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Old 11-13-2016, 07:58 AM   #11
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Or.... instead of plywood between the runs of tubing cut your foam board insulation to fit, taking into account the degree of foam compression from the weight of the top layers of flooring and whatever you plan to put on top of it. Laying the still applies.
reflective aluminum
Sounds good. where do i get the
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Old 11-13-2016, 10:08 AM   #12
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reflective aluminum
Sounds good. where do i get the
Home Depot, Lowe's etc.
HVAC supply stores, etc.
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Old 11-14-2016, 02:55 PM   #13
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Has anyone ever wrapped copper tubing around the woodstove pipe? Then run water through it to apply heating throughout the bus? Just a thought
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Old 11-14-2016, 03:04 PM   #14
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With the requirement to run double pipe as an exhaust path to the outside I'm not sure you'd get the water hot enough to do much good.
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Old 11-14-2016, 03:10 PM   #15
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With the requirement to run double pipe as an exhaust path to the outside I'm not sure you'd get the water hot enough to do much good.
My 4 dog stove runs single wall for the first 16" because of the damper.

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Old 11-14-2016, 03:15 PM   #16
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With a setup like that then if you could wind enough copper around the pipe to get a decent amount of heat transfer then it might work... but the down side would be if you cool the exhaust too much you'll get creosote buildup inside the chimney pipe and that's a recipe for disaster (chimney fire).
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Old 11-14-2016, 03:22 PM   #17
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With a setup like that then if you could wind enough copper around the pipe to get a decent amount of heat transfer then it might work... but the down side would be if you cool the exhaust too much you'll get creosote buildup inside the chimney pipe and that's a recipe for disaster (chimney fire).
Good point 😊

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Old 11-14-2016, 03:45 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Tootalltechie View Post
Has anyone ever wrapped copper tubing around the woodstove pipe? Then run water through it to apply heating throughout the bus? Just a thought
Gordon

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Yes. I have done this. If you attempt this make damn sure you have atleast two high quality pressure relief valves on your tank. If you don't your tank will explode because of the energy of turning water to steam... Don't worry about cooling your stack temp too much...
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Old 11-14-2016, 04:25 PM   #19
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Has anyone ever wrapped copper tubing around the woodstove pipe? Then run water through it to apply heating throughout the bus? Just a thought
Gordon

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Seems like you would need mixing valves and such to control the water temp running under the floor.
Might be doing the funky chicken dance if you got the stove cranking.
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Old 11-15-2016, 06:24 PM   #20
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Couple of things to add.
1-Relief valve sized properly on the heat supply at its hottest point a piped to a safe area/zone for discharge where scalding boiling water can't hurt anyone.
2- the copper shouldn't be in direct contact with other metals cause over time they will corrode but It will last some time but as the stove heats up it expands while the water circulating is still cool so the stove rubs on the copper until the water in it reaches the temperature for the copper to start expanding. So more rubbing and the same goes with the cool down of each one? Not saying you need 1" of seperation but each one needs its own wiggle room.
3- I think it is very doable but I think ethylene glycol like in solar heating systems would serve the idea better with higher boiling points and lower freezing points.
If your pump messes up with water while the heater is cooking then whatever water in the line starts boiling and pushing itself through the piping and eventually turns to steam pushing itself through your piping?
Sorry I do commercial Heating water for a living and awhile back I had an old steam heat exchanger(copper tubing ran through a steel tube where the steam surrounds the copper water circulating through it) go bad and the steam got into the copper in the building and melted almost every soft/lead free solder joint there.
If you do go the copper route and have to have a joint/connection downstream of the heater then I can only reccomend silver brazing instead of any mechanical means (flare,compression) or soft solder?
Keep your ideas going and I have several of my own but don't want to go on anymore including wrapping the top of the heater with piping and a plate over the top to deflect it back to the piping but enough to cook on? That was a barrel heater pipe dream I had?
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