If I can't find a premade tank to fit my plans, which I haven't yet, what are the pros and cons to aluminum vs stainless steal?
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Old 04-01-2015, 03:19 PM   #15
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It looks like this thread is dying. Let's bump it up.... I am interested in building holding tanks.

1. Plastic. Forget about DIY

2. Aluminum. You can weld it. The problem is urine will eat it....

3. Stainless. You can weld it. You can braze it.

I have a source to get 304 SS sheets fairly cheap. It is not 316 and this is bothering me. I was thinking about tig weld it using silicone bronze.

The reasons I want to build my own tank are:

1. I love building things myself.

2. I can utilize space much better.

3. I can make it any configuration I like

4. Price will be comparable to plastic ones sold on eBay.

We need some serious welders to give us more advice.

What do you think about 304 SS silicone bronze tig welded tank for black, grey water tanks?????
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Old 04-01-2015, 03:33 PM   #16
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Urine will not cause any issues in a aluminum black tank due to the dilution ratio. You would have to have a Urine only tank for this to become a issue. Even then, years would pass before you seen a issue.

Tig welding stainless steel needs no filler rod. We simply overlap the seam 1/8, and melt the two pieces flush.

The grade of stainless steel you mention is more than good enough. It will still last over 50 years before you see corrosion.

Cost wise, you will not beat the plastic ready made tanks.

Have you ever had to weld a water tight tank seam? Pin holes suck.

I might even be using plastic tanks for my fuel tanks. That's how much I hate leaks.

One last thing I want to mention is, look at the way most bus fuel tanks are made. The main part of the tank is one piece, bent with rounded corners. Only one seam to attach the ends of the sheet together. Then they weld in the end caps.

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Old 04-01-2015, 05:39 PM   #17
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I know I'm the "new guy" Skoolie-wise but as a long time camper I'd like to add another word for plastic: field repairability. Plastic repair kits are cheap, durable, and easy/fast to apply in the field with no special equipment.

Last year we got into a situation when rainwater washed out a gully across our campsite. I misjudged my clearance and dinged a rock with my black water tank - of all things to hit - and sprang a small leak. Laugh if you want, but it could as easily have been a rock on the highway thrown by a truck wheel.

Anyway, I jacked the camper up to get the liquid level away from the hole, dried it with a paper towel, threw on a patch, and it was ready to go in 5 minutes. The patch is still on there - I couldn't get it off with a chisel if I wanted to. All you need is the appropriate type of plastic (same as the tank) and the right solvent glue. Loctite even makes adhesives for PE and PP.

OK, maybe a metal tank would have been dented instead of punctured. Maybe. But there's something to be said about not having to empty something out before you can weld on it if you have a leak.

My 2c, FWIW.

Although I do love looking at Vlad's fab work, if you aren't a skilled welder I'd go with plastic.
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Old 04-01-2015, 06:32 PM   #18
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I used silicone bronze to TIG weld/braze sheet metal sections when I was raising the roof. I am not a pro welder especially when it comes to TIG.

It was so easy to control flow and fill gaps and dents here and there using silicon bronze. This is why I was thinking about using it when tig weld stainless tank.

My crawl space is 24" high and almost 8' wide. But there is a frame in the middle. This makes middle section not very useful.

I was thinking to fit tank between frame rails (24"Wx32"Lx24"H) and have the rest for storage. This would give me almost 80 gallon tank in almost useless space.

I can add another grey tank in next frame rail section which is even longer about 36" (almost 90 gall tank)

Also I can add connections I like where I like.

Here is a price:

I can see a bunch of 40 gall tanks on eBay at about 200 USD. Quality??? I have no idea, shape I don't like because they are almost flat...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RV-Holding-T...item19edb0c81d

I will pay just over 100 CAD (75 USD) for 4'x8'x 14 gage 304 stainless. Filler rod will be another few bucks and labour is free.


Grey tanks are different story I can see many of them "cube" shaped. I can even stack them and cascade connect them. This will be almost like a septic field...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/30-Gallon-P-...e390d4&vxp=mtr


When it comes to fixing the tank you can fix them all. metal cal be glued using epoxy or soldered/ brazed, ABS plastic solvent glued, PE plastic welded.


I am thinking about adding a Sewage Pump into tank but will think about it what pump type to use.



Hey just found this very educating video:



WOW COOL
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Old 04-01-2015, 06:54 PM   #19
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Nice, I like your thinking.

Nat
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Old 04-02-2015, 07:04 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taskswap View Post
I know I'm the "new guy" Skoolie-wise but as a long time camper I'd like to add another word for plastic: field repairability. Plastic repair kits are cheap, durable, and easy/fast to apply in the field with no special equipment.

Last year we got into a situation when rainwater washed out a gully across our campsite. I misjudged my clearance and dinged a rock with my black water tank - of all things to hit - and sprang a small leak. Laugh if you want, but it could as easily have been a rock on the highway thrown by a truck wheel.

Anyway, I jacked the camper up to get the liquid level away from the hole, dried it with a paper towel, threw on a patch, and it was ready to go in 5 minutes. The patch is still on there - I couldn't get it off with a chisel if I wanted to. All you need is the appropriate type of plastic (same as the tank) and the right solvent glue. Loctite even makes adhesives for PE and PP.

OK, maybe a metal tank would have been dented instead of punctured. Maybe. But there's something to be said about not having to empty something out before you can weld on it if you have a leak.

My 2c, FWIW.

Although I do love looking at Vlad's fab work, if you aren't a skilled welder I'd go with plastic.

JB weld or Metal Medic (loctite) or a myriad of other epoxy mixtures for metal will do the same thing for a metal puncture that you have described for plastic.
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