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Old 08-20-2019, 06:52 AM   #61
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@Danjo, putting the thermistor through the drain hole should work, unless it's too big. But I think doing a little careful surgery to the gasket where the lid rests should work just fine.
I wonder if there are any wireless versions of these (like, using bluetooth for the sensor or something).
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:34 AM   #62
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So I've looked a little more. Amazon has others. More than when I looked at this a couple of years ago. I haven't read reviews yet.

Refrigerator or Freezer Thermostat (Temperature Controller)
https://www.amazon.com/Refrigerator-...dp/B000EXROSE/

And another that's a little cheaper and very versatile.
Inkbird ITC308 Freezer Thermostat Heating Cooling Plug Temperature Controller Outlet 110V 1200W Digital Temp Control Greenhouse Aquarium Heater Cooler Reptile Brewing Fermentation Kegerator Probe
https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Therm...dp/B015E2UFGM/

And a newer model by Johnson Controls
Johnson Controls A421ABG-02C A421 Series Electronic Temperature Control with Pre Wired Power Cord, -40 to 212 Degree F Temperature Range
https://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Contr...dp/B01IWIZJHA/
Thanks! This looks really interesting, and is likely something I am willing to try. Sounds like it will be on the same efficiency level as a dedicated 12V fridge, but more spacious and less costly, if I'm understanding things properly. Of course there's the inverter to factor in, as well. I assume a pure sine wave would be needed to properly run a freezer?

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Old 08-20-2019, 11:04 AM   #63
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LFP is LIfepo4 or Lithium Iron Phosphate the most friendly and stable substitute for lead acid batteries. I highly recommend them. You get 80-90% discharge and you get 10X more cycles out of them than a comparable lead acid battery. The best battery on the market with a Lifepo4 is Battleborn or Renogy
What makes them the best?
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:06 AM   #64
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@farok, I don't know much about inverters, so I don't know for sure if a pure sine-wave inverter is necessary to run a motor. So I'm guessing when I say no, I don't think so. Hopefully someone else will respond to your question.
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:16 AM   #65
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Motor not the issue, but lots of SS electronic controls in modern fridges, usually the first point of failure, and can cost so much people just buy a new fridge.
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:19 AM   #66
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OK, that makes sense. Thanks for pointing that out. That's another reason to convert a small chest freezer into a fridge.
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:21 AM   #67
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@Danjo, putting the thermistor through the drain hole should work, unless it's too big. But I think doing a little careful surgery to the gasket where the lid rests should work just fine.
I didnít do anything to the gasket when I was running the kegerator. The thermistor wire is about 18 gauge, so the gasket still seals around it pretty well.
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:26 AM   #68
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I was thinking of using the joint in the gasket material, just peeling it up a bit and then using glue or caulk to stick it back again. If that's not necessary, so much the better.
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Old 08-20-2019, 03:24 PM   #69
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While I'd love to go down this path, how do these freezers do when bouncing down the road several hours a day (or in some cases 10-15 hours a day)? I know they are made to ship from the factory, but they're not plugged in during shipping. In thinking this through some more, I question if they are actually capable of functioning long-term in a mobile environment with the bouncing associated with driving, not to mention often not remaining level. Has anyone done this for extended traveling and know if this is a concern or not?

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Old 08-20-2019, 03:34 PM   #70
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I think if they're not running, and I do not intend to run mine while I'm driving, then the effects of a little bouncing and not being level for a while won't matter much, if at all. A freezer doesn't have to run often to keep food frozen. And if no one goes digging around in the one that's at fridge temperatures, then it should stay cool for quite a while too.

One thing that concerns me more than the machinery, though, is the possibility of compacting the insulation on the bottom from a little bouncing under the weight of the contents. But I think a work around can be found for that one too. And I intend to go ahead and find how it works.
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Old 08-20-2019, 03:50 PM   #71
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Good point, and thanks for the insights! This still seems like a good option!

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Old 08-20-2019, 03:55 PM   #72
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And needing to take it easy on the bouncing is another good point. Thanks for bringing up that subject.
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Old 08-20-2019, 05:00 PM   #73
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The Engel portables came out of outback Oz 4x4ing, tremendous reputation for lasting a ling time in nasty conditions
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Old 08-20-2019, 05:12 PM   #74
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Yes, they are tough, and also small and expensive. The largest, and most expensive, model I found is 21 gallons capacity, and goes for $1639.99.

But, on the positive side, it's not just 12 volts. It runs on 110AC too. And it does look tough, at least in the photos, so if someone wanted a fridge-freezer tough enough to bang around some, this might be it.


https://www.engelcoolers.com/shop/12...-freezers.html
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Old 08-20-2019, 06:55 PM   #75
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I think if they're not running, and I do not intend to run mine while I'm driving, then the effects of a little bouncing and not being level for a while won't matter much, if at all. A freezer doesn't have to run often to keep food frozen. And if no one goes digging around in the one that's at fridge temperatures, then it should stay cool for quite a while too.

One thing that concerns me more than the machinery, though, is the possibility of compacting the insulation on the bottom from a little bouncing under the weight of the contents. But I think a work around can be found for that one too. And I intend to go ahead and find how it works.
I wonder if it's worth it to put extra insulation around it. From where do these things radiate heat?
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:33 PM   #76
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Usually through the sides as far as I know. The manufacturer's tech data usually or at least often says how many inches clearance is needed. Most of seen are 3 inches.

So I think you could put extra insulation on the lid, but I'm not sure how effective that would be since cold air sinks before it mixes with warmer air.

[edit] This is why I'm interested in an Energy Star Certified freezer like this one, which is not that much more expensive than the one you posted the link to, just a few bucks I think:

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/avanti-...inum/6317313.p
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:41 PM   #77
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Usually through the sides as far as I know. The manufacturer's tech data usually or at least often says how many inches clearance is needed. Most of seen are 3 inches.

So I think you could put extra insulation on the lid, but I'm not sure how effective that would be since cold air sinks before it mixes with warmer air.

[edit] This is why I'm interested in an Energy Star Certified freezer like this one, which is not that much more expensive than the one you posted the link to, just a few bucks I think:

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/avanti-...inum/6317313.p
Avanti!!! Thank you, that was the brand name I was trying to remember. The one I saw was like 16" wide and $120 bucks or something like that (smaller than 3.5 I think).

If these radiate through the sides, methinks extra insulation would be a bad idea.
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:48 PM   #78
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Yeah, you shouldn't even put them close to a wall or something even if they don't quite touch. But Energy Star certified are suppose to have more insulation AND more efficient motors too. I don't know how much difference it actually makes, but it sounds good, and I think every little bit helps.
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Old 08-20-2019, 10:40 PM   #79
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Extra insulation of non-heat-radiating surfaces always helps.

As does increasing heat transfer away from the heat-radiating areas, especially the condenser and electronics.
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Old 08-20-2019, 10:46 PM   #80
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Yeah, adding a small computer fan or two blowing on the areas that need to lose heat would help, especially if you could direct that heat outside, or not during the winter, I guess.
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