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Old 10-24-2016, 01:47 PM   #41
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Year: 1991
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Chassis: International S3800
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heres thr tough part... that oil could be running back from the turbo down into the manifold or being spun into the manifold.. im not sure if you still have the oil line connected to the turbo or not... or what the ramifications of starting an engine wit hthe turbo partially removed are.. someone may have to help here with that..

the curiosity would be if new oil ran out from the manifold or the turbo when the 2 are separated....

the sheer amount of oil involved sure sounds like turbo vs injector O-rings unless there is a cylinder miss and oil is being dumped into a cylinder..

if all 8 were running you wouldnt likely be blowing liquid oil out of the manifold..

-Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:01 PM   #42
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I too agree that the turbo is where I would have thought the issue lay,

I did notice that one of my exhaust flanges is wet with oil....

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Old 10-24-2016, 02:07 PM   #43
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are you talking exhaust flange where it goes into the head?..

I wish i hadnt just sent my bus away so i could look at mine... are the exhaust flanges below the turbo where there couldve been easy run-down after the engine got shut off?

-Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:11 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
are you talking exhaust flange where it goes into the head?..

I wish i hadnt just sent my bus away so i could look at mine... are the exhaust flanges below the turbo where there couldve been easy run-down after the engine got shut off?

-Christopher
Yes, where the exhaust flange meets the head, and no, it is at the rear of the engine, the opposite side from the turbo
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:28 PM   #45
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Ok, so Im now thinking it is coming from the engine, not turbo...

I ran the engine with the manifold-turbo slightly split and the prybar that I used to hold the flanges apart is covered in oil that was blown out of the line. Any oil from the turbo would have been sucked through not blown back down the manifold up pipe. So would the o-rings be the most likely culprit? Would anything else cause this?

The bus starts better than my 2015 F-150 so its super confusing!!
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:42 PM   #46
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Would anyone here know the P/N so I can check if the local autozones etc carry the o-rings? I think I found the ones by searching as a F-250 diesel, but I would like to know for sure before I purchased.

*ANOTHER EDIT*

The local Advanced Auto has the parts in stock and confirmed that its for T444e, so we should be good there.

Any other advice on what to check prior to getting stuck into this injector o-ring change?
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Old 10-24-2016, 03:50 PM   #47
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I was talking wit ha buddy that has a 7.3 and he says be 100% sure its not the turbo... unless you can totally separarte the turbo from the manifold and verify that the oil is in fact running out from the manifold side and that theres no way it is left over or sprayed from the turbo...

when you test ran it with the separation did you have smoke coming from your separation point like oil being burned in the cylinder?

the reason I like t osuspect the injector O-rings vs the valve guide seals is because of how much oil is being blown out at High speed..

the more you mash the accelerator of course the more the turbo spins.. but also the HPOP (high pressure oil pump) pressure goes up..

in these engines the injectors are actuated by the HPOP ,.. that pressure at idle is aroiund 550-600 PSI... when you mash it to the floor that pressure goes up to 1000+ PSI (oil pressure not fuel pressure).. and thats not the oil pressure you see on the dash gauge... it is a secondary pump....

so things add up to the fact you blow lots of oil when on it hard... im just amazed with so much oil that the cylinder still fires and hasnt been hydro-locked and damaged...

a turbo leak on the exhaust side can easily happen and not be on the intake side just yet...

lets play your scenerio though that they put a turbo on because they did the same thing you are doing.. and came to the conclusion there was so much oil i nthe exhaust it had to be the turbo.... when the issue is really something else...

what can fill a cylinder with oil??

1. valve guide seal on the exhaust side? it would have to be REALLY bad or a broken valve almost to get that much oil into the exhaust port or manifold that quick... normally those are a plume of smoke at startup then clean ...

2. Busted oil ring.. broken rings could allow alot of oil in the cylinder however if the oil riung is busted id assume the compression rings would as well.. and we would have a cylinder that doesnt fire.. but was belching oil out of its exhaust valve...

3. Injector O-ring. - oil gets by the O-ring and ends up in the cylinder.. normally a diesel engine is happy burning the oil not belching it out... then again if there is enough of it theoretically that cylionder might not fire and would belch oil.. seems unusual.. normally busted O-rings are accompanied by large plumes of blue (oil) smoke.. which you do have...


compression - not the easiest thing to test on this engine... disconnecting the computer fuses and trying to crank the starter.. listneing for an even cranking sound is a quick-and0dirty compression check.. any inconsistency in the crank sound indicates a cyklinder that has different compression than the others.. any attempt for one cylonder to feel like the engine is trying to "start" it would smoke from your gap and sound like the engine wanted to "catch" may very well mean oil is being pumped into the cylinder..and the cylinder is trying to run.. after all when the computer is disconnected the injectors wont inject any fuel...

im thinking outloud at this point..

-Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 04:14 PM   #48
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Each fuel injector has three o-rings that separate diesel fuel from the high pressure engine oil that fires the injector. A leaky lower ring often shows up as oil residue in the fuel filter canister (fuel bowl) and often, but not always, white smoke at the tailpipe. A leaky upper o-ring shows up as oil coming out of the top of the injector and flowing back into the oil pan (no apparent oil use).

To check the fuel filter canister, screw off the top and pull the fuel filter. If there's no oil in the fuel then the injector O-rings are OK and I'd look at the turbo oil seals. The Ford Powerstroke version of your engine uses a Garrett turbo that's pretty easy to rebuild with common hand tools. I assume the International version uses the same one.

With that much smoke I'd think you should be seeing some oil use on the dipstick.
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Old 10-24-2016, 05:01 PM   #49
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the IHC is a garrett also.. I believe the IHC is just a slightly bigger turbo than the powerstroke but the design is the same on both.
-Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 05:50 PM   #50
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It is indeed a Garrett installed on this bus.

I've tucked her in for the night, the place was locking up for the day so I had to leave. I will check the fuel bowl tomorrow. Either way, I have the valve cover off now anyway.

One thing I noticed was that there was a mark on the valve cover where the one injector has been hitting the cover. This is the same cylinder that has the oil seepage around the exhaust/head flange. Could it be that the injector is not seated properly, allowing oil to pass the o-rings? Eyeballing it, it seems ok, but it caught my attention as there is no sign of that on any other injector.
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