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Old 09-12-2015, 12:04 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Roof A/C installation - Help!

I have a question regarding roof A/C installation on my Bluebird All American Bus.

I was not planning on removing the inside roof panels and leaving them intact since they are very nice. However, I'm realizing the A/C cannot be installed inside emergency hatch without major modifications. Does anyone have any suggestions on installing the roof A/C without removing a million rivets and leaving the inner roof intact?






Thank you
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Old 09-12-2015, 12:13 AM   #2
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Gross

Them panels need to come out.

Go do some reading in this thread.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/in...tml#post123679

Do not fear work. It's good for you, and it sets the bond between you and your bus. Kind of like changing you baby's poopy diaper.


Nat
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Old 09-12-2015, 09:46 AM   #3
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Nat,

Thanks for the info.

If I'm able to save the ceiling, would I be able to reinstall it after insulating it? Or could I reattach it with screws instead of rivets?
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Old 09-12-2015, 10:26 AM   #4
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Take a look at my thread. I just got done installing the A/C last weekend. I marked the hole (14.25" +/- 0.125" square if I remember correctly). I drilled four holes in the corners with a hole saw. Then I cut the square out with a sawsall. One of us was on the roof doing the cutting while the other was underneath with a piece of wood holding pressure next to the saw blade so it didn't vibrate too much. We riveted some 2x2 hollow steel tubing into place to keep the top skin of sheet metal from crushing the bottom skin when we tightened the bolts. We also taped it really good with aluminum tape.

Here's the link: http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/be...tml#post122984
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Old 09-12-2015, 10:29 AM   #5
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You don't have to take the sheet metal out. Some people in this group think that's the only way to go. It doesn't work for me and my schedule, so I'm not doing it. I've got a 1988 blue bird and the insulation in that little square of roof was as clean as it was 27 years ago.
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Old 09-12-2015, 10:33 AM   #6
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Many have tried, but it never go's back on without looking horrible. It's also nearly impossible to get back up there due to the curve of the roof, and none of the holes will line up.

To make matters worse, the metal will render any insulation behind it pointless due to the thermal transfer through the metal.

We have covered this topic a few times on this site in great detail.

Best head over to the build thread section and start reading. All the real info and experience is there.

I love the build thread section. I personally read every build thread posted here. Everyone is a great read.

What is your intended use for the bus? That makes a big difference how to go about the conversion.

With no metal ceiling, and better insulation, it takes less than half the AC to cool the same bus. That's something some members can't seem to wrap their head around.

Nat
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Old 09-12-2015, 12:56 PM   #7
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I intend to use the bus as an RV to travel across the country and sometimes for people to stay over. I am in SW Florida where it's warm and sunny most of the year. Currently, the average roof temperature (white paint) is 107 deg. F, and the yellow roof portion is 115 deg. F. I'm currently debating on getting one roof unit with 15k BTUs or 2 units with 13.5 BTUs. each. I am also considering spray foaming the ceiling considering the foam board will be good enough to use 1 A/C unit instead of 2.

Any thought? Ideas?
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Old 09-12-2015, 01:27 PM   #8
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I'd definitely go with two units here in the sunshine state.
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Old 09-12-2015, 02:15 PM   #9
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One other thing to think about. The fibreglass that bus manufacturers use isn't the greatest to begin with. Pulling down the panels, then replacing the fibreglass with a higher R-value insulation will help keep the interior cooler for longer, without running constantly. Plus, there's *always* the potential for mold in the batting, and do you *really* want to be breathing that in?
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Old 09-12-2015, 04:22 PM   #10
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Now that we know your in the sunshine state, not removing the ceiling and insulating properly would be a big mistake.

Without proper insulation in that climate, that bus will cook you alive.

Even with 6 AC units on top blowing cold air, you will not overcome the radiant heat.

Nat
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