Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-08-2014, 02:22 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Massachusetts.
Posts: 147
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-t-liner
Engine: Cat 3126 - MD 3060
Rated Cap: 72
Any propane stove experts?

I got an old oven/range out of a camper. It's a maynell brand, it's a 3 burner slide in. It's about 21"x23"I don't know the model. But anyway I used the 3/8 copper tubing and I took the regulator (605h) but I got a new regulator. So I installed it and it lights up and works great but... The flame on the cooktop isn't much and won't boil water. All of the burners are the same height. Is it possible the previous owner had the wrong regulator in? I haven't put a thermometer in the oven to test the temp there. Also I don't even know what a typical regulator size would be. Any guidance would be great.
ThePimentals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 04:15 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
roach711's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Farmington Hills, Mi (Detroit area)
Posts: 1,572
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Eldorado Aerotech 24'
Chassis: Ford E-450 Cutaway Bus
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 19
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Some propane appliances have a regulator built in. If you have a two stage regulator at the tanks the appliance regulator may be knocking the pressure down too far for the burners to work properly. Not sure whether the appliance regulators can be removed. You may also have spider webs in the burner tubes or junk in the orifices. I bought a used water heater that had the spider web problem. The flame was a lazy orange and smoked a lot. Spiders suck. Since all burners have the same weak flame I would suspect two regulators are the problem.

The original installation may have had a split two-stage regulator setup - one high pressure regulator at the tank knocking the pressure down before going into the supply line, and another low pressure regulator at the appliance taking the pressure down again to what the appliance wants. Most RVs have an integrated two stage regulator at the tank/s so another on at the appliance isn't needed.

A full propane tank may be at 250 psi or more but the appliances needs a nice steady .5 psi.
__________________
The Roach Motel
roach711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 04:54 PM   #3
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Massachusetts.
Posts: 147
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-t-liner
Engine: Cat 3126 - MD 3060
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Im betting it has a built in regulator. That seems to be what's happening. It's like its just low on flow. No smoke or anything. Now I just need to figure out what the regulator looks like that would be attatched. Maybe I'll post some photos and someone can tell me if it has one. Thanks roach.
ThePimentals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 06:50 PM   #4
Bus Geek
 
lornaschinske's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Roswell, NM
Posts: 3,587
Year: 1986
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: 40 ft All American FE
Engine: 8.2LTA Fuel Pincher DD V8
Rated Cap: 89
Re: Any propane stove experts?

A search turned up a Meynell post similar to your problem...

http://repairingyesterdaystrailers.yuku ... F6rUcm0eB0
__________________
This post is my opinion. It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.
Fulltime since 2006
The goal of life is living in agreement with nature. Zeno (335BC-264BC)
http://lorndavi.wordpress.com/blog/
http://i570.photobucket.com/albums/s...ps0340a6ff.jpg
lornaschinske is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 07:22 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Massachusetts.
Posts: 147
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-t-liner
Engine: Cat 3126 - MD 3060
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Ok I found somethig on the back and when I googled it. It says it's a gas saftey valve. I don't know if that is a regulator. I also found a tag that says the range output is 4000 btu. Is that enough to boil water. Should I just toss this thing in the trash?
ThePimentals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 07:23 PM   #6
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Massachusetts.
Posts: 147
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-t-liner
Engine: Cat 3126 - MD 3060
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (1.29 MB, 189 views)
ThePimentals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 10:32 PM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
roach711's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Farmington Hills, Mi (Detroit area)
Posts: 1,572
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Eldorado Aerotech 24'
Chassis: Ford E-450 Cutaway Bus
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 19
Re: Any propane stove experts?

That's probably the safety gas shutoff valve for the oven. If it is, there should be a thermocouple with one end attached to the valve body and the other end going down to the oven pilot light. The pilot flame hitting the thermocouple generates a small voltage that opens the valve and lets propane flow. If the pilot flame gets blown out the gas valve closes to protect people and other living things.

A thermocouple is a thin copper tube with a larger copper bulb on the end at the pilot light. The dark tube attaching at the middle of the valve is probably your thermocouple.

4K BTUs should be enough to boil about three gallons of water.

