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Old 05-19-2016, 10:54 PM   #21
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If your bus has air brakes, you could add an auxiliary air tank, and plum that air tank to your water tank if you were gonna go that route you would want to use a small pressure tank from a standard home well system or some other tank that has an interior bladder. Unless you like drinking water that tastes like compressor condensation
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Old 05-19-2016, 10:59 PM   #22
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If you're into Rube Goldberg sorts of things...
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Old 05-20-2016, 12:57 AM   #23
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Actually I like gas station rubber hose on a hot day water.
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Old 05-20-2016, 09:01 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Famousinternetjesus View Post
If your bus has air brakes, you could add an auxiliary air tank, and plum that air tank to your water tank if you were gonna go that route you would want to use a small pressure tank from a standard home well system or some other tank that has an interior bladder. Unless you like drinking water that tastes like compressor condensation
compressor condensation eats the rubber diaphragm quickly.
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Old 05-21-2016, 01:12 AM   #25
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You can pressurize your tanks if you use kegs, but you'd want to use the co2/nitrous mix to pressurize them. It's kind of a bonus deal if you like beer too.
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Old 05-21-2016, 06:50 AM   #26
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A foot pump plus a 12v pump seems entirely unnecessary to me. If you have a 12v pump then just use it. They don't use all that much electricity and there's no inherent water savings from using an electric pump vs a manual pump. It's all in how you use them. Don't leave the faucet open and running and you'll be golden. In addition, you can get a 12v pump for the same price as a foot pump, so there's not even an economical reason to choose a foot pump.



If you install a water pressure tank you'll be able to use the water for a while before the pump turns on to re-pressurize the system. Such a tank will also reduce water pulsing caused by the pump.
I installed one very similar to this:

2 Gal. Pressurized Well Tank


i went with accumulator as well, to save the pump. http://www.amazon.com/Jabsco-30573-0...ilpage_o04_s00
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Old 05-21-2016, 10:40 AM   #27
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You can pressurize your tanks if you use kegs, but you'd want to use the co2/nitrous mix to pressurize them. It's kind of a bonus deal if you like beer too.
Or even a manual hand cranked air pump would be even better to pressurize while we are making the point more complex for this person!

You asked what we thought about your idea. You got mixed opinions. Ultimately, it's your call.
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Old 05-21-2016, 01:19 PM   #28
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These are good. Maybe you just want a resivoir above sink height andus gravity flow.


Amazon.com: guzzler hand pump
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Old 05-21-2016, 02:47 PM   #29
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Or even a manual hand cranked air pump would be even better to pressurize while we are making the point more complex for this person!

You asked what we thought about your idea. You got mixed opinions. Ultimately, it's your call.
Don't think the air compressor idea is worth a dang but in the water world they are called expansion tanks and yes they do provide extra volume to a piping system to keep a pump from cycling off and on and on the cold water side of a hot water heater because dumping cold water into a hot water heater/vessel creates expansion and contraction into the system that the vessel was not designed for (not pushed as much in residential) but can and will help.
A 3-gallon bladder tank after the pump gives you an extra 2-gallons of pressurized water before the pump has to work and if your pump has a down line pressure switch to activate it then it for best production needs to be after the expansion tank.
The air pressure in the tank from the factory is normally set to 15-psi of air on the outside of the bladder in the tank and will need to be adjusted to your water pressure whether pumped or street/campground. I chose a happy medium with mine. My pump does 55 psi and normal street pressure is 50-60 not for some camp grounds so my pump is ready no matter the connection.
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Old 05-21-2016, 03:40 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
Or even a manual hand cranked air pump would be even better to pressurize while we are making the point more complex for this person!

You asked what we thought about your idea. You got mixed opinions. Ultimately, it's your call.
Dude, that's the point of being here on this forum. To get 20 different ways to do what you want to do.
Was it the beer idea that disgusted you? I like kegs. They're easy to move around for whatever you need and it's easy to charge them. The co2 mix bottle lasts a couple years and is cheap to refill. Considering how most skoolie owners drop $1k on many different projects, this is one of the cheap answers costing several hundred for a basic system depending on what you want or need. And besides, the other day we found that the co2 mix has antimicrobial properties thanks to other skoolie members.
I don't know why anyone would want to put the flavor of compressed air into their water.
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