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Old 11-03-2005, 09:39 AM   #21
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I've seen rigs that had the cold air return for their forced-air furnace ducted through the insulated 'basement' bays they had their tanks in. That way the ambiant air already used to heat the bus was used to keep the tanks warm.

They simply put a floor register(s) in to let the air into the tank area, and took the cold air input for the heater INTERIOR air from the tank area.
NEVER USE THE EXTERNAL VENT (EXHAUST) TO HEAT THE TANKS, OR DUCT IT INTO THE VEHICLE!!!! CARBON MONOXIDE WILL KILL YOU.

Obviously, the tanks were insulated: there was an insulated and weatherstripped door to access the drain(s).

Make sure you have a way to vacuum out the space from time to time, as dust and other ook will make it's way down there through the cold air register

Many put their fresh water tanks under the bed, it helps reduce the 'head' or lift that the water pump has to overcome.

One other advantage to having the tank(s) in the heated space is THERMAL MASS. This is the amount of mass that is at temp already, and it resists changes in temperature, reducing temp swings in the living space.
Anyone that's lived in a masonry home knows this; that heap of stone/brick/etc. takes a while to change temperature.
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Old 11-03-2005, 06:12 PM   #22
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Year: 1985
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re: tanks

Keeping the fresh tanks in the bedroom is the current plan. It just makes sense on so many levels.

The vents to basment spaces is very interesting. A great option when boondocking in the winter when I won't want to run a bunch of electrical heating. Thanks!

-Richard
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Old 12-01-2005, 07:53 AM   #23
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Some nice guy posted this link to some wonderful little woodstoves designed for boats on another forum….
http://www.marinestove.com/index.htm

Wish I knew they still made stoves like this , I would have bought one instead of the one I did…they’re a perfect size for installing in a Bus.
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Old 12-01-2005, 10:21 AM   #24
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woodstove

Thanks! The info is useful because I am still hunting out the right stove. I am a bit unsatisified with what I have found used. I am sure they would be fine in a garage or some other fixed building but I am not comfortable puting an old cast iron beast in a metal tube that travels around at 65 mph. Even if it is bolted down.

I am looking into the original Lunnenberg foundry since it's located only 45 minutes away. Mabye I can find an older model taken out of a boat or in an antique shop that is in clean working condition. I'd love a new one but $650 usd plus shipping is out of my working budget right now.

Thanks again.

-Richard
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Old 12-01-2005, 11:00 AM   #25
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Wood stove installation regulations

I came across this info from the site above. There has been much speculation out there about what is the "right" way to install a solid fuel stove. Here are the instalation instructions and guidlines for boats. I think it's a very usefull resource.

http://www.marinestove.com/manual.htm

-Richard
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Old 12-02-2005, 02:08 AM   #26
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I am no expert but it seems to me a marine installation is slightly different than a bus. Boats don't have panic stops from 60 mph. Of course buses don't get tossed around by the sea either.
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Old 12-02-2005, 08:14 AM   #27
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Just bolt the thing down....
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Old 12-02-2005, 09:45 AM   #28
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I am building mine out of 1/4 in plate steel. The door I am buying because even the plate steel could warp and cause a loss in sealing the door. I am installing a 2" or 3" Draft tube that goes through the wall of my bus, directly into the back of the stove. With a damper on the main flue, this should be all that is needed for combustion control
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Old 12-05-2005, 07:15 AM   #29
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You don't need to build tanks!!!

Look into wrecked/junked RVs for tanks. They will have fresh tanks that you can used for black/gray tanks, you just have to change or install the appropriate fittings and valves.

I frequently see wrecks and retired RVs in auto boneyards. Sinks, tanks, water pumps, propane regulators (including those PRICEY auto-changeover ones), stoves, water heaters...heck, I regularly pull the flare nuts ($1 each!) off the junkers to reuse for my needs...I'm stockpiling until I acquire my bus and can start building.

Windows, roof vents, rooftop AC units, awnings.....search for treasure and you WILL find it.

JUST missed a large late '70's RV for $100 that had a REALLY nice Kohler genny in it.
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Old 12-05-2005, 11:36 AM   #30
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I got a really nice 1,800 rpm kohnler gennie for free from a motorhome a couple years back. Cast iron, single cylinder super quiet. you could look at it and tell it was Heavy duty. Emphasis on heavy! They loaded it into the bed of my pickup with a front end loader. I'm guessing it weighed 300 pounds or more.

It ended up falling off the bus sometime later because of poor installation techniques....

I would guess that it would have ran for thousands of hours before needing a rebuild.
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