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Old 03-04-2015, 02:56 PM   #51
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I have a new question. I've spotted a bus in Tulsa that's a 98 Bluebird - front engine flat nose 90 passenger. Now I heard that in 96 they started having computer monitoring. I'm not sure if that's something more or different than the ones in cars, or if it's good or bad. Opinions?
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Old 03-04-2015, 03:14 PM   #52
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I prefer not to have electronic controls for the engine. Electronic injection is more expensive to fix and can be harder to fix as well.
But if its in good running shape, it will likely live a very long time and from what you've said you aren't planning on driving it much. If its in your price range, I'd say take a look and see about test driving it.
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Old 03-04-2015, 05:08 PM   #53
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The on-board diagnostics in heavy trucks (buses) is different from the OBD-II standard for passenger cars. That '98 bus will use J1708/J1587 for its OBD protocol. The truck industry has generally moved to J1939 now, and I think most cite 2004 as the transition time, but as with passenger cars the transition varied among makes and models. The protocol doesn't matter much, really -- it seems pretty universal that scan tools support both flavors.

For me at least, computer controlled isn't a downside. Basic maintenance (change fluids and filters) and minor repair (leaks) are going to be comparable either way. Major repairs like an injection pump could be more costly, but those seem to be rare failures, too.

Do you know what engine and transmission, and maybe axle ratio, are in that bus?
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:52 PM   #54
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So am I correct to assume that on-board diagnostics consists of more than a stupid check engine light?

Also, second question on this, do the electronic components involved in this system tolerate long periods of sitting?
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:56 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Do you know what engine and transmission, and maybe axle ratio, are in that bus?
Nope. If I decide I am very interested I will have to get more details on it before I drive down there.
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Old 03-04-2015, 11:34 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misi View Post
So am I correct to assume that on-board diagnostics consists of more than a stupid check engine light?

Also, second question on this, do the electronic components involved in this system tolerate long periods of sitting?
I have a scan gauge on my bus, works great it will give you engine codes, will let you clear a check engine light, also gives real time engine info like mpg, oil pressure, temps and more.
as for sitting for long periods of time well I'm not sure but I think the environment would play a big part of it.
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Old 03-05-2015, 12:51 AM   #57
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Quote:
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So am I correct to assume that on-board diagnostics consists of more than a stupid check engine light?

Also, second question on this, do the electronic components involved in this system tolerate long periods of sitting?
If you or your favorite mechanic have a scan tool, then yes. For example mine has had its ABS brake lamp lit for a long time. Last week I finally got it hooked up to the Bendix software and got the trouble codes out: no signal from the front wheel sensors, and open circuit on one rear sensor. With that knowledge I was able to clean and re-install the front two in 15 minutes and clear the codes. Fortunately the new sensor for the rear is not expensive; unfortunately replacement will require removing both wheels and the brake drum. Ugh! I'm not ready to deal with lug nuts torqued to 500 ft-lb, so I'll live with the ABS light for quite a while longer.

I can't think of any reason why they shouldn't tolerate long periods of sitting. You'll have to something about the battery discharging of course, and it's a good idea to run any engine periodically (the whole powertrain really) to splash a new coat of oil on all the moving parts.
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Old 03-05-2015, 12:52 AM   #58
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I have a scan gauge on my bus, works great it will give you engine codes, will let you clear a check engine light, also gives real time engine info like mpg, oil pressure, temps and more.
If you don't mind my asking, what gauge is it? I'm kind of looking for something like that for mine.
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