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Old 01-12-2020, 11:26 AM   #21
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What scared you off of using a propane tank?
Not OP but a popular concern with using a propane tank is that trace amounts of propane i the tank while cutting it open can turn into real injury. Flushing the tank with water is a good way to make that a safe operation.
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Old 01-12-2020, 01:44 PM   #22
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The one thing I see missing in these homemade units is the larger effective units use a lining of fire bricks that will hold the heat longer than the metal can. Once the fire is out, the heat still maintains longer than without the bricks.
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Old 01-12-2020, 02:30 PM   #23
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The one thing I see missing in these homemade units is the larger effective units use a lining of fire bricks that will hold the heat longer than the metal can. Once the fire is out, the heat still maintains longer than without the bricks.
My brother in law suggested that, and if we find small fire bricks, I plan to try. Since I didn't put an oven in my design, it has some more space to work with.

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Old 01-12-2020, 02:32 PM   #24
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Not OP but a popular concern with using a propane tank is that trace amounts of propane i the tank while cutting it open can turn into real injury. Flushing the tank with water is a good way to make that a safe operation.
I didn't like the idea of using a propane bottle either, as I'm not 100% certain I can make it 100% empty, so I used the exhaust headers.

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Old 01-12-2020, 04:33 PM   #25
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The one thing I see missing in these homemade units is the larger effective units use a lining of fire bricks that will hold the heat longer than the metal can. Once the fire is out, the heat still maintains longer than without the bricks.



So the fraudster is a wood stove expert too now, how blessed is this boy?


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Old 01-12-2020, 04:42 PM   #26
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I didn't like the idea of using a propane bottle either, as I'm not 100% certain I can make it 100% empty, so I used the exhaust headers.

Chris
I have powder coated and plasma cut many propane tanks. If they are large, all you need is to hook a hose to your exhaust pipe and fill the can with carbon monoxide for a few minutes, then cut. I sometimes rinse them out and put them in the oven and then turn the oven on so they evaporate out before getting to ignition temp. I once made firepits from 500ga. propane tanks. The first time I hit one with a plasma cutter I was so filled will anxiety. I laid a big metal plate between me and the tank, called my exwife on the cell and told her I was putting the phone down, in the next 10 seconds, if you hear a BOOM, hang up and call 911. I'm still here today.
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Old 01-12-2020, 04:43 PM   #27
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I didn't like the idea of using a propane bottle either, as I'm not 100% certain I can make it 100% empty, so I used the exhaust headers.
Chris
Quite easy Remove the valve with a big pipe wrench.,,,, Then fill tank with water.
NOW you can cut it anywhere you want with a sawzall or grinder and there will NO propane vapors anywhere.

This procedure works well for welding fuel tanks as well.
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Old 01-12-2020, 04:53 PM   #28
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Quite easy Remove the valve with a big pipe wrench.,,,, Then fill tank with water.
NOW you can cut it anywhere you want with a sawzall or grinder and there will NO propane vapors anywhere.

This procedure works well for welding fuel tanks as well.
Someone recommended that and sand. Those would both work, but where is the 500 gallons of water or sand going to go once I cut it open.

A full tank of gas can be safely welded.
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Old 01-12-2020, 07:27 PM   #29
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A gent I knew bought a compact pellet stove for his cabin that ran from 12 volts. Would something like that work for you?

That could possibly work.
Do you have any information on that?
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Old 01-12-2020, 08:05 PM   #30
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That could possibly work.
Do you have any information on that?
No I don't. He invited me over to see his new pellet stove and was all excited about his new stove that ran from a 12 volt battery. We lived in a location that experienced frequent power outages in the winter and he was fed up with loosing heat when the power went out

Two years later I moved away. The last time I talked to him he was still tickled about having heat when the power went out.
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Old 01-12-2020, 08:32 PM   #31
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Someone recommended that and sand. Those would both work, but where is the 500 gallons of water or sand going to go once I cut it open.

A full tank of gas can be safely welded.
I don't think that I have seen a 500 gallon propane tank. Are folks actually making wood stoves from 500 gallon tanks? Seems awfully large...

Regarding welding on a gasoline tank, after a family member got to take two helicopter rides and a ride in a Learjet as the result of letting fire and a gasoline tank get too close together. He even got to stay a month in Harboview Burn Center in Seattle.

I will definitely leave gas tank welding to folks that are better versed and have better insurance than me. I tend to err on the side of caution.
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Old 01-12-2020, 11:17 PM   #32
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I have powder coated and plasma cut many propane tanks. If they are large, all you need is to hook a hose to your exhaust pipe and fill the can with carbon monoxide for a few minutes, then cut. I sometimes rinse them out and put them in the oven and then turn the oven on so they evaporate out before getting to ignition temp. I once made firepits from 500ga. propane tanks. The first time I hit one with a plasma cutter I was so filled will anxiety. I laid a big metal plate between me and the tank, called my exwife on the cell and told her I was putting the phone down, in the next 10 seconds, if you hear a BOOM, hang up and call 911. I'm still here today.

