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Old 05-21-2019, 01:02 PM   #1
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Securing Gas Line

I'm running a length of 3/8" copper roll to plumb my propane tank. Needs to go up a frame rail about 16'. I plan on running it through a piece of 1/2" braided vinyl hose to absorb any vibrations. Does this sound feasible?
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:45 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
I'm running a length of 3/8" copper roll to plumb my propane tank. Needs to go up a frame rail about 16'. I plan on running it through a piece of 1/2" braided vinyl hose to absorb any vibrations. Does this sound feasible?
sounds like sound plan to me
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Old 05-21-2019, 03:15 PM   #3
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Are you running it through tubing the entire length? I guess you’re doing that to avoid abrasion? I think that any place you pass through a framing member you’ll want to pay extra attention to avoid abrasion by using a bushing on the framing member and using rubber-sleeved clamps to secure the tubing and avoid vibrations.

What grade of tubing are you using? Type L or K is allowed per NFPA 1192

How are you making junctions?
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Old 05-21-2019, 04:41 PM   #4
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There will be one piece of copper line running 16' to where it enters the cabin. I have a 18' piece of 5/8"od x 1/2"id, clear vinyl tubing encasing the copper. I can either ty-wrap it to the holes in the floor seams, or with some extra labor, adding these PEX hangers. Once it come through the floor it will "T" off, one going to the stove, the other across the floor where it will "T" to both water heaters.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:34 AM   #5
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Hi Marc,

I was thinking about the vinyl sleeve idea. A couple things came to mind.

If that sleeve extends into the cabin and something happens to the copper, like a stress crack or a puncture (reasons for protecting it) then the vinyl tube could pipe the gas into the cabin. So maybe it’s better that if you decide to use it, that the vinyl terminates outside?

The vinyl tubing can harbor moisture. You might think that’s not a problem because copper pipe carries water all day long, but if it’s contaminated with something corrosive then it wouldn’t have a way to drain and would just sit there and eat the copper.

So maybe sealing the ends with a sealant would be good?

And here’s my $.02 on material choice: 1/2” galvanized pipe running from propane tank to appliance points, with a valve at each appliance and a flare fitting transitioning to copper for the final 2 feet.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:05 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
Hi Marc,

I was thinking about the vinyl sleeve idea. A couple things came to mind.

If that sleeve extends into the cabin and something happens to the copper, like a stress crack or a puncture (reasons for protecting it) then the vinyl tube could pipe the gas into the cabin. So maybe it’s better that if you decide to use it, that the vinyl terminates outside?

The vinyl tubing can harbor moisture. You might think that’s not a problem because copper pipe carries water all day long, but if it’s contaminated with something corrosive then it wouldn’t have a way to drain and would just sit there and eat the copper.

So maybe sealing the ends with a sealant would be good?

And here’s my $.02 on material choice: 1/2” galvanized pipe running from propane tank to appliance points, with a valve at each appliance and a flare fitting transitioning to copper for the final 2 feet.
Plans are to terminate the hose before it enters the cabin, I'll have some other source for anti abrasion as it comes through the floor. I like the idea of silicone sealing the ends, I'll do that. If my run was straight to the stove, I would have considered hard pipe. But I have to go right past all the suspension against that side, wheel and everything in the way. To accomplish that with hard pipe would require multiple connections if which I would not entertain at all. There's 5 bends in my pipe.
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Old 05-24-2019, 12:02 AM   #7
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Do NOT use galvanized piping. The galvanization reacts with propane. Use black pipe instead
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