Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-12-2018, 06:47 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Trying to set myself free!

Hi...I've spent the past few months researching different vehicles & tiny homes to decide which is the best way to be mortgage free. I feel like a short skoolie would be the best fit for me. So, I'm here to learn as much as I can to make the right purchase and then learn how to build it. 😊🤞 So tired of the rat race and don't want to wait until I'm 70+ to retire...and even at that age I wouldn't be able to afford a retirement in a brick and mortar lifestyle. Looking forward to meeting you all and learning as much as I can. So glad I found this forum.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 07:33 PM   #2
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 18,735
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsyfiredance View Post
Hi...I've spent the past few months researching different vehicles & tiny homes to decide which is the best way to be mortgage free. I feel like a short skoolie would be the best fit for me. So, I'm here to learn as much as I can to make the right purchase and then learn how to build it. 😊🤞 So tired of the rat race and don't want to wait until I'm 70+ to retire...and even at that age I wouldn't be able to afford a retirement in a brick and mortar lifestyle. Looking forward to meeting you all and learning as much as I can. So glad I found this forum.
First thing you need to find out for certain-
Where would you park it and live in it?
May need land, thus you may need a mortgage.

Or rent a spot in a trailer park.

Or live at truck stops, nat'l parks, and walmart.

I'm basically having to buy land way out in the county to continue my bus life.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 08:23 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
I currently have a home with RV space. I plan on letting my equity grow for another 3 years and then sell it to buy a tiny home for cash as home base and a cash for a small plot of land to put it on. So I'll still need to pay property tax. I want to get the skoolie now to start work on it as I save up for each piece of the build but have cash to buy a used bus now. Travel 6 months out of the year to free BLM lands and Walmarts & truck stops as needed. And work part - time and save for my travels the other 6 months out of the year but not having to do the crazy 10-12 hr days anymore that my current payroll accountting job demands. Juat dancing and other odds and ends jobs that are less demanding on my time. Plus close to early retirement age for social security and Medicare �� That's plan A anyways. Plan B is to be a full time nomad which I'm 100% fine with...just my graduating teen girls aren't 100% ok with me being gone all the time LoL

Thank you for the additional thoughts to consider. All advice is welcomed so I can make the best decision for my future early retirement.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 09:04 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsyfiredance View Post
Hi...I've spent the past few months researching different vehicles & tiny homes to decide which is the best way to be mortgage free. I feel like a short skoolie would be the best fit for me. So, I'm here to learn as much as I can to make the right purchase and then learn how to build it. 😊🤞 So tired of the rat race and don't want to wait until I'm 70+ to retire...and even at that age I wouldn't be able to afford a retirement in a brick and mortar lifestyle. Looking forward to meeting you all and learning as much as I can. So glad I found this forum.



I'm in the same boat as you! The thought of taking on a mortgage sends shivers down my spine. I'm only 22 and already thinking about retirement.


Also on a side note, what kind of fire dancing do you do? I spin fire poi, but I've haven't performed at all!
Jibbs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 10:46 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
oricha1984's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 897
Chassis: GMC or Chevrolet, I hope
Engine: gasser probably
this might be my socialist/communist view, but I always found it very odd how here in USA people buy a house and work all their lives to pay it off.
There is brainwashing in every society/culture.

Anyhow back to topic,
I plan to buy a piece of land in the near future to play around with. Maybe drop a school bus and turn it into a camper.
But, I have to pay off my house first . . .
__________________
the more i learn, the less I know what to buy . . .
oricha1984 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 11:14 PM   #6
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Jibbs I was just talking to my teens about how much mortgage sucks the life out of you. Once upon a time people could work for one company, buy a home me for a decent price, pay it off in 30 years, retire mortgage free with a pension good social security, health insurance at a decent age. That's no longer the case for many people. I'm a home owner, but had to sell to get a chunk to put back in savings and put some towards another house..then do it all over again every 2 to 3 years. And you're never really a 'home owner' if you owe the bank. So on the next sale I have to go through I'm taking that huge chunk of equity to invest in a small chunk of land to drop a tiny home, that I've paid cash for, on. But I also have a wander lust and can't stay in one place for more than 2 years without getting antsy. So the mobile tiny home of a converted bus will satisfy that.

Yay...a fellow fire spinner. I spin professionally on the side as my side hustle...good quick side money. I spin hoops, buugeng, long string leviwand, staff, fans, fire eat & fleshing...and just picked up a rope dart that I'm learning.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 11:20 PM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by oricha1984 View Post
this might be my socialist/communist view, but I always found it very odd how here in USA people buy a house and work all their lives to pay it off.
There is brainwashing in every society/culture.

Anyhow back to topic,
I plan to buy a piece of land in the near future to play around with. Maybe drop a school bus and turn it into a camper.
But, I have to pay off my house first . . .
I completely understand...we're all just hamsters running around on the corporate wheel in a vicious cycle! Gotta make more money to buy more things and then makepre money to buy more things. Consumerism. I'm ready to live minimally so that I can have more time to actually enjoy life instead of being exhausted and stressed all of the time.

