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Old 06-10-2016, 12:27 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LooNeeBus View Post
Hello,
I'm in the process of removing the ceiling and siding to re insulate my 98 BlueBird. I've been researching all possible spray foam applications, DIY and Professional. I'd really like to do it ourselves since it will save us money. Did you Spray Foam yourself? I'm interested in s product called Foam it Green, I wonder if you've heard of it before? I also watched this interesting? show on spray foam nightmares where people had there attics spray foamed and it was causing them distress... I've read good and bad stories, just want to make sure we do the best job we can. Thank you for any thoughts you may have.
It will cost you roughly the same whether you do it yourself of have a pro do it. It is the quality of the finished product you need to worry about.

The mobile spray foam rigs the professionals use will typically set you back fifty to eighty thousand. This machinery heats, pressurizes and mixes the foam components. The result is a finished job of much higher quality than you can achieve using the do-it-yourself kits.

Then, there's cost. The kits cost about $1/board foot, and that is also about what the pro will bid to do the job. In a competitive market, a pro may be a bit lower priced. The big difference is who gets sweaty and messy in the process.

Fumes from spray foam are terribly toxic, but only on the day it is being applied. There is an intense chemical reaction when the two parts mix, but the heat and off-gassing tapers off steeply within a few minutes.

The fumes should be taken very seriously. You need supplied air to do this work safely inside an enclosed area like a bus - that is, air that is pumped to your mask from outside the work area.

Spray foam cures rapidly. You can cut and shave it less than an hour after it is sprayed, and you should, because this task will be much more difficult by the next morning when it is completely cured.

It should be obvious that when the foam has cooled and hardened, the chemical reaction has ended. After that - again, obviously - no more fumes are being produced. Unfortunately, a lot of folks don't understand chemistry, so there are persistent myths that spray foam insulation perpetually emits gases. It doesn't.

Remember, for insulating a skoolie, we're talking about 2 lb. closed cell foam. Besides having the highest R value per inch of any affordable insulation, there are four other reasons to choose it:

1) Structural strength - adhesion and tensile strength both exceed 30 PSI

2) Sound deadening - closed cell foam reduces resonances because of its strength and also reduces the transmission of low frequency sounds.

3) Vapor barrier - at two inches minimum thickness, closed cell foam is a complete vapor barrier. Properly applied to a good surface, it will prevent rust.

4) Mold prevention - this material does not support mold growth.

Hope this helps...
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Old 06-12-2016, 02:01 PM   #22
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Awesome! Thank You so much. You helped put my mind at ease and am going for it... Will post pics as everything unfolds
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Old 06-12-2016, 02:47 PM   #23
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I've already wintered over in Montana in a slightly modified 2003 Thomas HDX. I did install 1" double-face closed-foam on all sides, including the windshield. I did need a Mr. Heater to knock off the morning chill, but I got by on sweats and extra blankets. I haven't raised the roof, nor do I plan on it.
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Old 06-13-2016, 08:19 AM   #24
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Does anyone know if the all Americans by bluebird come with 78 inch headroom? If so, can properly insulate the one I'm looking at without a roof raise. Just sheet in Windows
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:59 PM   #25
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Bliebirdman, I am in the beginning stages of my conversion and your summary of cold climate considerations is fantastic. Thanks for the great info. Dan
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Old 06-20-2016, 01:50 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by JHands View Post
Does anyone know if the all Americans by bluebird come with 78 inch headroom? If so, can properly insulate the one I'm looking at without a roof raise. Just sheet in Windows

Some do, some don't.

