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Old 10-24-2016, 06:06 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deftone View Post
One thing I noticed was that there was a mark on the valve cover where the one injector has been hitting the cover. This is the same cylinder that has the oil seepage around the exhaust/head flange. Could it be that the injector is not seated properly, allowing oil to pass the o-rings? Eyeballing it, it seems ok, but it caught my attention as there is no sign of that on any other injector.

Hmmm. Yeah, if you have the valve cover off I'd check that the bolts that hold the injector down are properly torqued. If they aren't tight and the injector is pushed far enough out i could see lots of oil and diesel being mixed and possibly shoved into the cylinder. My guess is that the whole cylinder bank would be dead at that point, though, due to lack of oil pressure... Worth checking out though...
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Old 10-24-2016, 06:29 PM   #52
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when you say injector hitting the valve cover, like a clean space i the cover where fuel was spraying on it ? Or a mark like a rocker arm broke and was tapping the valve cover?

You can start the engine with the valve cover off at idle for a short time and see if oil or fuel is soraying out when it shouldn't..

If you take an injector out be really careful about oil filling the cylinder .. there is a procedure to get it out otherwise you can bust a piston.. usually people hand rotate the engine over a couple times to clear the cylinder if oil.
I know somewhere I read about how to drain that oil rail before yanking an injector , I need to find that .
Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 07:34 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
when you say injector hitting the valve cover, like a clean space i the cover where fuel was spraying on it ? Or a mark like a rocker arm broke and was tapping the valve cover?

You can start the engine with the valve cover off at idle for a short time and see if oil or fuel is soraying out when it shouldn't..

If you take an injector out be really careful about oil filling the cylinder .. there is a procedure to get it out otherwise you can bust a piston.. usually people hand rotate the engine over a couple times to clear the cylinder if oil.
I know somewhere I read about how to drain that oil rail before yanking an injector , I need to find that .
Christopher
There is a square-ish mark on the valve cover in the shape of the top of the injector. As if the injector was physically touching the valve cover. I can take a pic in the morning Incase I am jumping to conclusions, but I'm pretty sure that's what caused the mark.

If I started the engine without the valve cover, what would I expect to see? Or I should say, what should I be looking for that would help with the diagnosis?

I picked up an o-rings kit at advanced auto this evening. Was pretty reasonably priced at $16 per box (2 injectors per box)
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Old 10-24-2016, 07:48 PM   #54
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wierd.. is it perhaps as simple as an injector that simply broke or partially bscked out because the retainer screw on the top corner failed??
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Old 10-24-2016, 07:57 PM   #55
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Here are instructions for r&r of Ford Powerstroke injectors. Should be the same for yours.

How To: 7.3L Powerstroke Injector Removal and Installation


The following article outlines the general procedure for removing and replacing the fuel injectors in the 7.3L Powerstroke engine. All information is based on procedure advice and knowledge passed on by Ryan Bean of Bean’s Diesel Performance.


Tools needed:
– Inch-Pound Torque Wrench
– Small Pry-Bar
– Rubber Mallet
– Blue Shop Towels
– 13mm, 11mm, 10mm (deep), and 8mm sockets
– 24mm socket on a breaker bar
– Phillips Screw Driver
-Shop vac rigged with very small hose


* This process does not require the draining of any oil.


