Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-10-2015, 02:03 PM   #1
Almost There
 
ii_amnt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: South Carolina, but headed back to Michigan
Posts: 84
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International
Engine: DT360
Insulation for Northern Winters

My family and I are intending to live in our future bus full-time. We will be moving up to Michigan and possibly the Upper Peninsula after that. This means very cold winters. When we acquire our bus (still looking!), closing off some windows and insulating it is the number one priority. There are essentially three ideas I have for dealing with winter.

The first is closing off about half of the windows, welding them shut with sheet metal and grinding off rivets and putting in some (r-30?) rockwool insulation on all the walls and ceiling and recovering with wood. One concern I have is preventing condensation. Maybe put in some vapor barrier? I am not sure what order this would be (steel shell-vapor barrier-insulation-wood? steel shell-insulation-vaporbarrier-wood?).

The second is foam insulation on the floor with radiant heating. I hear you can do this with a wood stove, which leads me to...

The third idea, a good wood stove towards the middle-back of the bus (bedrooms are in the back). With some thermal mass around it, probably some bricks. Of course, I would put up a couple carbon-monoxide detectors.

I tried doing a search for people who live in their skoolie full time in the north, but didn't find much. Any advice?
ii_amnt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 07:23 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,962
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
Welcome--and don't use rockwool. Remember, rockwool can't be compressed and r-30 would require about 6" of between wall space. Since this will be your home, use the good stuff: spray in foam. Read up here on insulation etc. You'll save a lot of trouble later on. Jack
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 08:29 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ii_amnt View Post
My family and I are intending to live in our future bus full-time. We will be moving up to Michigan and possibly the Upper Peninsula after that. This means very cold winters. When we acquire our bus (still looking!), closing off some windows and insulating it is the number one priority. There are essentially three ideas I have for dealing with winter.

The first is closing off about half of the windows, welding them shut with sheet metal and grinding off rivets and putting in some (r-30?) rockwool insulation on all the walls and ceiling and recovering with wood. One concern I have is preventing condensation. Maybe put in some vapor barrier? I am not sure what order this would be (steel shell-vapor barrier-insulation-wood? steel shell-insulation-vaporbarrier-wood?).

The second is foam insulation on the floor with radiant heating. I hear you can do this with a wood stove, which leads me to...

The third idea, a good wood stove towards the middle-back of the bus (bedrooms are in the back). With some thermal mass around it, probably some bricks. Of course, I would put up a couple carbon-monoxide detectors.

I tried doing a search for people who live in their skoolie full time in the north, but didn't find much. Any advice?
Since you have the time to plan ahead- replace all the leaky non-insulated windows with nice modern RV units.
Closed cell foam insulation is the best thing for doing the ceiling and walls. I've thought about using Rockwool inside between rooms in interior walls due to its inability to burn.
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 09:04 PM   #4
Almost There
 
ii_amnt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: South Carolina, but headed back to Michigan
Posts: 84
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International
Engine: DT360
Jack, thank you for that. I narrowed my forum search to "spray foam insulation" and found some good stuff on that. I think I will hire a local contractor to do the spray foam. If I line all or every other rib with an extra inch or two of wood and have them spray in that, that should do well to prevent the metal ribs from conducting cold to the inside and give some extra room for more insulation.

Better windows did cross my mind, but I wasn't sure how to do that. Maybe I can find some rv window suppliers and find the size I need, all the windows will be framed in with wood.

Another thing would to add some kind of movable wall or sliding door or thick curtains to block off the very front drivers portion of the bus, lots of heat to be lost there.
ii_amnt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 09:19 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,962
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
Hey ia, if you go the curtain route try adding a layer of bubble wrap between the inner and outer surfaces. Trapped air is a good insulator.
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 09:21 PM   #6
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Myself and some others go with a partition wall right behind the drivers seat. That way the bugs have two doors to get through!
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2015, 10:47 AM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ii_amnt View Post
I think I will hire a local contractor to do the spray foam. If I line all or every other rib with an extra inch or two of wood and have them spray in that, that should do well to prevent the metal ribs from conducting cold to the inside and give some extra room for more insulation.
+1 on that! The DIY spray foam kits are messy and wasteful. I wish I would have hired a pro to do the job.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2015, 11:15 AM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
Hey ia, if you go the curtain route try adding a layer of bubble wrap between the inner and outer surfaces. Trapped air is a good insulator.
yessir.. I've been researching thermal fabrics to make curtains out of as a more elegant, albeit expensive solution. Here is a link with a discussion of a few options: http://www.sew4home.com/tips-resourc...-and-cold-cold

The ones with a foil center are seem like a good option.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2015, 11:18 AM   #9
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
+1 on that! The DIY spray foam kits are messy and wasteful. I wish I would have hired a pro to do the job.
How much did you spend doing it yourself?
I don't mind a wasteful mess, I've got a ton of time on my hands.
I only ask because I want the benefits of spray foam but simply cannot afford to pay someone a ton of money to do it. Just weighing my options.
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2015, 11:29 AM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Well, I'll tell you this: I thought I could do the job with one kit. Kits are $600. One kit seemed about perfect after running through the online calculators. However, since it was my first time working with the stuff and you have to move fast so that the guns doesn't clog I ended up overspraying some areas and underspraying others. This resulted in the need to purchase a second kit, which put it over the price that a contractor could have done it.

Watch some youtube videos of people doing it. I did and upon seeing the tough time people were having and the inconsistent results (especially when spraying overhead) I thought, "well heck, these people are just morons! I can certainly do a better job!". Turns out, I didn't do a better job my first time through. The second kit filled in all the areas that were too low, though, and I was better at it having experience from the first kit. The thing is, I would have been happy never having the experience. The chances are I'll never do this job again myself.

Then, when it comes to trimming, I ended up with garbage bag after garbage bag of the trimmed product. I was essentially throwing away garbage bags of money.

Spray foam is a big business these days. Prices are competitive. A contractor will give you a quote and usually can't go over that quote. The DIY kits are a gamble and can really bite you in the ass. If your bus is mobile you may be able to shave some cash off of the quote by showing up at a job site where the contractor is already working.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.