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Old 03-09-2016, 03:34 PM   #1
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Wood Stove Advice?

Hi All,

I'm currently looking into a wood stove to put in my bus in the somewhat distant future.

I figure before making rash decisions on my own it could be within my best interest to consult the skoolie community.

I found this stove locally, and the owner said he could have it delivered near me for $100.
Free standing wood stove

My other option I was considering would be a mini stove such as this tiny cubicministove.
Cubic Mini Wood Stoves - CB-1008 "CUB" Cubic Mini Wood Stove

In my mind:
Craigslist stove:
Pros: More space to enjoy a fire, less log prep needed, probably sturdier, more economical.

Cons: Really heavy(200lb-ish), takes up more space, probably less efficient.

Ministove:
Pros: very compact, lightweight, more efficient, small logs will be easier to store.

cons: Demands log prep, more expensive

Anyway I am sure there is a lot I am not thinking about, so I was hoping for the skoolie communities input.
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Old 03-10-2016, 02:26 PM   #2
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There's also these.

Technical Specs - GrayStove.com

Where are you located??
I picked up these 2 stoves in the midwest for a great price.
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Old 03-10-2016, 03:05 PM   #3
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Most of these smaller wood stoves can hold an actual heating fire for only about two hours burning wood. You can get them to hold a fire for up to 5 hours but you're not getting much heat from it. Some of these smaller stoves have a water jacket built into the firebox which can be very handy. As you mentioned, cutting small wood for a small stove is a real pain.

I went through this same thought process. These small antique stoves are kind of cute, but they have loose plates on top that make noise. You can get by with a cute antique stove, and I've used similar stoves for a number of years. Most of these small antique stoves are actually designed to burn coal, giving them a nice long burn time. It's simply hard to build a wood fire vertically in a small stove, and next to impossible if your wood isn't nice and dry.

I chose an airtight medium size, actual designed for wood, stove. I can actually shut it down and the fire will die out. It can hold a fire for an easy 10 hours or more. Another thing that made me decide on this stove was a pedestal that could easily be bolted to the floor. I don't want a wood stove hitting me in the back of the head during a crash.

A real wood stove is multiple times more efficient than an antique stove. It all comes down to personal preference and your actual climatic conditions. I find a real wood stove much easier to cook or heat water with than the antique stoves.
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Old 03-10-2016, 04:36 PM   #4
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Not to highjack the thread, but I've oftened wondered if it's possible/safe/not really stupid to try to burn your woodstove while in motion. Does anyone do that?
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Old 03-10-2016, 04:46 PM   #5
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Good question about using the stove in motion. I have a friend who has a stove that burns dried corn. Per him, it is cheaper than wood and it runs 6-7 hours on a load of corn. It is designed like a pellet stove with a feeder, but the dried corn (again, per him) is cheaper per btu than other options. Some of the stoves you have pictured here or on CL are probably not air tight.
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Old 03-10-2016, 05:49 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dan-fox View Post
Not to highjack the thread, but I've oftened wondered if it's possible/safe/not really stupid to try to burn your woodstove while in motion. Does anyone do that?
Bad idea, at speed the motion of air over the chimney will create a vacuum inside the stove and cause it to #1 overheat like a mofo, like the stove turns cherry red hot... and #2 it will most likely turn the inside of your bus into a huge ashtray... you can.... but I wouldn't recommend it...
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Old 03-10-2016, 07:27 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dan-fox View Post
Not to highjack the thread, but I've oftened wondered if it's possible/safe/not really stupid to try to burn your woodstove while in motion. Does anyone do that?
Also law enforcement proably wouldn't be to keen on seeing hot embers blowing out of the chimney,Especially here in Ca.
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Old 03-10-2016, 10:00 PM   #8
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All these things are true if the circumstances are right.

If you're using your wood stove while you're traveling you must be pretty darn cold, because the bus heaters are usually fairly adequate while you're traveling. If you're in a blizzard I don't think anyone is going to gripe about your wood stove.

Concerning creating a vacuum through your stove pipe while traveling, it completely depends on how you set it up so as usual common sense goes a long way. If it had an unlimited supply of wood and oxygen it could surely overheat, but why would there be an unlimited amount of fuel in the stove while you're going down the highway or any other time, vacuum or no vacuum.

The hippies used wood stoves in the bus while traveling back in the 60s, and they found that charcoal briquettes were actually a more discrete way of staying warm while in town.
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:05 PM   #9
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Thank you everyone! Stu & Filo: I'm just south of Seattle, those are cute stoves how much makes them a good price?

Robin97396: Thank you for your wisdom, I will try to delegate some space for a real wood stove. Though I may learn about the tiny stoves the hard way if I can't make the necessary space.

dan-fox: Thank you for hijacking my thread and breathing some life into it, thanks to you I got to learn that I shouldn't drive with a flame in the bus (probably). (Thank you to Slaughridge for that).

Much learned, I guess for now I will sit tight on the wood stove until I can make space outside the bus to store it/inside the bus to keep it. It's not like I need heat until September anyway.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:10 PM   #10
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The one on the right I paid $80.00 the one on the left $100.00,picked them up at a auction in Ill. I have family there so went back in Nov for Thanksgiving, rented a trailer which cost me $400.00 BUT I also picked up another stove for $80.00 while back there brought it to Ca sold it for $800.00, didn't make back everything I spent but we were going anyway.
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