Remove plastic engine cover, air filter assembly, turbo intake hose, CCV assembly, Intercooler Tubes, and unplug main wiring harness (10mm bolt)
Start with the driver’s side. It is much easier to do because there is a lot more space So, begin by removing the driver’s side valve cover (13mm bolts).
Valve Cover Gasket Removal: Unplug the injectors by flipping down the metal clips and gently pull the plugs. Then unplug the Glow Plugs by gently pulling up on the wire plug. With everything unplugged, carefully remove the gasket being careful not to catch any wires on the injectors. This gasket will be reused unless you want to replace it. There is usually no need to replace to replace it.
Oil Spout Removal: You will be prying the injectors out so you will want to remove the oil spouts now. Using a 5mm allen wrench, remove the oil spout from each injector. You will reuse these with your new injectors, so don’t lose them.
Using an 8mm socket remove the lower injector retaining bolt from each injector. The upper bolt should not be removed, as the injector collar will simply slide off the upper bolt.
Start at the Back: Start with the rear most injector and work forward. This is important as the angle of the engine will allow for the majority of fuel and oil to drain into the rear cylinder. Using a small prybar apply pressure between the injector collar and the top of the head. It will take a push to get the injector moving. When the rear injector comes free, carefully remove it. At this point you should hear oil and fuel gurgling as it pours into the cylinder. Do your best to soak up the mess with blue shop towels (twist a couple blue shop towels together for this). With the shop towels in the injector hole, you can turn the engine over a few times by hand with a 24mm socket on the front crank bolt. I would suggest rigging up a shop vac with a very small hole to suck the oil and fuel out of the cylinder.
Remove the other Three. With the rear injector removed, you can now remove the three forward ones the same way. Also, since they’re all out, now is a good time to make sure all of the injector holes are clear of debris and that the copper washer came out with the injector. you will also want to visually check the brass injector cups and make sure they are still brass colored. Try to wipe the oil off of them the best you can. If the cups are soot covered they will need to be replaced. This has to be done with a thread tap.
Remove the Glow Plugs: With the injectors still out, remove all four glow plugs with a 10mm deep socket. Unless you have recently changed them now is a good time to. If you do so, be sure to only use Motorcraft ZD-11 glow plugs made by Beru. Using a 10mm deep socket, torque each glow plug to 168 in/lb. Plug them in.
Install Your New Injectors: Liberally coat the new injector (especially around the o-rings) with clean engine oil and carefully place it in the hole. BE CAREFUL NOT TO TERA THE O-RINGS. Once in the hole, give the top of the injector a few sharp blows with your hand to seat it. Then, get it the rest of the way into the hole with a rubber mallet. Don’t hit it crazy hard! Just give it a few hits until the collar slides over the upper retaining bolt. Repeat this process with the other three injectors.
Bolt Them Down: Insert the lower retaining bolt back into it’s hole and torque to 120 in/lb with an 8mm socket. Then replace the oil spouts, and tighten the 5mm allen bolt until snug.
Replace the VC Cover: Replace the valve cover gasket, and plug the injectors back in being sure to secure the metal clip. The glow plugs are still out so you can’t plug those in, and be sure to leave the valve cover harness unplugged. Replace the valve cover, holding it on with only a couple bolts.
Repeat Steps on the Passenger Side.
Replace Valve Covers: Reinstall the valve covers. Use a 13mm socket to torque each bolt to 96 in/lb. You will only need to put a few bolts in now. you will see why in a later step.
Plug the main engine wire harness back in and reinstall all of the plumbing, etc. that you removed in the first step.
Get Ready to Start: With the valve cover harnesses still unplugged, crank the engine via the key for 20-30 seconds to help build back oil pressure. If you would prefer to crank on the engine for only a few seconds, open the top of the HPOP reservoir and fill it with engine oil. It is also not a bad idea to cycle the key a few times to rebuild fuel pressure. Let the starter rest for 5 minutes after the long crank;
Start It Up: Plug the valve cover harnesses back in. Now you’re ready to go for it. Give it about a 15 second crank. It may start, and it may not. If not, let the starter rest a couple minutes and then try again. You can here the injectors start clicking right before the engine fires.
Work the Air Out: After getting your truck started,you should let it idle for a few minutes to make sure that everything is working normally. The truck may produce some white smoke at first and idle a bit rough. There is air in the system that needs to be worked out. The best way to do this is to drive the truck. The harder you drive it, the quicker the air issue will go away. You may also see some oil dripping out of you exhaust, and because this happens you should pay attention to where your exhaust is pointed because it will throw some oil. Remember that oil was blown through the exhaust valve in the cylinder when you started it. It shouldn’t be a lot if you got most of it with the shop vac.
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Old 10-24-2016, 08:18 PM   #56
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im guessing a step in there is missing which is after you crank it enough with no compression (glow plugs out) to clear the oil out of the cylinders and get oil pumped back up to the HPOP that you would then pull the valve covers off, reinstall the glow plugs, (or put new ones in), connect the wires and then permanently install the valve covers.. then go to the start-it-up step?

-Christopher
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Old 10-24-2016, 08:26 PM   #57
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Good catch Christopher.
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Old 10-24-2016, 08:30 PM   #58
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Wow this is an informative, intriguing , and exciting thread.


I am.excited to see you uncover the culprit, and from where i am sitting that motor sounds good, so i dont think the problem has done any serious damage... Especially if it ran well.

Good luck!

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Old 10-24-2016, 09:21 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Carytowncat View Post
Wow this is an informative, intriguing , and exciting thread.


I am.excited to see you uncover the culprit, and from where i am sitting that motor sounds good, so i dont think the problem has done any serious damage... Especially if it ran well.

Good luck!

I wish it was exciting nearer my home town

If I cant get a quick fix I wont be able to keep it. I need to get back home for work.
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Old 10-24-2016, 09:22 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
Here are instructions for r&r of Ford Powerstroke injectors. Should be the same for yours.

How To: 7.3L Powerstroke Injector Removal and Installation


The following article outlines the general procedure for removing and replacing the fuel injectors in the 7.3L Powerstroke engine. All information is based on procedure advice and knowledge passed on by Ryan Bean of Bean’s Diesel Performance.


Tools needed:
– Inch-Pound Torque Wrench
– Small Pry-Bar
– Rubber Mallet
– Blue Shop Towels
– 13mm, 11mm, 10mm (deep), and 8mm sockets
– 24mm socket on a breaker bar
– Phillips Screw Driver
-Shop vac rigged with very small hose


* This process does not require the draining of any oil.


