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Old 02-13-2019, 05:52 AM   #1
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Hello from NY

In my first intro I was a bit vague. I've just started to research and I at the very, very beginning. I'm the type that like to read up and gather as much info I can before diving head first into such a large project, and a complete 180 in lifestyle.

So far I've already learned a lot, from how to buy a bus, get it registered, and even temp tags to travel from place of sale to work area.

I am still looking into buying but that could be a couple months to a year out. But we've decided on at least a 5 window shortie, or if we can find one a 3/4 bus. Depends on want we find for the price.

The community is very pleasant and so far I've seen nothing but helpful, knowledgeable people eager to see others succeed in their own projects. For me this is important as I like getting 2nd opinions on things, even if my gut, and head know it right, I like that for sure info.

As I start this and begin to look forward to getting on the road, a few concerns plague me day by day. As we live Paycheck to paycheck how will we be able to make money on the road for fuel, food, and other random expenses? When on the road where can you safely "camp". I understand this varies state to state.

As we live paycheck to paycheck, this will be a very budgeted, kinda slower process, but we can not wait to get started!
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:06 AM   #2
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Welcome! We started this journey with research Research RESEARCH. There are certain drivetrains that are desirable, some engines to avoid at all costs. I recently saw a video of a couple that finished a conversion, then 3 months into their journey decided to call it quits because they couldn't get above 30mph when going uphill.
Free camping is plentiful out west on public lands, but may be more limited to stealth camping or WalMart parking lots in the east and midwest. Work might be limited to seasonal labor gigs, workamping (Google it) or remote tech work. All depends on what skills and abilities you've got to offer.
There are tons of people who live as full time nomads (we hope to join the ranks pretty soon), so it's definitely doable!
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:20 AM   #3
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Welcome to the forum.
Living on a really tight budget can be super hard. If the bus is your house and your house breaks down it can be VERY expensive. Fuel is cheap. Price a set of bus tires and be ready for some sticker shock. Not trying to discourage you but a used school bus can cost many times the purchase price in repairs and upkeep. I had a bus towed to a service center and sold the bus once I saw the ten thousand dollar repair bill.
Owning land is a big help when owning a bus. Otherwise it usually costs money to store and many places don't want you living in it while its stored.
Most of the folks making money while traveling own businesses they operate remotely.
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Old 02-13-2019, 09:46 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew Bru View Post
Welcome! We started this journey with research Research RESEARCH. There are certain drivetrains that are desirable, some engines to avoid at all costs. I recently saw a video of a couple that finished a conversion, then 3 months into their journey decided to call it quits because they couldn't get above 30mph when going uphill.
Free camping is plentiful out west on public lands, but may be more limited to stealth camping or WalMart parking lots in the east and midwest. Work might be limited to seasonal labor gigs, workamping (Google it) or remote tech work. All depends on what skills and abilities you've got to offer.
There are tons of people who live as full time nomads (we hope to join the ranks pretty soon), so it's definitely doable!

I've seen a couple threads on engines and that. I'll probably just take a picture of the engine and list the Drivetrain, and have you guys give me the pros and cons on which is best. I'm handy on gasoline engines, but diesel is a different ball game...

I think Workamping is going to be how we start off till we get a better feel and talk with others to see what types of other money makers there are.

I like that price "free" lol we have a few places here in NY that are free like the state Forests and such, just don't know what beyond NY...
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Old 02-13-2019, 10:21 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Welcome to the forum.
Living on a really tight budget can be super hard. If the bus is your house and your house breaks down it can be VERY expensive. Fuel is cheap. Price a set of bus tires and be ready for some sticker shock. Not trying to discourage you but a used school bus can cost many times the purchase price in repairs and upkeep. I had a bus towed to a service center and sold the bus once I saw the ten thousand dollar repair bill.
Owning land is a big help when owning a bus. Otherwise it usually costs money to store and many places don't want you living in it while its stored.
Most of the folks making money while traveling own businesses they operate remotely.
We plan on saving up, buying a bus, doing what we can with what we saved up, while building still putting money aside for an "emergency fund"

Tires are expensive in general, truck tires even more, this I realize and why we want to have a savings before making this our home.

Also i feel like this way of life is limited to those who can work remotely, or have thire own business. It shouldn't be this way... imo. I understand that it can be done doing Workamping, and temp gigs, I just want to make sure we're not getting in over our heads money wise, after all is said and done.
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Old 02-14-2019, 06:11 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearded_Steed View Post
We plan on saving up, buying a bus, doing what we can with what we saved up, while building still putting money aside for an "emergency fund"

Tires are expensive in general, truck tires even more, this I realize and why we want to have a savings before making this our home.

Also i feel like this way of life is limited to those who can work remotely, or have their own business. It shouldn't be this way... imo. I understand that it can be done doing Workamping, and temp gigs, I just want to make sure we're not getting in over our heads money wise, after all is said and done.
BS, welcome to the forum. IMO, one of the cool things about building a skoolie is that it can be whatever the builder wants (or needs) it to be, from very basic to very fancy.

Living for free in a rudimentary built skoolie "could" be better or more satisfying than paying a bunch of money for rent/mortgage, utilities, etc. I have seen some pretty happy people living in some pretty low cost skoolies.



As for living payday to payday, I highly recommend reading: Total Money Makeover; it changed my life... No tricky dance moves, just a solid plan for getting one's financial house in order.
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