One problem is that your supply pressure will need to be the same for all your propane appliances. All of mine (water heater, range and furnace) need .5 psi at the supply line. Having some wanting one pressure and another appliance wanting another will complicate your setup.
__________________
The Roach Motel
roach711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2014, 11:27 PM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Upstate NY (Mohawk Valley)
Posts: 1,096
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711
That's probably the safety gas shutoff valve for the oven.
X2 on that. But I would suspect the tube going to sense the pilot light, at least the one in the picture, uses mercury or another liquid to shut off the gas with a mechanical, not electrical action if the pilot goes cold.

Check around for stove burner specifications. I think our home stove has four 9000 BTU units. I have seen others which have a couple of really high output ones and a couple of medium output ones. Our burners are a little slow for canning or cooking big pots of soup, but even 4000 BTU should be usable for light cooking if you have the right regulator pressure setting.

Gas pressure at appliances is generally measured in water column inches, or how high the pressure can lift water in a tube. If I recall correctly, about 7 inches equals one PSI. A big generator uses 14" (2 psi) or less, I would expect the internal regulator on home appliances to be between 0.5 and 1.0 PSI previously stated.

Natural gas utilities tell me city gas pipes run about 70 PSI. Propane tank pressures run much higher. Propane boils into vapor at about -44, but remains liquid because the tank is sealed and the vapor pressure rises. It is just like a car or truck radiator pressure cap keeping water as liquid and not steam above 212F (100C) because it has nowhere to go. The pressure in a propane tank depends on the outside temperature, the rate vapor (if any) is being drawn from the tank, and the amount of liquid surface area that can boil off the needed vapor. The 250 PSI is likely sitting in the hot summer sun, an average tank pressure is probably half that on a day-to-day basis.

Two-stage schemes can be separate regulators, or an integrated two-chamber unit. My guess is that the integrated two-chamber unit is better able to give a steady appliance low pressure from a high pressure tank than trying to do it in a single chamber.

There is another scheme, where the regulator at the tank is set for a medium pressure, usually about 70" (10 PSI). This is higher than needed by the appliances, in order for the extra pressure to overcome the friction restricting flow in the supply pipes. The second regulator is placed at the point of use at the appliances.

The split system is great for standby generators, as it avoids fuel starvation from a pressure drop if the load suddenly increases. I have seen generators that start and run fine, and then choke and sputter if a heavy load comes on and the gas pressure can't recover. I would expect the same, but less dramatic, as a gas oven control cycles the burners on and off.

If the low-pressure regulator were back at the tank, it would take a while for it to see the drop and adjust the pressure to the line. But if there is medium pressure in the line 5 times what is required, the regulator at the point of use can quickly adjust to the need without having to change the pressure in the entire line.
__________________
Someone said "Making good decisions comes from experience, experience comes from bad decisions." I say there are three kinds of people: those who learn from their mistakes, those who learn from the mistakes of others, and those who never learn.
Redbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2014, 08:02 AM   #9
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Massachusetts.
Posts: 147
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-t-liner
Engine: Cat 3126 - MD 3060
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Any propane stove experts?

Before anyone else comments I'm waiting for a new 2 stage regulator. Hopefully it works good after that. Sorry I'm so dumb.
ThePimentals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2014, 04:06 PM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
roach711's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Farmington Hills, Mi (Detroit area)
Posts: 1,572
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Eldorado Aerotech 24'
Chassis: Ford E-450 Cutaway Bus
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 19
Re: Any propane stove experts?

The only dumb question is the one you don't ask. Three years ago I was a "bus conversion virgin" myself.

Everyone here is happy to pass along what we've learned. Soon you'll be jumping in with answers too.
__________________
The Roach Motel
roach711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to make a Wood Stove from a propane tank lornaschinske Everything Else | General Skoolie Discussions 7 01-21-2013 07:50 PM
To those of you with a wood stove in your bus ... wtd Heating, Cooling and Appliances 12 01-07-2012 12:17 PM
Wood Stove for Bus? Seeria Heating, Cooling and Appliances 0 12-15-2010 03:56 PM
electric stove? Mulelover Alternative Fuels | Electric, Propane, Wood Gasification, etc. 8 01-24-2010 09:45 AM
converting a natural gas stove to propane Disastrogirl Conversion General Discussions 2 06-13-2009 08:13 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.