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Old 08-20-2015, 10:29 AM   #31
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Year: 1994
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Neat but as opposed to flexible panels glued to the roof, a portable trolley could walk away.
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Old 08-20-2015, 11:05 AM   #32
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Location: Lexington sc
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It's looking as though my initial solution will be just to plug the bus in. The aim is to be operational as soon as possible. I still have plumbing go do.
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Old 08-20-2015, 11:54 AM   #33
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Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
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Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
Neat but as opposed to flexible panels glued to the roof, a portable trolley could walk away.
It sounds like you have made your mind up about the generator, and that's fine, but all these issues have solutions. I'll add these comments for future skoolie folks perusing the forums.

A portable solar unit can be made to fold to conserve space. It could also be locked to the exterior side wall of the bus so it doesn't grow legs and wander. Storage is the biggest issue.

I, personally, wouldn't want the glue-down solar panels. Since they would be glued to the curve of the roof they will never be at an optimal angle to the sun. Also, grid-tie solar panels (often at 36 volts) are far cheaper and typically built stronger than the 12v ones that can be found at hardware and RV/marine stores. I see plenty of 12v panels with plastic frames. Yuck. All grid-tie panels I've seen have strong aluminum frames with mounting holes. All you need is an MPPT charge controller to convert the voltage to 12v, 24v or 48v..

Here's my set up (alt. link). Page 7 shows them in the upright position for winter. Page 8 shows a picture of them folded down. I've had them down all summer, which is still a couple degrees of tilt, and they have been working great. I'll bring them up to around 45 in the autumn. When flat they are about 8 inches above the roof. I also live in the trees and have had many branches scraping along them with no issue. They are built really tough. You can walk on them (though I'd rather not ). Other than changing the tilt there has been zero maintenance, 100% silence, no oil/fuel mess and no exhaust.
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:13 PM   #34
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Jazty, you don't have a page 7 yet.
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:19 PM   #35
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Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazycal View Post
Jazty, you don't have a page 7 yet.
but but but... I'm looking at it right now!



I must be in some other Skoolie dimension..
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:27 PM   #36
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You must be cuz this is what I see.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg jaztypage7.jpg (147.4 KB, 6 views)
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:32 PM   #37
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
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Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
whoa.. what the hey-ho is going on there?!? That's page 16 in my view.
Calling all skoolie gods! We have an issue!
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:38 PM   #38
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I just figured it out. Even without my first cup-a-joe. I have it set to view 30 posts per page. Smarter then the average bear.
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:39 PM   #39
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
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Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
haha.. This is good to know. I didn't even realize there was an option for that.
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:40 PM   #40
Bus Nut
 
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Lexington sc
Posts: 482
Year: 1994
Coachwork: carpenter
Chassis: international
Engine: 466dt
Rated Cap: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
It sounds like you have made your mind up about the generator, and that's fine, but all these issues have solutions. I'll add these comments for future skoolie folks perusing the forums.

A portable solar unit can be made to fold to conserve space. It could also be locked to the exterior side wall of the bus so it doesn't grow legs and wander. Storage is the biggest issue.

I, personally, wouldn't want the glue-down solar panels. Since they would be glued to the curve of the roof they will never be at an optimal angle to the sun. Also, grid-tie solar panels (often at 36 volts) are far cheaper and typically built stronger than the 12v ones that can be found at hardware and RV/marine stores. I see plenty of 12v panels with plastic frames. Yuck. All grid-tie panels I've seen have strong aluminum frames with mounting holes. All you need is an MPPT charge controller to convert the voltage to 12v, 24v or 48v..

Here's my set up. Page 7 shows them in the upright position for winter. Page 8 shows a picture of them folded down. I've had them down all summer, which is still a couple degrees of tilt, and they have been working great. I'll bring them up to around 45 in the autumn. When flat they are about 8 inches above the roof. I also live in the trees and have had many branches scraping along them with no issue. They are built really tough. You can walk on them (though I'd rather not ). Other than changing the tilt there has been zero maintenance, 100% silence, no oil/fuel mess and no exhaust.
uploadfromtaptalk1440088757291.png

That's where the link takes me!
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