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Old 05-19-2016, 10:38 AM   #11
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I was looking at the 8D planar. Does the 44 do a good job with the whole bus? I had planned on installing it underneath and ducting 3 zones with it, back bedroom, main cabin and driver's foot area. Keep in mind I have a 40' pusher.

Did you plumb it into your current fuel tank or do you use the 1 gallon tank it comes with?

TIA!

-Doc
Our bus is 26 feet. The 44 keeps us warm in the 30s even with some wind.
I have it under the front steps and one outlet on the step well wall facing forward towards into coolest part of the bus. The warmed air moves up and rearward with enough speed you can feel/see the air moving. I usually keep it at 22C during the awake times, then 17-19C at night.
I used the supplied 7 liter tank and that lasts for 2 pretty cold nights/days, although I keep it topped off to avoid any surprises.
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Old 05-19-2016, 12:13 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by 2kool4skool View Post
Our bus is 26 feet. The 44 keeps us warm in the 30s even with some wind.
I have it under the front steps and one outlet on the step well wall facing forward towards into coolest part of the bus. The warmed air moves up and rearward with enough speed you can feel/see the air moving. I usually keep it at 22C during the awake times, then 17-19C at night.
I used the supplied 7 liter tank and that lasts for 2 pretty cold nights/days, although I keep it topped off to avoid any surprises.

How long have you had it installed? I will most likely tap my tank and use the fuel line for it. That way I don't have to go outside to fill the tank when it gets low.

Thanks so much for your feedback!

-Doc
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Old 05-19-2016, 01:07 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
How long have you had it installed? I will most likely tap my tank and use the fuel line for it. That way I don't have to go outside to fill the tank when it gets low.

Thanks so much for your feedback!

-Doc
November '15.
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Old 05-19-2016, 07:49 PM   #14
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I agree that's about the perfect backup heat source. I watched a video of one of these installed in a boat. It was kind of smokey and a little noisy, but that beats being cold.
They seem to either be for heating the coolant or for heating the air. I still can't understand the wide discrepancy in pricing online. Do they make a heater that does both, air and coolant heating. It's kind of hard to tell with the information available.
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Old 05-19-2016, 07:53 PM   #15
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I agree that's about the perfect backup heat source. I watched a video of one of these installed in a boat. It was kind of smokey and a little noisy, but that beats being cold.
They seem to either be for heating the coolant or for heating the air. I still can't understand the wide discrepancy in pricing online. Do they make a heater that does both, air and coolant heating. It's kind of hard to tell with the information available.
keep your bus heating system installed.. then heat the coolant loops and use the bus heat exchangers to heat the air... your little heater would heat the loops and then you simply turn on the fans on the heaters (engine off) to heat the inside ofthe bus
-Christopher
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Old 05-19-2016, 08:03 PM   #16
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Yeah, I thought of that. I'd like to figure a way to avoid the fan use.

What about setting up the heater cores so they could heat by convection? Probably not real efficient but quieter and less power consumption. The air always stratifies without a fan. Cold feet.
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Old 05-19-2016, 08:12 PM   #17
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if you heat your cores up to about 180-190 they will radiate heat... a little.. but they are not designed to work that way.. Bus heater boxes are designed for advection (fan forced).. as are the shapes of the coild and placement of the fins.. why so opposed to using a fan? your webasto is going to burn more fuel keeping everything at 180+ rather than the 140 you could probably run at except the coldest of days...

Bus heaters are designed to blow the heat down.. and are easily re-ducted for other configurations.. your front passenger and rear passenger heaters should easily heat a bus when its not in motion with coolant at 140..
Plus bus heaters are Cheap.. you already have a bunch of them in the bus... my little shortie has 6.. so yours probably has a few more..

-Christopher
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Old 05-19-2016, 09:48 PM   #18
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Yeah this one has the normal dash heaters, a drivers foot heater and a rear heater. They even ran the hoses under the floor to the rear heater apparently to keep the floor clear. These heaters really don't work well at all. I'll take them apart and see what I can do but so far I'd hate to have to depend on them in the winter.
I like the liquid fuel idea for heat. The wabasto sounds pretty efficient. I just didn't want to use on board power to run a heater fan through the night during the winter.
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Old 05-19-2016, 10:23 PM   #19
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Last year while I was going over the Rockies in a mostly uninsulated bus, I got a little desperate for a heat source to use on the road, (currently he heater cores are not installed in the bus). I happened to have a very miniature two burner stove from a camper. I took it apart to the basic components and bent a piec of sheet metal in a full arch over the whole thing. Attached it with sheet metal screws. I had some extra stovepipe and 90 degree elbows I put a 4 inch elbow one end angled downand a one foot section on the left side. I bolted it down partially under the glove box on the right side of the dash up front. The heat flows out of the one foot section from convective flow, and with the curtain to the back pulled shut, I stayed nice and warm enough to be in a t shirt. I used a piece of dog crate to form a cage around it. For those who are thinking omg that's not safe, my propane tank mounts outside the bus, and is very secure and I have a regulator with a safety cutoff type valve. Obviously this was a temporary solution however the principle still interests me. Using both burners sometimes I was able to get days and days of continuous use. If I were to place a larger, finned thermal mass in the burn chamber with the burners, it could be turned way down and be way more efficient. I also wondered about adding more ducting to pipe the heat around more and adding a fan, more than likely I will simply reinstalled the heater cores by next winter.
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Old 05-19-2016, 10:46 PM   #20
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The Alaska trick is to invert 6 or 8" clay flower pots over the burners. Not exactly good for while you're traveling. It changes the type of radiation from whatever propane is to radiant heat like from a wood stove. You can feel the difference. Start heating the flower pots slowly so the humidity in the clay doesn't crack the flower pots.
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