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Old 11-11-2019, 04:36 PM   #21
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Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
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Originally Posted by Mirakel View Post
I appreciate your response. What are the negatives of a roof raise? I may have totally overlooked that bit of information. I tend to stay away from negative thoughts, words, energy and people. The glass is always half full and everything always works out for me. That's my motto.
More profile up front means worse fuel economy
Bigger box to heat and cool
Tall roof easier to damage from passing trees,etc.
Wind resistance creates more wear and tear on the drivetrain.
More awkward to drive.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:30 PM   #22
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 11
Year: 1994
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Conventional
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 28 passenger
Smile Hand brake

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Originally Posted by marathonhotel View Post
Good day Mirakel,
Your gave the idea to convert mine.
I bough a small business and a 3800 / 1992 came with it. Low Miles and a strong V8 diesel. I didn't figure out where the hand break is located ! Do you have a user manual with your's or can you point me to a link ?
Thank
Hi Marathon,

I'm glad my dreamy bus build inspired your creativity. My bus brakes has a big yellow square knob, labeled brake on the right side of the steering wheel bus panel. It is located just slightly above the ignition.

Is your bus an air brake system?
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:42 PM   #23
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
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Year: 1994
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Chassis: Conventional
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 28 passenger
Roof raise

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Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
More profile up front means worse fuel economy
Bigger box to heat and cool
Tall roof easier to damage from passing trees,etc.
Wind resistance creates more wear and tear on the drivetrain.
More awkward to drive.
Yeah after retaking the bus measurements, and having honey stand in the bus to give us a better visual, I decided to raise it over the bedroom and over the shower (which was the original plan, I got a little carried away watching roof raise vids on YouTube [being initially concerned honey would not fit in the bus]) honey's height is right to the top of the bus ceiling).

Also I really like the original windows and I want to keep those.

My bus living space inside is 7.5 ft W x 6.4 ft H x 22 ft L....I have 3 doors, the main entrance, the wheelchair lift door, and the emergency door in the back. I really like the emergency door in the back.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:57 AM   #24
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Join Date: May 2016
Location: Georgia
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Year: 2001
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: IH
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirakel View Post
Hi Marathon,

I'm glad my dreamy bus build inspired your creativity. My bus brakes has a big yellow square knob, labeled brake on the right side of the steering wheel bus panel. It is located just slightly above the ignition.

Is your bus an air brake system?

Yours sounds like an air brake system.


One thing that caught my attention in your profile and in the various posts - there is no such thing as a "3800 diesel" in IH school buses. 3800 is the model designation IH gave for the school bus chassis. You will most likely have either the T444 engine (7.3L) or DT466 (7.6L) with the latter being preferable. Both were available with air or hydraulic brakes.


I read "deck" and roof raise ... raising more than a foot or so may be excessive unless you have a specific reason for it and are prepared for the inevitable hazards that come with it - increased fuel usage, wear-and-tear, changes in handling, and of course insurance difficulties. Also, if that deck is planned for the roof - many insurance policies forbid roof decks. I'm not saying not to do it, just be prepared for the consequences and pitfalls that will follow.


One thing I didn't see discussed was the inevitable "I was removing unneeded wiring and now my bus won't start" which happens with about every 4th or 5th noob unaware of how the door interlocks work. Better to follow discussions on this *Before* you touch the first wire. Basically, doors and windows *MUST* be closed and latched, but *NOT* locked, the idea being to keep the kids in the bus while in motion, but unlocked in case of a wreck and rescuers need to evacuate the bus.
*Edit* The interlock system can be bypassed and removed, just need to do it intelligently.

This forum is a great source of info and inspiration, so use it wisely and best of luck to you.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:44 AM   #25
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Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirakel View Post
My bus living space inside is 7.5 ft W x 6.4 ft H x 22 ft L....
WITH YOUR HONEY BEING 6'11"" ... I would imagine he has to stoop ALL of the time when inside the bus. A roof raise in this case is a good thing. Like others have suggested (should you go through with the roof raise), raise it in increments with your honey trying it on for size. Do so until it looks like you want and gives your honey the headroom needed. Remember to factor in and loss of headroom for insulation on the floor and ceiling, assuming you will be insulating.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:00 AM   #26
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
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Year: 1994
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Conventional
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 28 passenger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
WITH YOUR HONEY BEING 6'11"" ... I would imagine he has to stoop ALL of the time when inside the bus. A roof raise in this case is a good thing. Like others have suggested (should you go through with the roof raise), raise it in increments with your honey trying it on for size. Do so until it looks like you want and gives your honey the headroom needed. Remember to factor in and loss of headroom for insulation on the floor and ceiling, assuming you will be insulating.
...Yes he is stooping, stooping, stooping... Of primary importance is being insured upon completion of the build. So before we start throwing money and lofty ideas into our build, we are consulting professionals.
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Old 11-15-2019, 08:37 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Mirakel View Post
Thanks for a great go-to forum!!!... I'm totally open for conversation, ideas, suggestions, how-to's, etc...about bus life and conversions...
Welcome to the forum. As you are no doubt quickly finding out, you will receive no shortage of "helpful insight" here on the forum.

Good luck with your build.
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Old 11-17-2019, 12:58 PM   #28
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I understand the concern over structural modifications and insurance. It has been brought up a number of times but I don't recall ever seeing a first hand account of trouble.

Has anyone here actually been denied insurance because of a roof raise?

Two of my buses have had the roof raised and have had no trouble. My insurance agent did make it very clear that roof decks and wood stoves are deal killers.
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:19 AM   #29
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Virginia
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Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
I understand the concern over structural modifications and insurance. It has been brought up a number of times but I don't recall ever seeing a first hand account of trouble.

Has anyone here actually been denied insurance because of a roof raise?

Two of my buses have had the roof raised and have had no trouble. My insurance agent did make it very clear that roof decks and wood stoves are deal killers.
It's another of those things that varies by carrier & state. I know that if I tried to submit a bus in VA that had a raised roof it would be declined due to structural modifications. I've just been warning anyone that I've talked to about that fact and suggesting not to do it. Same for decks and storage on the roof.
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:57 AM   #30
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Join Date: May 2016
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Originally Posted by sutphinins View Post
It's another of those things that varies by carrier & state. I know that if I tried to submit a bus in VA that had a raised roof it would be declined due to structural modifications. I've just been warning anyone that I've talked to about that fact and suggesting not to do it. Same for decks and storage on the roof.
I have run into the deck and wood stove issues first hand. I have heard third hand warnings about roof raise issues but no examples of someone actually having a problem.

That was my question. Has anyone actually had a problem with a roof raise?
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