Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-12-2019, 05:26 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 2
New, looking to build my skoolie soon...

Good evening!

I'm a school bus driver from Richmond, VA and I've been long interested in buying a used school bus to do a RV conversion. I am seeking to transition to full-time RV life and do cross-country travel in the future.

I would like to receive guidance towards buying a bus, like if it's better to buy a conventional, FE transit, or "pusher". And what powertrain configurations should I seek in a build, and what would be the best length for my intended use (I'm single, no kids, and all I have can fit in 2 tupperwares).

I look forward to learning from y'all as I begin and continue my transition into the skoolie life. Thank y'all in advance.
Metrolinerxlz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 05:53 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 497
Welcome to the wide world of skoolies!

Before we suggest a particular drivetrain or configuration, I think its important to know a bit more about how you'd like to travel. It sounds like you're pretty flexible - you need room for one person, and you don't have a lot of stuff. That means that you could fit into just about any type of bus - a cutaway van, a shortie on a full-size chassis, or a full-size 40' bus.

For example, are you planning on towing a car behind your bus? Having a car (or jeep - check out some of the places Dory the bus has gone) means you can park the bus, and explore a bit more in something that fits in a parking space. You have to plan ahead to go food shopping in a 40' bus. A bus on a cutaway van chassis won't tow a car as well - but the whole bus will fit in the supermarket parking lot.

A lot of people split the difference with a bike or scooter. (You can carry it on a hitch behind the bus, or some people design the rear part of their bus to be more of an unfinished garage/storage area.)

Also, how much room do you want to have - a bus is basically a rectangle, 8 feet wide. The largest buses will give you 35-38 feet of living space (easily giving you a dedicated bedroom, bathroom, and living room/kitchen), while a cutaway van is about 12 feet long - so you end up with everything in 1 "room."


It's a lot of think about - and there's tons of discussions about all that stuff here, so you've come to the right place.
Mark_In_MA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 06:30 PM   #3
Bus Nut
 
Mountain Gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 382
Year: 1999
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC1000 HandyBus
Engine: 5.9L 24V-L6 Cummins ISB
Rated Cap: 26 foot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metrolinerxlz View Post
Good evening!

I'm a school bus driver from Richmond, VA and I've been long interested in buying a used school bus to do a RV conversion. I am seeking to transition to full-time RV life and do cross-country travel in the future.

I would like to receive guidance towards buying a bus, like if it's better to buy a conventional, FE transit, or "pusher". And what powertrain configurations should I seek in a build, and what would be the best length for my intended use (I'm single, no kids, and all I have can fit in 2 tupperwares).

I look forward to learning from y'all as I begin and continue my transition into the skoolie life. Thank y'all in advance.
HA HA that's funny. A school bus driver gave ME the advice to get a flatnose - they are easiest to drive she said - more so than the cutouts. In the end, I got what I got which is what was available, and I love it.
Mountain Gnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 07:11 PM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 2

Mark_In_MA,
Once I finish my conversion, I'll (likely) give up my car as I'd have no use for it at that point.

I am looking for a 29'-35' bus which would cover my bases and provide some versatility in boondocking situations.

Mountain Gnome
, you are absolutely correct in that transit-style (flat nose) buses are MUCH easier to drive. You see everything in front of you. And they typically last longer than a conventional. But what I meant and should've specified is which of the two are better in terms of maintenance.

Some mechanics will not touch a transit-style bus because of accessibility to key components. Some won't mess with certain engine makes/models. So I need something I can learn on and maintain by myself or that any mechanic won't mind working on.
Metrolinerxlz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 07:15 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Mountain Gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 382
Year: 1999
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC1000 HandyBus
Engine: 5.9L 24V-L6 Cummins ISB
Rated Cap: 26 foot
since you ask...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metrolinerxlz View Post
Mountain Gnome, you are absolutely correct in that transit-style (flat nose) buses are MUCH easier to drive. You see everything in front of you. And they typically last longer than a conventional. But what I meant and should've specified is which of the two are better in terms of maintenance.

Some mechanics will not touch a transit-style bus because of accessibility to key components. Some won't mess with certain engine makes/models. So I need something I can learn on and maintain by myself or that any mechanic won't mind working on.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f33/fe...air-26820.html
Mountain Gnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.