I'm amazed too since carbon monoxide is flamable and explosive.



Carbon monoxide is the main gas produced by gasifiers for running gasoline engines on wood smoke (there is also hydrogen and natural gas produced in smaller quantities). Carbon monoxide buildup is what is responsible for some houses blowing up in a fire. Carbon monoxide is lighter than air and if it cannot escape a room, it builds up at the ceiling and when the flames hit it there is an explosion if enough oxygen is also present.



Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Carbon dioxide is what is produced by complete combustion and will not burn or support combustion. Not absolutely sure, but I believe that in a normal fire, the orange/yellow flame is the carbon monoxide being burned off.


Although I have never done it I believe the most common procedure for opening up propane tanks is to first fill them full of water then cut them open. I suppose that carbon dioxide would work, however I would be afraid that some propane could still be in the container and even though it was surrounded by carbon dioxide, Murphys law would take over and there would still be enough oxygen mixed in to make it go boom.
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Old 01-12-2020, 11:47 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Mekanic View Post
Quite easy Remove the valve with a big pipe wrench.,,,, Then fill tank with water.
NOW you can cut it anywhere you want with a sawzall or grinder and there will NO propane vapors anywhere.

This procedure works well for welding fuel tanks as well.
For safety, professionals use a wrench made of brass to prevent sparks. Aluminum pipe wrenches usually have steel teeth which can spark if you slip (don't slip).

Can the tank be filled with water thru the valve? Liquid propane will go thru all the valves that I have seen. I am not sure how you would get the vapor out or if it would saturate the water.

Something else that I think might work (but I would be afraid to try because some vapor could still remain) is to open the valve, leave the tank in the summer sun to get hot. Most of the gas will go on out, the put in some water and let it evaporate and drive out more gas. It may help if the tank was turned so that the valve was at the bottom since propane is heavier than air? Daltons law of partial pressures may prevent that from working, just thinking out loud.


I was in a gas explosion when I was 15 because I did not think things through good enough. Don't want to do that again.
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Old 01-13-2020, 12:31 AM   #34
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Someone recommended that and sand. Those would both work, but where is the 500 gallons of water or sand going to go once I cut it open.

is that a trick question? LOL



Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
A full tank of gas can be safely welded.

You need to add some qualifiers to a statement like that.


What type of full gas tank can be safely welded? one with a valve opened (and vented far, far away if it is toxic or flammable0? Please, let me know, if I'm around, I want to leave you to it.



Even non flammable gases like argon or h2o will explode from vapor pressure if it gets too hot. Flammable gases can get crazy any number of ways. Liquids can get even worse. I think that the smaller tanks can be even worse than the big ones.


In my opinion welding an any kind of tank is like taking a tiger for a walk. It can get crazy real fast if your not on your toes and know what you are doing.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:26 PM   #35
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Found some diesel heaters on Amazon for under $200, and they are 12 volt.



This seems the best way to go.


Type the following into the Amazon search:


Happybuy 5KW Diesel Air Heater All in One 12V Diesel Parking Heater Muffler 5000W Diesel Heater Remote Control with LCD Switch for RV Motorhome Bus and Trailer

and

Happybuy 8KW Diesel Air Heater 12V Diesel Parking Heater Muffler Diesel Heater with LCD Thermostat Monitor for RV Motorhome Trailer Trucks Boats



Here's a pretty good review after a year's use:






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Old 01-13-2020, 08:16 PM   #36
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Found some diesel heaters on Amazon for under $200, and they are 12 volt.



This seems the best way to go.


Type the following into the Amazon search:


Happybuy 5KW Diesel Air Heater All in One 12V Diesel Parking Heater Muffler 5000W Diesel Heater Remote Control with LCD Switch for RV Motorhome Bus and Trailer

and

Happybuy 8KW Diesel Air Heater 12V Diesel Parking Heater Muffler Diesel Heater with LCD Thermostat Monitor for RV Motorhome Trailer Trucks Boats



Here's a pretty good review after a year's use:






We just installed this one the other day. It's been working out pretty well so far and it's a bit quieter than our last one that crapped out on us.
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Old 01-13-2020, 08:58 PM   #37
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We just installed this one the other day. It's been working out pretty well so far and it's a bit quieter than our last one that crapped out on us.



Good to know! I think I will order this unit!
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Old 01-13-2020, 09:39 PM   #38
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Good to know! I think I will order this unit!



By the way... do you know of a 110/120 volt adapter that I can use with this? Right now my bus isn't running (need to install a block heater and its quite cold here). I can use the heater to work on the interior until I get the block heater sorted out.
Thanks!
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