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Old 07-25-2016, 06:22 AM   #31
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
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Year: 1991
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take a look at the bus heater labels onb your bus... many of them are made by "bergstrom" or hurri-hot and have a BTU label on them for when they are fully running..

my bus was built with a total of about 200,000 BTU of heat whebn the coolant is at 185 degrees... granted thats a stock school bus and iut would be designed to warm it up fairly quickly.. but I know from driving busses in the past that on a 0 degree day I ran every heater I had on high to be able to drive the bus with a short sleeve shirt and my jacket off... yes a parked bus will be easier to heat than a moving bus.. unless its windy.. school bus windows may Appear to be better than your old wood farmhouse windows.. however the metal transmits heat...

if you insulate out your bus and were to rebuild your school bus windows they would be better but still not at what a good RV winbdow would be...

A/C is the same way... sachool busses in stock format typically run 100,000 - 120,000 BTU of A/C for a conventional 71 passenger 12 row bus....

-Christopher
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:34 AM   #32
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Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: pa
Posts: 261
Year: 1998
Coachwork: corbeil
Chassis: ford e350
Engine: 7.3 powerstroke
I lived 4 years full time in 73 vanHool converted city bus on the Gaasperplas campground in Amsterdam. I worked in Amsterdam and my GF worked at the hospital.
The bus had 6 cylinder DAF turbo diesel. We bought it for 600 dutch guilders anoher 50 for a used fridge. The rest was recycled material out of dumpsters.
Low temperatures in winter are about 28F
About half of the windows were blocked of and insulated. The removed windows were used as storm windows for the other ones.
We had a eberspacher diesel air heater in the middle of the bus.
The bedroom was in the rear.
We also had a wood/ coal stove.
No other insulation was done.
In the winter when freezing we had icicles in the bed room from the humidity. We were around 30 yrs in the time and no kids and it did not matter. It woke you up in the morning when the ice started melting and the drops would fall on your face.
To get out of bed we turned the eberspacher on and in about 15 minutes it was comfortable enough to get going.
we were parked next to the toilet building and used that toilet / shower.
Then of to work. Around 6PM when we came home we fired up the wood stove, my grandmothers old parlor stove, still have it.
It heated the bus with no effort. Of course there were cold spots at the front entrance door and the front window.

So I think it is all about what you are willing to put up with.
There are people living in tents and igloos. Some for fun some for adventure. I would say try it for a winter and see where your adventure is.

Later J
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Old 07-29-2016, 08:36 PM   #33
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Year: 1990
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Might be too late to reply, but you got some crazy answers early on. I did none of that nonsense and I lived full time in my bus on the slopes of Colorado all winter of '14-'15 with my lowest temps hitting minus 20. Windows for me are a necessity, I love windows and I kept them free and clear. The floor and walls were like ice so I used rigid insulation up to the bottom of the windows from home depot, I believe it was 1.5" and a thin layer of plywood with carpet. I have a small indoor safe propane catalyst heater also from home depot. I used an automatic switch over valve from Ace hardware to tie two propane tanks together and kept a third always full as spare. This was home for my dog while I was working on mountain overnights so temps had to be very livable and it was easy to keep the bus between 55 to 70f with my tanks lasting about 3 weeks. (Short bus!! Smaller space) I met a few other skoolies out there with full size busses and wood stoves, they were very warm and cozy inside but they were always dealing w firewood. My biggest problem was parking the bus someplace where it was OK to be and live out of. Some mountain ski areas are not cool with that, others were happy to have me. Good luck! First chair, last call!
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Old 07-29-2016, 08:41 PM   #34
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Year: 1990
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Rated Cap: 1
Might be too late to reply, but you got some crazy answers early on. I did none of that nonsense and I lived full time in my bus on the slopes of Colorado all winter of '14-'15 with my lowest temps hitting minus 20. Windows for me are a necessity, I love windows and I kept them free and clear. The floor and walls were like ice so I used rigid insulation up to the bottom of the windows from home depot, I believe it was 1.5" and a thin layer of plywood with carpet. I have a small indoor safe propane catalyst heater also from home depot. I used an automatic switch over valve from Ace hardware to tie two propane tanks together and kept a third always full as spare. This was home for my dog while I was working on mountain overnights so temps had to be very livable and it was easy to keep the bus between 55 to 70f with my tanks lasting about 3 weeks. (Short bus!! Smaller space) I met a few other skoolies out there with full size busses and wood stoves, they were very warm and cozy inside but they were always dealing w firewood. My biggest problem was parking the bus someplace where it was OK to be and live out of. Some mountain ski areas are not cool with that, others were happy to have me. Good luck! First chair, last call!
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Old 07-29-2016, 10:27 PM   #35
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Join Date: May 2016
Location: Richmond Virginia
Posts: 893
Year: 1984
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Great thread. Really enjoy reading members actual experience about winter in the bus because i have been wondering what it may be like. Granted i am not promised tomorrow, so i keep focused on today where the struggle is staying cool...and im just not, but i will survive and it will pass. Probably after it drives me bonkers, but hey thats ok too.

I was gifted a nice Vozelgang wood stove from a friend and look forward to using that, but i will need to be somewhere that i can buy a chord of wood and store it, or tarp it in the bed of the truck. Could be tricky. May get a good propane backup just in case.

And a friend in Vegas offered a spot to stay next to their house. Vegas is too far for me but it's nice to have options, and that one would be skipping winter all together.
I could always fly south. Who knows what tomorrow will bring i tell myself.
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Old 07-29-2016, 11:14 PM   #36
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Join Date: May 2015
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Originally Posted by WhiteWhale View Post
The added work of a roof raise would not at all excite me, and making a bus with a raised roof look half way decent when you're done is quite a challenge...

I wouldn't kick this one outta bed for eating crackers....
I missed out on it for $8500....Amish woodworking interior


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Old 08-01-2016, 10:34 PM   #37
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Join Date: Sep 2013
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Year: 1988
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmania View Post
I wouldn't kick this one outta bed for eating crackers....
I missed out on it for $8500....Amish woodworking interior


Only because there's more room on the floor.
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