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Old 07-29-2016, 04:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somewhereinusa View Post
Took about 2 minutes to find installation manual. Not an SC, that didn't come up in any searches, all 2000 air tops are going to install the same.

https://www.butlertechnik.com/techni...top-2000st-d17

Dick
OMG I feel dumb, I remember being on that site but in german....I should have switch the language.........
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Old 07-29-2016, 04:39 PM   #12
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After a quick reading they do not talk about where it can be mounted but how it can be mounted, so it might be ok to mounted on top of wood over a metal plate.

In another note :

"Both recirculation and fresh air modes are possible.
For fresh air mode it must be ensured that the hot air is taken from an area
protected from splashing water and spray and in such a way that no water
can ingress into the heater if the vehicle travels through a water hazard for
which that vehicle is licensed."

I have seen in professional installations that is normally set in to recirculation mode but I'm concern on sleeping in winter areas ( -20C or -30C) overnight and CO2 contamination.

Is it good enough in recirculation mode and have a roof top vent with a fan or something ?

Thanks.
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Old 07-30-2016, 03:04 PM   #13
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For me personally I would cut a hole big enough for insulation to insulate the duct sleeve all the way to the air outlet/register. Don't know that specific heater but most are made for a good bit of ductwork to be connected to them. With a short run of ductwork the metal is going to be very hot. Not saying it will start a fire but long term exposure(winter time) if touching wood it could happen.
So use a good insulation to seperate everything.
My concern was the actual install of the unit itself especially if it is running while on the road and the heater exhaust and intake in the proper orientation?
Heater won't burn right and if a safety switch/switches fail then you have a time bomb?
Sorry, I do a lot of govt fuel/oil,steam,natural gas and are dabbling in bio-diesel boiler installs so safety is first in my head but proper install is second.
Proper air in and out of any diesel fired appliance is what makes it run as designed to much in and not enough out makes it inefficient to much out and not enough in is the same.
What I am trying to say is just cause it works good setting in your driveway doesn't men that it will work like that while going down the road?
The intake needs clean air in and the exhaust needs an un-interrupted outlet for perfect performance.
That's my opinion?
Look at a super saver turkey heater xl install.
I can put one of these on the 1st floor of. Building and heat the 2nd and 3rd and one on the 4th floor to heat 4th,5th and 6th and so on everything radiates up in a concrete construction world but proper install still calls for fresh air and uninterrupted exhaust?
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Old 07-30-2016, 03:07 PM   #14
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Buy a few 10$ 12volt carbon monoxide sensors. Mine came from camping world?
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Old 07-30-2016, 04:36 PM   #15
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Quote:
My concern was the actual install of the unit itself especially if it is running while on the road and the heater exhaust and intake in the proper orientation
Why would you do that, engine makes more than enough heat to heat the whole bus?
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Old 07-31-2016, 08:57 AM   #16
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These are commonly installed in big rig trucks to keep the sleeper compartment warm at night. They are usually installed in the storage area under the bed which has rubber flooring installed but the unit sits up a little off the flooring. So long as there's nothing directly against it or obstructing the air flow it's usually fine so my take with a wood floor is so long as it 'stands' a little off the floor it should be fine. The hottest part is the port which puts the heated air into your living space. The exhaust vents down through the floor and then back a little beyond the back edge of the cab so that fumes don't accumulate under the cab... I'm sure the same is simple enough in a bus, down and back or to the side just beyond the skirt. It's not a large pipe like an engine tailpipe so shouldn't be too unsightly.
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