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Old 04-18-2019, 09:42 AM   #1
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more foam in ceiling or rigid in floor?

So, I'm a tall guy & no roof raise. Maybe next time for that. I will be rubbing my head & slouching some no matter what, which is OK. I've done it my whole life on workboats.

We are DIY spray foaming the walls & ceiling, XPS on the floor. We will be travelling in all climates, hopefully more in warm than cold as I've grown up and lived in cold most of my life. Our primary heat source will be a wood stove.

Where should I put my last inch of insulation? In the floor or on the ceiling? I'll go no less than 1" rigid in the floor. If I go with 1.5 or 2", the extra will probably come off the ceiling. Any one have some post insulation/living experience that left them perfectly happy or bummed that they didn't do something different? Am I splitting hairs?

Thoughts?
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:21 AM   #2
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If heating in cold conditions, put on ceiling.

If aircon used in the heat, put on floor.

If both are of equal concern, do both or flip a coin.
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Old 04-18-2019, 11:01 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
If heating in cold conditions, put on ceiling.

If aircon used in the heat, put on floor.

If both are of equal concern, do both or flip a coin.
Yeah, the coin flip is about where I'm at. I'm leaning toward the floor mostly because the extra inch is easier & cheaper to deal with down there.
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Old 04-18-2019, 11:56 AM   #4
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The center of the roof can easily be insulated from the outside..especially if you put solar on top as well. If you spray foam diy then I would spray foam the bottom..relocated some tubing and wiring and stay away from the exhaust.
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Old 04-18-2019, 03:14 PM   #5
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Your woodstove will generate quite a bit of heat which will rise naturally. I have found no problems keeping the ceiling really warm and it seems the floor area is much cooler, especially the first couple of feet up. Might make for cooler sleeping and cold feet. I'd add to the floor in your case, wish I had but may in future.


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Old 04-18-2019, 03:24 PM   #6
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Yes with a woodstove, R-value is less critical than with burning diesel or propane.

Of greater concern would be infiltration of cold air, from incomplete or insufficient vapor barrier.

Cold is not rising up from a lower R-value floor, but entering from anywhere will by default fall to the floor.

Little low consumption fans can even out that thermal stratification issue.
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Old 04-18-2019, 07:10 PM   #7
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Your woodstove will generate quite a bit of heat which will rise naturally.

John
Heat does not rise. If it did, it would only be hot above the woodstove.

Hot air rises. Heat goes in all directions.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:06 PM   #8
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Heat does not rise. If it did, it would only be hot above the woodstove.

Hot air rises. Heat goes in all directions.

Good catch, my bad! Does the heat need a push from the hot air

to dissipate or move throughout the bus?



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Old 04-18-2019, 10:56 PM   #9
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Radiant heat is like light, travels in a straight line, warms the dark surfaces, bounces off the reflective ones.

Heat conduction travels through a material, including out the other side.

Convection is carried by moving air - heat rises, cold falls, both travel through any gaps in the space "envelope".

Slowing down or facilitating each process requires different approaches.
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Old 04-18-2019, 11:21 PM   #10
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Good catch, my bad! Does the heat need a push from the hot air

to dissipate or move throughout the bus?



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https://www.herschel-infrared.com/ho...nvection-heat/
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