If you want the max factory headroom get a bus with 12" window openings. You can tell which ones have 12" and which ones have 9". The 9" window openings have the top line of the windows even with the top of the driver's window and the top of the service door. The 12" window openings have the top line 3" above the driver's window and the top of the service door.
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:02 AM   #27
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I find it terribly difficult to believe that removing any significant number of windows, let alone doing a roof raise, is necessary in order to stay warm in the winter. Though we have not yet spent a winter in our skoolie, the very first thing I noticed is how much BETTER the windows in my bus are than the windows in MY HOUSE! We live in a 250 year old antique farmhouse in New England with ORIGINAL single pane windows and NO insulation. Its cold and drafty but with our little wood stove we stay warm enough. I cannot fathom how one could be cold in a bus so long as they have at least a decent wood stove, a bit of insulation, and no drafts. I guess I will find out for sure next winter, but I will be shocked if the bus is not more warm and cozy than our old house. Having as many windows as possible is a big part of what we love about a bus vs. traditional motor homes. We did also make sure to buy a bus with high headroom from the factory. The added work of a roof raise would not at all excite me, and making a bus with a raised roof look half way decent when you're done is quite a challenge... But to each his own! That's why we do what we do, right?!
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:55 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by WhiteWhale View Post
I find it terribly difficult to believe that removing any significant number of windows, let alone doing a roof raise, is necessary in order to stay warm in the winter. Though we have not yet spent a winter in our skoolie, the very first thing I noticed is how much BETTER the windows in my bus are than the windows in MY HOUSE! We live in a 250 year old antique farmhouse in New England with ORIGINAL single pane windows and NO insulation. Its cold and drafty but with our little wood stove we stay warm enough. I cannot fathom how one could be cold in a bus so long as they have at least a decent wood stove, a bit of insulation, and no drafts. I guess I will find out for sure next winter, but I will be shocked if the bus is not more warm and cozy than our old house. Having as many windows as possible is a big part of what we love about a bus vs. traditional motor homes. We did also make sure to buy a bus with high headroom from the factory. The added work of a roof raise would not at all excite me, and making a bus with a raised roof look half way decent when you're done is quite a challenge... But to each his own! That's why we do what we do, right?!
The big difference between a bus and a house is a house usually does not have large open spaces underneath where the wind can whistle through. That can really suck the heat out.

Also, while a 250 year old house may have drafty windows, they are most likely not as drafty as some of the windows I have seen on buses. I have seen some buses with split sash windows that were so loosey goosey than you could push a finger up between the upper and lower sash.

If you put a wood stove in a bus it can keep it plenty warm enough. And since most school buses are less than 300 square feet it won't take that much to warm it all up. But with some different windows and better insulation you would not have to use nearly as much wood in the stove or juice to run A/C in the summer time.
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Old 07-25-2016, 06:35 AM   #29
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Check out wiseway pellet stoves that's what I'm planning to put in my bus, the small version. Our headspace on our 1998 bluebird is 6'2" before insulation, but were planning 2" on roof and floor and dealing with a low ceiling- how often are you needing to stand in the bus? We figure just to shower and cook and we can deal with some crouching. We're 6'1 and 6'5
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Old 07-25-2016, 07:08 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteWhale View Post
I find it terribly difficult to believe that removing any significant number of windows, let alone doing a roof raise, is necessary in order to stay warm in the winter. Though we have not yet spent a winter in our skoolie, the very first thing I noticed is how much BETTER the windows in my bus are than the windows in MY HOUSE! We live in a 250 year old antique farmhouse in New England with ORIGINAL single pane windows and NO insulation. Its cold and drafty but with our little wood stove we stay warm enough. I cannot fathom how one could be cold in a bus so long as they have at least a decent wood stove, a bit of insulation, and no drafts. I guess I will find out for sure next winter, but I will be shocked if the bus is not more warm and cozy than our old house. Having as many windows as possible is a big part of what we love about a bus vs. traditional motor homes. We did also make sure to buy a bus with high headroom from the factory. The added work of a roof raise would not at all excite me, and making a bus with a raised roof look half way decent when you're done is quite a challenge... But to each his own! That's why we do what we do, right?!
believe it,in illinois i had half my bus closed off with 3 heaters going and it got down to 37 in the bus, insulate well my friend insulate well!
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