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Old 01-06-2016, 11:54 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by SweetBearCub View Post
Not according to the California DMV.

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Hey SweetBearCub, the DVM code you posted says that no CDL is required for any Housecar 40' or less, does it mean that the 26,000 weight does not apply, does it mean that as long as is 40' or less regardless of the weight?

J
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Old 01-06-2016, 01:41 PM   #32
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charles_m's assertion is true (so far as I'm aware) in Utah as well: the registered weight is used in calculating registration fee/taxes, but the GVWR on the vehicle data plate is the number that matters when license class is called into question.

Also.. at least in Utah.. it seems a person can own and register/license a vehicle they're not licensed to drive. Driver licensing applies to operation of a vehicle, not to ownership. As SweetBearCub has found, it's hard to bootstrap when a person wants to become licensed to drive but doesn't own a vehicle in the desired class. I certainly wouldn't throw any stones at a person who bought a vehicle they weren't yet licensed to drive and then used it to go do their road test... Just sayin'!

Don't forget that big trucks are not the only class A vehicles. A carefully-chosen late model pickup truck towing a trailer can easily be class A and might be more readily borrowed for the purpose of a driving test. There's some disagreement among the DMV, DOT, and driver license division people I spoke with in Utah.. but by my interpretation of our rules: for example, a 2012 Ford F-350 2-wheel drive dual rear wheel truck has GVWR 13300, and if one tows a Big Tex 14000 pound dump trailer, then the combination is 27300. It's into CDL territory because the combination is 26k or greater, and it's class A because of the trailer: class B CDL only allows trailers below 10k. Of course the personal/non-commercial use exemptions which have already been fiercely debated also apply so individuals towing their horse trailer, toy hauler RV, or whatever don't actually require CDL licensing. Contractors moving a trailer full of concrete forms however do require CDL class A and do routinely get ticketed if they're found with less.
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Old 01-06-2016, 02:48 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by juliol View Post
Hey SweetBearCub, the DVM code you posted says that no CDL is required for any Housecar 40' or less, does it mean that the 26,000 weight does not apply, does it mean that as long as is 40' or less regardless of the weight?

J
Good question. I have no idea, but I do know that the bus would initially be titled as a bus and not a motorhome until the conversion was far enough along for California to re-classify it.
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Old 01-06-2016, 02:58 PM   #34
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As SweetBearCub has found, it's hard to bootstrap when a person wants to become licensed to drive but doesn't own a vehicle in the desired class. I certainly wouldn't throw any stones at a person who bought a vehicle they weren't yet licensed to drive and then used it to go do their road test... Just sayin'!

Don't forget that big trucks are not the only class A vehicles. A carefully-chosen late model pickup truck towing a trailer can easily be class A and might be more readily borrowed for the purpose of a driving test. There's some disagreement among the DMV, DOT, and driver license division people I spoke with in Utah.. but by my interpretation of our rules: for example, a 2012 Ford F-350 2-wheel drive dual rear wheel truck has GVWR 13300, and if one tows a Big Tex 14000 pound dump trailer, then the combination is 27300. It's into CDL territory because the combination is 26k or greater, and it's class A because of the trailer: class B CDL only allows trailers below 10k. Of course the personal/non-commercial use exemptions which have already been fiercely debated also apply so individuals towing their horse trailer, toy hauler RV, or whatever don't actually require CDL licensing. Contractors moving a trailer full of concrete forms however do require CDL class A and do routinely get ticketed if they're found with less.
Some interesting points!

I do admire your finely honed sense of loophole finding, lol.
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Old 01-06-2016, 03:28 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by SweetBearCub View Post
Some interesting points!

I do admire your finely honed sense of loophole finding, lol.
Part of it comes from personal experience... several years ago I had a class B CDL (straight truck any weight, plus trailer less than 10k), a pickup truck with 8800 GVW, and a dump trailer with 12000 GVW. I did occasional work for hire with that truck and trailer. Everybody I asked had a different opinion about the situation. Some said the combination weight of 20,800 being under 26k meant it's not a CDL-level vehicle and the class B 10k trailer limit would not apply. Others said my 12k trailer exceeded the 10k license limit regardless of the combined weight and so was out of my license class. Knowing it's hopeless to debate the finer points of statute with a police officer on the side of the road, and my license was coming due for renewal anyway, I resolved to find some scheme for upgrading my class B to class A and eliminate all doubt. Since I already held a CDL license I had only to find a class A vehicle combination and go do a road test. I don't recall who it was that pointed out to me how the right light truck and trailer together can become a class A vehicle. Finally through a relative I was able to borrow a gooseneck horse trailer and a tow rig... a custom Peterbilt tractor with 6 captains chairs and a 6-speed automatic transmission! I drove it for half an hour one afternoon to get a feel for it, then took it the next day to the driver license office for a brief road test.

That was MUCH easier than getting myself into a regular OTR tractor with full 48 or 53 foot trailer for a road test!
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