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Old 01-23-2017, 05:21 PM   #1
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Skoolie Noobie

Hello to all. After months of watching youtube videos I decided to make my own skoolie. I will be doing all the work myself except the spray foam insulation. I would greatly appreciate any and all advice I can get from anyone. I am new to this and look forward to this next chapter in my life.
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Old 01-23-2017, 07:41 PM   #2
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How exciting! Please if you can video tape the spray foam process, would love to have reference for others (me too!) on that step
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Old 01-23-2017, 08:32 PM   #3
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Hi I am doing lots of research my self hope this help ...

Spray foam insulation can help save up to 50% in energy costs, protect a building from moisture intrusion, and provide sound insulation. In addition, it provides two to three times more insulation that traditional fiberglass.

However, according to Environmental Working Group, most common spray polyurethane foam insulation contains methylene diphenyl diisocyanate, or MDI, a synthetic chemical linked to asthma, lung damage and even death.

“Because of the chemical’s risks, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has set the maximum legal limit for MDI exposure among workers who handle it and related chemicals at 0.02 parts per million in workplace air,” reports EWG.

This is fine for professional installers, as they have the equipment necessary to protect them from MDI. But homeowners and DIY-ers may not even be aware of the danger.

spray foam insulationIn 2011, the EPA considered restricting or banning MDI’s use, but no action has been taken to date. Until that happens, here are some alternatives that are better for the environment and the people installing them:

1. Soybean-based spray foam – Not made with any added chemicals, including MDI, this product has the same insulation properties as spray foam. A portion of the petroleum base that makes up the product is replaced by soy. There is still petroleum in the product, though.

2. Castor oil spray foam – Castor oil is used in place of some of the petroleum, and the foam is applied with a water base, as opposed to the chemicals in other products.

3. Cotton denim and sheep’s wool batts – These two types of products cannot be sprayed in, but are tucked into the spaces between the studs. Neither is as efficient as foam, but they do not contain the added chemicals that are found in traditional fiberglass batts or in foam products.

Although all spray foam insulation is green in the fact that it saves energy, and all such products contain some petroleum by-products, not all products are created equal. This is another of those times when it pays to do your homework.

Source and Photo: Fairfield Citizen, dunktanktechnician through a Creative Commons License
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Old 01-23-2017, 10:17 PM   #4
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Thank you for your reply. When I start the spray foam process I will definitely post video of the process.
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Old 01-24-2017, 06:10 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by pepe View Post
Hi I am doing lots of research my self hope this help ...

Spray foam insulation can help save up to 50% in energy costs, protect a building from moisture intrusion, and provide sound insulation. In addition, it provides two to three times more insulation that traditional fiberglass.

However, according to Environmental Working Group, most common spray polyurethane foam insulation contains methylene diphenyl diisocyanate, or MDI, a synthetic chemical linked to asthma, lung damage and even death.

“Because of the chemical’s risks, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has set the maximum legal limit for MDI exposure among workers who handle it and related chemicals at 0.02 parts per million in workplace air,” reports EWG.

This is fine for professional installers, as they have the equipment necessary to protect them from MDI. But homeowners and DIY-ers may not even be aware of the danger.

spray foam insulationIn 2011, the EPA considered restricting or banning MDI’s use, but no action has been taken to date. Until that happens, here are some alternatives that are better for the environment and the people installing them:

1. Soybean-based spray foam – Not made with any added chemicals, including MDI, this product has the same insulation properties as spray foam. A portion of the petroleum base that makes up the product is replaced by soy. There is still petroleum in the product, though.

2. Castor oil spray foam – Castor oil is used in place of some of the petroleum, and the foam is applied with a water base, as opposed to the chemicals in other products.

3. Cotton denim and sheep’s wool batts – These two types of products cannot be sprayed in, but are tucked into the spaces between the studs. Neither is as efficient as foam, but they do not contain the added chemicals that are found in traditional fiberglass batts or in foam products.

Although all spray foam insulation is green in the fact that it saves energy, and all such products contain some petroleum by-products, not all products are created equal. This is another of those times when it pays to do your homework.

Source and Photo: Fairfield Citizen, dunktanktechnician through a Creative Commons License
I wouldn't insulate with ANYTHING organic or fibrous. The amount of condensation in a huge metal hallway is astounding. Won't take long for the shredded jeans to start smelling funny.
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Old 01-24-2017, 06:18 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepe View Post
Hi I am doing lots of research my self hope this help ...

Spray foam insulation can help save up to 50% in energy costs, protect a building from moisture intrusion, and provide sound insulation. In addition, it provides two to three times more insulation that traditional fiberglass.

However, according to Environmental Working Group, most common spray polyurethane foam insulation contains methylene diphenyl diisocyanate, or MDI, a synthetic chemical linked to asthma, lung damage and even death.

“Because of the chemical’s risks, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has set the maximum legal limit for MDI exposure among workers who handle it and related chemicals at 0.02 parts per million in workplace air,” reports EWG.

This is fine for professional installers, as they have the equipment necessary to protect them from MDI. But homeowners and DIY-ers may not even be aware of the danger.

spray foam insulationIn 2011, the EPA considered restricting or banning MDI’s use, but no action has been taken to date. Until that happens, here are some alternatives that are better for the environment and the people installing them:

1. Soybean-based spray foam – Not made with any added chemicals, including MDI, this product has the same insulation properties as spray foam. A portion of the petroleum base that makes up the product is replaced by soy. There is still petroleum in the product, though.

2. Castor oil spray foam – Castor oil is used in place of some of the petroleum, and the foam is applied with a water base, as opposed to the chemicals in other products.

3. Cotton denim and sheep’s wool batts – These two types of products cannot be sprayed in, but are tucked into the spaces between the studs. Neither is as efficient as foam, but they do not contain the added chemicals that are found in traditional fiberglass batts or in foam products.

Although all spray foam insulation is green in the fact that it saves energy, and all such products contain some petroleum by-products, not all products are created equal. This is another of those times when it pays to do your homework.

Source and Photo: Fairfield Citizen, dunktanktechnician through a Creative Commons License
I love the smell of spray foam in the morning.
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Old 01-24-2017, 07:26 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by pepe View Post
3. Cotton denim and sheep’s wool batts – These two types of products cannot be sprayed in, but are tucked into the spaces between the studs. Neither is as efficient as foam, but they do not contain the added chemicals that are found in traditional fiberglass batts or in foam products.

What about the chemicals added to the above to make them moisture resistant, insect resistant, rodent resistant, fire resistant, mold resistant, Also, cotton dust exposure and wool dust exposure causes major respiratory problems.
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Old 01-24-2017, 07:31 AM   #8
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"resistant" being the key word.
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