Wishing you the best that your plans work out.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 05:51 AM   #8
Site Team
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 998
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Howdy and welcome gypsyfiredance!

I was once told to retire "to something" rather than "from something." I think that applies to this style of living. I suspect many folks get into the RV/bus lifestyle to 'get away' and find themselves a bit unhappy. Just something to think about...

It sounds like you want a rig that is fully self sufficient for reasonable periods of time and that is somewhat different than many folks (though not uncommon). There is no right/wrong but having the mission/goal in mind is important. Like you, my goal was a boondocking machine - able to stay in remote places for long periods of time.

I don't mean to discourage but be aware that a conversion is not cheap or easy. That seems to be the general idea and it seems some folks get in way over their head. I often wonder if a small/used RV would be a better choice for many - at least as a starting point to kinda figure out if they like the lifestyle as well as to learn about the systems and what they want in their own conversion.

Best of luck and keep posting!
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 06:23 AM   #9
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 7
"I don't mean to discourage but be aware that a conversion is not cheap or easy. That seems to be the general idea and it seems some folks get in way over their head. I often wonder if a small/used RV would be a better choice for many - at least as a starting point to kinda figure out if they like the lifestyle as well as to learn about the systems and what they want in their own conversion."

Words of wisdom, right there.

Welcome to the forum, gypsyfiredance!
TipsVinny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 07:45 AM   #10
Skoolie
 
thrifty1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Upstate, SC
Posts: 164
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International
Engine: DTA360
Trying to set myself free!

Welcome, and JD is right. My conversion is draining my life force right now but I still work 50 hour weeks. Plus 2 toddlers yada yada... If you plan on going the conversion route just know that there will be many many expensive tools involved (basic impact driver to miter saw)and many medium to high level skills needed (electrical knowledge, plumbing, propane hookup etc.) From metal framework repair to figuring out your grey tank mounting position relative to the sink and what to bolt it to. BUT I will say I do not regret going down this road one bit, and it has been a great learning experience. Just be prepared for some serious planning lol.
thrifty1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 01:03 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Rivetboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Huntington beach
Posts: 701
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: T/C 2000 28 foot Handy Bus
Engine: Cummins 5.9 Mechanical
Rated Cap: 2
"I'm only 22 and already thinking about retirement."

My crystal ball says you are going to have a good retirement.
Rivetboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:19 PM   #12
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivetboy View Post
"I'm only 22 and already thinking about retirement."

My crystal ball says you are going to have a good retirement.
Yay! Thanks for the good karma blessing/vote of confidence. Wishing you all the luck in your journey as well. Onward and upward!!
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:28 PM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDOnTheGo View Post
Howdy and welcome gypsyfiredance!

I was once told to retire "to something" rather than "from something." I think that applies to this style of living. I suspect many folks get into the RV/bus lifestyle to 'get away' and find themselves a bit unhappy. Just something to think about...

It sounds like you want a rig that is fully self sufficient for reasonable periods of time and that is somewhat different than many folks (though not uncommon). There is no right/wrong but having the mission/goal in mind is important. Like you, my goal was a boondocking machine - able to stay in remote places for long periods of time.

I don't mean to discourage but be aware that a conversion is not cheap or easy. That seems to be the general idea and it seems some folks get in way over their head. I often wonder if a small/used RV would be a better choice for many - at least as a starting point to kinda figure out if they like the lifestyle as well as to learn about the systems and what they want in their own conversion.

Best of luck and keep posting!
Thanks for all the thoughtful information. I'm actually a very independent woman who doesn't mind a whole lot of alone time. I think I'm pretty good company and I'm bringing my furbabies along for the ride too. I'm also part of a huge burningman community and have expert friends I can go to for construction help, electrical plumbing & even welding. I've also never been afraid to learn new skills and thrive on it. I taught myself some basic furniture making and have built kids furniture for my kiddos when they were younger. I've also learned how to make a bucket swamp cooler and how to wire solar panels from some burningman workshops. I'd like to also take a basic mechanics class to learn how to do basic repairs on the bus. I love setting a good example to my teen girls about how to be a self sufficient independent woman by example. I know it's going to be a challenge but I'm not a fan of any RVs I see or the higher cost.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:32 PM   #14
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TipsVinny View Post
"I don't mean to discourage but be aware that a conversion is not cheap or easy. That seems to be the general idea and it seems some folks get in way over their head. I often wonder if a small/used RV would be a better choice for many - at least as a starting point to kinda figure out if they like the lifestyle as well as to learn about the systems and what they want in their own conversion."

Words of wisdom, right there.

Welcome to the forum, gypsyfiredance!
Thanks Tips Vinny.

