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Old 02-01-2018, 07:44 PM   #1
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Water plumbing

I have searched through the plumbing forum and trying to design our plumbing system... What I am curious of is how others have laid theirs out? I wanna grab some tanks for fresh water grey and black water behind rear axle... All water lines for shower sinks etc on driver's side.. can I run my plumbing as in a manufactured home?? Or any direction to some detailed plans of my predecessors as I'm.not trying to reinvent the wheel just fit it to our rig efficiently... Thanks to all!!!!
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:08 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by bman91 View Post
I have searched through the plumbing forum and trying to design our plumbing system... What I am curious of is how others have laid theirs out? I wanna grab some tanks for fresh water grey and black water behind rear axle... All water lines for shower sinks etc on driver's side.. can I run my plumbing as in a manufactured home??
This post may help:
Plumbing - Moving the Liquids - JdFinley.com

Unless you have some local rules/regulation with which you must comply, you can do pretty much anything you want. House/RV plumbing is typical - PEX tubing, PVC for drains, classic p-traps, etc. Finding a place, the right "fit" tank, and mounting them is usually the toughest job. You do have to consider the drains and keeping them running downhill.
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Old 02-10-2018, 03:59 PM   #3
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This post may help:
Plumbing - Moving the Liquids - JdFinley.com

Unless you have some local rules/regulation with which you must comply, you can do pretty much anything you want. House/RV plumbing is typical - PEX tubing, PVC for drains, classic p-traps, etc. Finding a place, the right "fit" tank, and mounting them is usually the toughest job. You do have to consider the drains and keeping them running downhill.

Since plumbing is something I haven't done too much in-depth Googling of just yet, in that link you posted the writer has a pressure accumulator in his system diagram. Is that something that is REQUIRED for reliability, or is that just a precautionary item?
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:07 PM   #4
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I would prefer to not have all that movable liquid weight hanging off the ass of my bus. My plan is to have most of the plumbing centralized in the bus with the tanks as near the drains as possible.
There's basically only 2 rules in residential plumbing, sh*t doesn't run uphill, and hot is always on the left. If you have a composite toilet, only one rule applies.

Was just watching the ARCA race and a Menards commercial came on promoting SiouxChief plumbing products, much of which could be used in our builds.

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Old 02-10-2018, 04:17 PM   #5
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I would prefer to not have all that movable liquid weight hanging off the ass of my bus. My plan is to have most of the plumbing centralized in the bus with the tanks as near the drains as possible.
There's basically only 2 rules in residential plumbing, sh*t doesn't run uphill, and hot is always on the left. If you have a composite toilet, only one rule applies.
Not to highjack the thread, but I'm assuming you mean having your tanks mounted between the axles for weight distribution purposes as well as to making plumbing lengths as short as practically applicable?
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:27 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Yuuyia_Takahashi View Post
Not to highjack the thread, but I'm assuming you mean having your tanks mounted between the axles for weight distribution purposes as well as to making plumbing lengths as short as practically applicable?
Exactly
No hijack, topic related.
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:29 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Yuuyia_Takahashi View Post
Since plumbing is something I haven't done too much in-depth Googling of just yet, in that link you posted the writer has a pressure accumulator in his system diagram. Is that something that is REQUIRED for reliability, or is that just a precautionary item?
The pressure accumulator is an affordable device that prevents the system "pulsing", and allows steady water-flow at the faucets.
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:39 PM   #8
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The pressure accumulator is an affordable device that prevents the system "pulsing", and allows steady water-flow at the faucets.
Ahhhh, gotcha. I'd assume it's a NVH consideration as well as a longevity thing? because I'd suspect that the pulsing isn't good for the pumps and equipment?
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:41 PM   #9
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Ahhhh, gotcha. I'd assume it's a NVH consideration as well as a longevity thing? because I'd suspect that the pulsing isn't good for the pumps and equipment?
I would think it helps the pump quite a lot. Also helps provide a steady flow of water through an instant heater.
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Old 02-10-2018, 04:48 PM   #10
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I would think it helps the pump quite a lot. Also helps provide a steady flow of water through an instant heater.
Got it! That was what I was thinking was pump longevity so that it doesn't accidentally cavitate, which would also harm a point-of-use heater.

Thanks.
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