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Old 01-26-2015, 10:40 AM   #51
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You can definitely use open rivets outside--even though I don't think it lookds the best. My last carpenter used them from the factory! I can see the potential for problems, but if the rivets are stainless steel or aluminum, and as long as the arbor doesn't get accidentally pulled through, you should be leak/rust free.
If I could have, I would have definitely preferred to use bucked rivets on my bus, but not only did I not have access to the backs of rivets in a lot of places, I also didnt have access to another set of hands to hold the bucking bar.
And I definitely wouldn't worry about leaks, as long as you're keeping the spans inbetween rivets to just a few inches and use either an automotive panel adhesive or seam sealer where things overlap. Rivets are super strong in this application!
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:52 AM   #52
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well if buying ahead and doing it right go with a closed back, mandrel type of rivet.
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Old 01-26-2015, 03:31 PM   #53
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I currently live in a 16 foot section of bus. I have lived in it full time since mid September of this year. I also spent December, and January of 2011 in it. I live completely off grid, with one wood stove in the middle. Floor is not insulated, with fist size holes in it. Walls are insulated on the outside of the bus walls, with 6 inch fiberglass batting. Roof has a bit more.

There is no way you will need more than one wood stove.

I live near Edmonton Alberta Canada. I used to burn wood, but now burn 99% coal, with only a few pieces of broken pallets to flair the fire up faster in the morning. After burning coal, I don't want to burn wood anymore. Wood was 4 hours max between loadings. Coal is 12 to 24 hours between loadings.

Good luck, and take care.

Nat
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Old 01-26-2015, 04:02 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
well if buying ahead and doing it right go with a closed back, mandrel type of rivet.
I guess what I meant by 'open' was a 'pop' rivet.

I dont think I've ever seen a rivet with hole in it by design that isn't filled by the mandrel (I was calling it an arbor, whooops!).
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Old 01-26-2015, 04:08 PM   #55
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This is a closed end mandrel rivet.


This is an open end mandrel rivet
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Old 01-26-2015, 05:59 PM   #56
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Hell yeah! Shoot, I wish I had known about that when I was doing mine! Thanks for the lesson.

Live and learn...

I'll use the closed ends on my next bus ;)
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Old 01-26-2015, 06:21 PM   #57
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The closed ones are a bit tougher to find.
They're what's used on the exterior of buses at the factory.
I'm new to riveting, and only learned about these recently myself. Learn something new every day!
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Old 01-26-2015, 07:30 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
There is no way you will need more than one wood stove.

I live near Edmonton Alberta Canada. I used to burn wood, but now burn 99% coal, with only a few pieces of broken pallets to flair the fire up faster in the morning. After burning coal, I don't want to burn wood anymore. Wood was 4 hours max between loadings. Coal is 12 to 24 hours between loadings.

Good luck, and take care.

Nat
My main thinking was that if I could get a small stove in the bedroom that we could load it up with wood and heat a little more efficiently, we wouldn't have to get the main one heating up hot enough to warm the bus all the way back to the bedroom, all night. I could get out of bed if it gets to cold and toss on a log or two. Now, I am considering dropping that money on a nicer stove with thick walls and rearrange the floor plan a bit so that the bedroom and living room/kitchen are adjacent and the stove would heat them both effectively.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
The closed ones are a bit tougher to find.
They're what's used on the exterior of buses at the factory.
I'm new to riveting, and only learned about these recently myself. Learn something new every day!
Thanks, this will be what I'l have to keep an eye out for. I am glad to see more things that I can tackle myself.
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Old 01-26-2015, 07:45 PM   #59
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You could always make some kind of boiler configuration and use your stove to heat water and then pipe it back to a radiator in your bedroom. Sounds crazy but its something id like to do. Thats what got me into the "hobbit" woodstove. It has a boiler option. Sexy sexy woodburning
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:02 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
I currently live in a 16 foot section of bus. I have lived in it full time since mid September of this year. I also spent December, and January of 2011 in it. I live completely off grid, with one wood stove in the middle. Floor is not insulated, with fist size holes in it. Walls are insulated on the outside of the bus walls, with 6 inch fiberglass batting. Roof has a bit more.

There is no way you will need more than one wood stove.

I live near Edmonton Alberta Canada. I used to burn wood, but now burn 99% coal, with only a few pieces of broken pallets to flair the fire up faster in the morning. After burning coal, I don't want to burn wood anymore. Wood was 4 hours max between loadings. Coal is 12 to 24 hours between loadings.

Good luck, and take care.

Nat
glad to see you back nat. looking forward to your posts.
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