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Old 08-28-2015, 12:01 AM   #11
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Or moving parts.
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Old 08-28-2015, 01:00 AM   #12
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Gravity feed propane heater/furnaces

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Originally Posted by Longrun View Post
Though that water heater seems pretty sweet, too bad it's outdoor use only, probably would only last a couple of months of regular use, and probably freeze solid here I'm Canada.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1440737944.308369.jpg

I love mine / vented it through the roof - it's been going strong for 3yrs...
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Old 08-28-2015, 09:56 AM   #13
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I believe the OP is talking about a furnace for heating the bus, USMCRockinRV.

I have some questions for you over here: Venting an Eccotemp L5 propane water heater. I'd be much obliged if you could throw me some answers
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Old 08-28-2015, 10:04 AM   #14
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I've been in a camper or two that have that style of convection propane heater. I don't think they're particularly efficient. Reason being that (like the Eccotemp water heater shown above) they require hot exhaust to keep the convection process working. This means that some of the heat from the propane is going inside the camper and some of the heat is being dumped outside.
Power vented appliances are more efficient. Since power vented appliances don't rely on a draft to pull the exhaust outside the heat exchange can be more efficient, usually leaving the exhaust warm to the touch instead of hot. More heat inside, less outside. Of course, they require electricity to run.
Convection furnaces are simple, though. If you don't mind the added cost of burning excess propane then they may be the way to go.
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Old 08-28-2015, 10:10 AM   #15
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If it is fuel efficiency you are looking for, catalytic heaters are way ahead of everything else at about 98%.
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Old 08-28-2015, 10:19 AM   #16
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True, true.. I was lusting over one of these a while back:
Olympian Wave 6 Catalytic Heater
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Old 08-28-2015, 10:38 AM   #17
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Ya...really sweet heat. Had one in my old Bird and loved it. Worth every penny. No exhaust flue required but you do need replace the oxygen it consumes. Remember to leave a window or roof vent cracked open just a bit.
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Old 08-28-2015, 08:49 PM   #18
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Catalytics do seem more efficient, but how open do you need to keep your vent? Around here I have to expect outside temperatures of -40 or lower for weeks at a time. I'd like to avoid having to lose heat just to keep things safe.
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Old 08-29-2015, 12:05 AM   #19
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Doesn't take very much at all but is critical if you are in a tightly sealed structure. If the Cat (or any other heater for that matter) consumes too much of your oxygen, you"ll be waking up dead.

I hate it when that happens.

Best to check the manufacturer's recommendations and heed them.
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Old 08-29-2015, 10:29 AM   #20
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One of the problems created by an unvented heater is the
amount of moisture they create when they are running.
They may be 98% efficient but one of the major products
of combustion is H2O. In an automobile you get about
1 1/2 gallons of water for every gallon of gas you burn.
That's why the exhaust rusts out from the inside. Water
dripping down the walls and ceiling is not pleasant.
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