Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-01-2005, 12:11 PM   #1
Bus Nut
 
captainkf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Rossland BC, Canada
Posts: 433
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: 366 propane
Rated Cap: 56
reefer unit as geni?

I am wondering if any of you have any experience with the generators and fridge units for comercial reefer's? I have seen small ones for cube trucks, semi's and cargo container ships. The fact that they run off diesel and are common seems that they might be a viable alternative to the traditional generator. They are sold at very resonable prices. One could even buy a larger unit with a smaller fridge so you could cool your bus and use the extra juice for whatever needs it.

So, what do you think?

-Richard
captainkf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2005, 03:56 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Idaho
Posts: 448
I know of a few people that have done that. The reefer trucks usually have a Kuboda engine in them. And like you said they can be had for near nothin. If you want I can try to find the email address for one of the guys that have built one.
busone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2005, 11:10 PM   #3
Bus Nut
 
captainkf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Rossland BC, Canada
Posts: 433
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: 366 propane
Rated Cap: 56
That would be great! Since I live on the ocean now, I have more access to comercial reefer units. Although I just looked on ebay and saw entire transport trailers with working reefer units for under $4000. Thanks! -Richard
captainkf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2005, 12:06 AM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Idaho
Posts: 448
I sent you a PM with some info. It includes a link to another board so I did not post it publicly.
busone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2005, 01:20 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
captainkf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Rossland BC, Canada
Posts: 433
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: 366 propane
Rated Cap: 56
Reefer geni

Thanks! I'll keep you posted if anything comes of it. -Richard
captainkf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2005, 10:43 PM   #6
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
One thing to consider is the speed of the engine, and the noise level. A refer truck parks outside the building i work in once a year for a weekend. (it's for a festival) It is so loud that when it starts up, we can't sleep through it. (I get to sleep at work) I don't know if all the refer trucks are that way or if they make quieter ones.

Speed is a big factor too. Almost all generator heads are designed spin at 3,600 rpm. Some bigger heavier ones are designed to spin at 1,800 which is more desirable. The speed of the engine when coupled to the geni needs to be within 10% to keep the proper hz or cycles per minute. A lot of appliances won't work long at 50 hz, or 70 hz (although more will work at 50 hz, since this is what most the rest of the world utilizes. A lot of devices are stamped 50/60 hz.) Don't use 50 hz on an electric motor designed for 60, it'll get hot and burn up in short order.

Most rpm govenor's designed for non generator use do not have the tollerances to spin an engine within 10% of the target speed.

A simple easy method is to use the motor spin a big alternator. You can then charge batteries, and run an inverter(s). The speed of the engine could be matched to load of the alternator helping to make things more efficient. But you'd prob still burn close to 1/2 gallon per hour of fuel. Although i have to say i don't know how many hours per gallon an engine like that is designed for....

Or............

you could spend $857.00 and buy a honda eu2000 shipped to your house with no tax, no shipping. It'll run up to 15 hours on 1 gallon of fuel, you never have to tinker with the thing, it's light, portable, and extremely quiet. These "generators" are actually an alternator and an inverter and a computer matches the speed of the engine to the load placed on it by the alternator.

IF you ran an engine for 25 days straight (which i know you're not gonna do.....) @ 1/2 gallon per hour, you'd spend $900 on fuel. You'd spend $120 during the same time period on fuel for the honda eu. It might take a while with your usage habbits, but long term you would be money ahead to use the more efficient honda.

I don't have any relationship to honda, I just think these honda geni's are the greatest thing since sliced bread. Expensive but well worth the money. I have one and i left it running for almost 11 days straight while at burningman. I used far less than 20 gallons of fuel.

Just my $.02
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2005, 10:47 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
here's a link to the cheapst place on the net i've found for the honda eu

http://mayberrys.com/
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2005, 12:02 AM   #8
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Idaho
Posts: 448
Here is what one of the guys that built one had to say. I asked the question on another board who had built their own. If you want to ask him any questions just email me and I will forward them to him. I am not sure if he would want me posting his email address.

Quote:
"I used a ThermoKing reefer engine for my 9KW genset. It is an Isuzu C201, 2 litre, 27 HP @ 2300RPM. Using a French made LeRoi-Sommer 3600 RPM alternator and a Type "B" drive belt, I adjusted the pulley sizes so that the motor is turning 1340 RPM and the alternator at 3655 to produce a nice clean 60 Hertz (cycles). It has a mechanical governor, and enough excess torque that it never even burps going from no load to 65 amps in one flick of the switch during initial testing.
It has never varied more than 1.5 Hertz under any load, and is clean enough to power my fridge, MW, and new 3.4 gig HP computer with no problem. I used Schedule 80 iron pipe for the first 6 feet of exhaust to help quieten the gas pulses, then used galvanized conduit for the balance of the exhaust. It ends near the rear wheels with a pipe union, so I can quickly attach a riser when in a park or at a rally.
The radiator is a three core unit from a '91 VW Jetta. Very compact, closely shrouded, with a two speed motor and a N.O. temp. switch that closes at 205 F. which works out to be ideal as an overtemp. shutdown switch for the genset.
Glad to answer any questions off the 'Board. BTW, it's going on it's third year and still fine. After Hurricanes Charlie and Francis in Ft. Myers Florida last year, it ran non-stop for 9 days, providing baby bottle warming, cell phone charging, and hot water showers for the folks in my park and the one adjacent to it across the street.
busone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2005, 04:39 PM   #9
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
An added bonus i didn't think about earlier....

if the refer engine you use is liquid cooled like the one above, to improve overall efficiency, you can use the engine coolant to make hot water for showers, and even to make hot air for heating the inside of your skoolie during the cold months.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2005, 11:30 AM   #10
Bus Nut
 
captainkf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Rossland BC, Canada
Posts: 433
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: 366 propane
Rated Cap: 56
Thanks for the info. Greatly appreciated. I am still very intruiged by the idea. It seems a bit complicated, however it will work.

I would purchase a small honda eu unit if $$ was not as big of an issue. I do like them. They are very very quite. I do have a 1.4kw geni now but it is old and not powerfull enough to run much other than a charger and small appliances. So I'm not desperate for one RIGHT NOW, but would like a larger one for use in the spring to power the bus after the next round of conversions.

The possibility of having a 10kw geni for under $1000 is nice and tempting.

- Richard
captainkf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TELMA unit fishphart Classifieds | Buy, Sell, Swap 0 01-26-2012 11:16 AM
AC unit location Diddly Conversion General Discussions 4 06-27-2011 12:14 PM
Getting roof A/C unit on top of the bus bapos Conversion General Discussions 6 06-12-2011 11:36 PM
Do I really need the lower AC unit? Diesel Dan Conversion General Discussions 9 08-24-2010 01:35 PM
Gas powerd roof a/c unit JonCBrand Conversion General Discussions 7 01-24-2007 12:10 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.