Remove plastic engine cover, air filter assembly, turbo intake hose, CCV assembly, Intercooler Tubes, and unplug main wiring harness (10mm bolt)
Start with the driver’s side. It is much easier to do because there is a lot more space So, begin by removing the driver’s side valve cover (13mm bolts).
Valve Cover Gasket Removal: Unplug the injectors by flipping down the metal clips and gently pull the plugs. Then unplug the Glow Plugs by gently pulling up on the wire plug. With everything unplugged, carefully remove the gasket being careful not to catch any wires on the injectors. This gasket will be reused unless you want to replace it. There is usually no need to replace to replace it.
Oil Spout Removal: You will be prying the injectors out so you will want to remove the oil spouts now. Using a 5mm allen wrench, remove the oil spout from each injector. You will reuse these with your new injectors, so don’t lose them.
Using an 8mm socket remove the lower injector retaining bolt from each injector. The upper bolt should not be removed, as the injector collar will simply slide off the upper bolt.
Start at the Back: Start with the rear most injector and work forward. This is important as the angle of the engine will allow for the majority of fuel and oil to drain into the rear cylinder. Using a small prybar apply pressure between the injector collar and the top of the head. It will take a push to get the injector moving. When the rear injector comes free, carefully remove it. At this point you should hear oil and fuel gurgling as it pours into the cylinder. Do your best to soak up the mess with blue shop towels (twist a couple blue shop towels together for this). With the shop towels in the injector hole, you can turn the engine over a few times by hand with a 24mm socket on the front crank bolt. I would suggest rigging up a shop vac with a very small hole to suck the oil and fuel out of the cylinder.
Remove the other Three. With the rear injector removed, you can now remove the three forward ones the same way. Also, since they’re all out, now is a good time to make sure all of the injector holes are clear of debris and that the copper washer came out with the injector. you will also want to visually check the brass injector cups and make sure they are still brass colored. Try to wipe the oil off of them the best you can. If the cups are soot covered they will need to be replaced. This has to be done with a thread tap.
Remove the Glow Plugs: With the injectors still out, remove all four glow plugs with a 10mm deep socket. Unless you have recently changed them now is a good time to. If you do so, be sure to only use Motorcraft ZD-11 glow plugs made by Beru. Using a 10mm deep socket, torque each glow plug to 168 in/lb. Plug them in.
Install Your New Injectors: Liberally coat the new injector (especially around the o-rings) with clean engine oil and carefully place it in the hole. BE CAREFUL NOT TO TERA THE O-RINGS. Once in the hole, give the top of the injector a few sharp blows with your hand to seat it. Then, get it the rest of the way into the hole with a rubber mallet. Don’t hit it crazy hard! Just give it a few hits until the collar slides over the upper retaining bolt. Repeat this process with the other three injectors.
Bolt Them Down: Insert the lower retaining bolt back into it’s hole and torque to 120 in/lb with an 8mm socket. Then replace the oil spouts, and tighten the 5mm allen bolt until snug.
Replace the VC Cover: Replace the valve cover gasket, and plug the injectors back in being sure to secure the metal clip. The glow plugs are still out so you can’t plug those in, and be sure to leave the valve cover harness unplugged. Replace the valve cover, holding it on with only a couple bolts.
Repeat Steps on the Passenger Side.
Replace Valve Covers: Reinstall the valve covers. Use a 13mm socket to torque each bolt to 96 in/lb. You will only need to put a few bolts in now. you will see why in a later step.
Plug the main engine wire harness back in and reinstall all of the plumbing, etc. that you removed in the first step.
Get Ready to Start: With the valve cover harnesses still unplugged, crank the engine via the key for 20-30 seconds to help build back oil pressure. If you would prefer to crank on the engine for only a few seconds, open the top of the HPOP reservoir and fill it with engine oil. It is also not a bad idea to cycle the key a few times to rebuild fuel pressure. Let the starter rest for 5 minutes after the long crank;
Start It Up: Plug the valve cover harnesses back in. Now you’re ready to go for it. Give it about a 15 second crank. It may start, and it may not. If not, let the starter rest a couple minutes and then try again. You can here the injectors start clicking right before the engine fires.
Work the Air Out: After getting your truck started,you should let it idle for a few minutes to make sure that everything is working normally. The truck may produce some white smoke at first and idle a bit rough. There is air in the system that needs to be worked out. The best way to do this is to drive the truck. The harder you drive it, the quicker the air issue will go away. You may also see some oil dripping out of you exhaust, and because this happens you should pay attention to where your exhaust is pointed because it will throw some oil. Remember that oil was blown through the exhaust valve in the cylinder when you started it. It shouldn’t be a lot if you got most of it with the shop vac.
Nice write up of the procedure! Fingers crossed this helps get this baby on the road tomorrow!!
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