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Old 04-27-2016, 01:38 PM   #21
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You can do the same thing with sawdust, but depending on the brand of kitty litter they might have better odor control. I like it. Back to basics and it doesn't cost $1k. However I am thinking a gold plated heated toilet seat is where I'll invest.
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Old 04-27-2016, 03:34 PM   #22
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The wood stove isn't such a space hog, the wood itself takes a lot of room and it's always dirty and carries bugs. That's why people store their firewood outside.
Not to mention, but in a lot of places it's just plain illegal to carry firewood from one place to another, exactly for pest reasons. Emerald ash borer and such. Now, I know that this place is full of stories of people who drove a bright yellow school bus across country with no tags and the lights all stuck on flash, but I'm not gonna be the one to get hit with that damn fool ticket.

I plan on one of those little one cubic foot woodstoves fed with bricks of compressed sawdust that you can get at a lot of box stores. Clean, legal, and packed tightly for storage. A buck's worth will get you 2-4 hours of fire.
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:15 PM   #23
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That's not bat at all for a small stove. I've had a small stove for the past four years, but not as efficient as what you're talking about. Finally went out and got a medium size household stove that will hold a fire for 14 hours. It does take up more space but during the winter it's well worth it to wake up to a warm area after a good nights sleep.
Then again, since the weather is warmer I'm thinking of wheeling into a shed for the summer instead of hauling it around. I'm wanting a stove pipe going out one of the old high up blinkers, on the rear of the bus, that don't seem to have a purpose anymore.
And that's what I like about my minimalist setup. Upgrades are where I find them. Maybe I'll find one of those efficient stoves sometime. I really like that stove that has the oven in the bottom, but I don't like to carry expensive stuff in the bus.
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:21 PM   #24
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Finally went out and got a medium size household stove that will hold a fire for 14 hours.

I'm wanting a stove pipe going out one of the old high up blinkers, on the rear of the bus, that don't seem to have a purpose anymore.
You plan on cutting that light hole out even more to support an 8" chimney pipe?

14 hours worth of fire in a 4" chimney is going to leave quite a bit of monoxide with no where to go.....
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:35 PM   #25
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Does anybody put 8" chimney pipes in a bus? That's just more surface area for creosote to build up. My point is to avoid having a stove pipe sticking out one of the side windows. Actually I've been using 4" pipe and so far it seems to be doing ok because you can't run this size stove wide open in a bus this size anyway without having multiple windows open.
That's another good point. Like in a house with a wood stove you can open your windows during the winter without visualizing $$ going out the window.
And then there is the dry air issue from wood stoves that you don't get with propane. Besides, I think those old gypsy covered wagons didn't use propane.
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:39 PM   #26
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Are you familiar with the newer airtight stoves with that re-burn feature? The stove pipe is the only possible area any monoxide can possibly come out. There's very little ash, but dry wood is important for proper functioning.
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:40 PM   #27
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That was my question to you. You stated a 14 hour fire medium sized stove, I was just curious if you intended to load it that way and install a larger chimney pipe, that's all.

(Besides, think of all the money you'd save not buying a kiln to bake ceramics!!!)
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Old 04-27-2016, 05:18 PM   #28
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My idea was to throttle it down by using a smaller pipe so even if I'm not there and some idiot loads up the stove, it won't turn all my paint brown or worse. So far I've been using brick inside the stove to make a smaller burn chamber. It would be easy to put bread on the side area. I'll have to check the temp inside the stove next winter.
I actually make a lot of sourdough bread in the bus with my kenner easy bake oven (toaster oven). That would be pretty cool to make wood baked bread in the stove in the ceramic pottery previously made. Sounds like I need a bigger bus for all this.
And you know, if I had a back porch on here I'd enjoy a potters wheel out there. It's bad enough that I've got a small garage and wood stove in the back. Maybe a combo potters wheel/driver's area? I'm visualizing a spinning steering wheel with a lump of clay on it, drying rack in the middle, fired in the stove in the rear. Maybe in one of my stationary buses. I prefer raku.
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