I did used to have a travel trailer as well. And done quite a few spontaneous trips in an SUV and just slept in the back of it
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 05:49 PM   #15
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by thrifty1 View Post
Welcome, and JD is right. My conversion is draining my life force right now but I still work 50 hour weeks. Plus 2 toddlers yada yada... If you plan on going the conversion route just know that there will be many many expensive tools involved (basic impact driver to miter saw)and many medium to high level skills needed (electrical knowledge, plumbing, propane hookup etc.) From metal framework repair to figuring out your grey tank mounting position relative to the sink and what to bolt it to. BUT I will say I do not regret going down this road one bit, and it has been a great learning experience. Just be prepared for some serious planning lol.
Thanks so much for the input from someone pulling crazy hours like myself. I don't plan on doing the part-time retirement for another 3 years, which is why I'd like to start planning and construction now. So, I won't have to stress on time. I also have a friend who did a full conversion on a big school bus and lives full time in it. So, I'm sure I'll be asking him lots and lots of advice. I'm seeing from all of the posts here and videos that this will be a daunting task...but, also up for a good challenge. I've always been a fiesty person. LoL And, what a feeling at the end to be able to see the finished project and say...I did 'most' of that. haha..I plan on having pro's (licensed friends) do the gas, electrical, and plumbing for safety reasons...there's only so much I can learn in a short amount of time. Keeping the great advice and in your face honesty coming everyone...I can use it all.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 07:04 PM   #16
Bus Nut
 
mikeypj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Iowa
Posts: 444
Year: 1989
Chassis: International
Engine: 9.L
Rated Cap: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
First thing you need to find out for certain-
Where would you park it and live in it?
May need land, thus you may need a mortgage.

Or rent a spot in a trailer park.

Or live at truck stops, nat'l parks, and walmart.

I'm basically having to buy land way out in the county to continue my bus life.
Buying land and parking my bus there is how im planning my retirement
mikeypj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 10:42 PM   #17
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,462
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Best to plan on retiring TO something...not FROM something.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 06:25 AM   #18
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 11,947
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
I guess different strokes for different folks.. but the mortgage on my house (a really nice house) is less than a 1 bedroom apartment in most cities.. then again im an on-grid city-lover so obviously different than most here..



I dont look at my mortgage as anything more than glorified rent... its really what it is.. im not sure I could live on my own plot of land in a bus with things like internet, clean water, septic or sewer, electricity (outskirts electric rates are often much higher than in town).. and the like for what I pay at the house... going off-grid mitigates some of those costs.. and lowering quality of life also mitigates costs as well.. (sweaters instead of heat.. sweating instead of A/C)..



anyway the biggest thing if you go to buy land is what they will and wont allow on it.. ie if you are going to rough-it for life without utilities.. or if you buy land close enough to a town or township to have electricity.. what kind of water table is there? is a water well feasible? or is it arsenic-water or too deep to drill, are you allowed to put a bus on it? we have heard of certain places that say "sorry no mobile homes".. or RVs as permanent residences.. if you plan to also build a tiny home and then have your bus as a travel vehicle, than the last point is likely mitigated.. but if the plan is to have the bus as your home and park it there X number of months per year, check the legalities..



technically it should be YOUR land. but even land you bought for cash seemingly outside of city limits doesnt seem to really be your land... grrr..


-Christopher
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 07:40 AM   #19
Site Team
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 998
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsyfiredance View Post
Thanks for all the thoughtful information. I'm actually a very independent woman who doesn't mind a whole lot of alone time.
Sounds like we should meet!!

It is a very doable plan, I just like to warn folks that it is not as quick and easy as some videos would have you believe. Sounds like you get that.

You are in the right part of the country for the plan and have a good/realistic time frame/schedule as well.

I don't get into the "what is the best way to live my life" discussions as there are just too many variables. I can't even figure out how to live MY life - certainly not qualified to advise someone else!!!

I'm one of the ones that has traveled all over the west by RV (boondocking) and loved it. However; I had a hankering for a seasonal place of my own - for a variety of reasons - so purchased a chunk of unrestricted land in the middle of the forest, in the middle of nowhere (top of the continental divide), and love it. Thankfully, most people can't stand this level of solitude so not many people around. I guess my point is that a piece of land can work if you can find the right one. Christopher's point is good - watch out for restrictions!

I'm not sure that living off-grid automatically means a lower quality of life. I suspect it is true in many circumstances as it often means low income and so forth. It may have more to do with ones personality than anything?? I have some friends that would consider they way I live to be very 'low' as there is not a Starbucks next door, no restaurants to go to dinner at every night, no sporting events to go to, etc... I don't particularly care for any of those things. However; I do like being able to walk/ride MTB for miles thru the forest, seeing deer and elk out my window, and hearing nothing but birds and the breeze. I don't feel like I live significantly different than I did in my S&B home but I'm probably the exception and not the norm - largely because I'm very strange. I suppose the big differences are things like when I do laundry, the occasional cold shower, and some amount of energy conservation during the winter months?? Have to think about that some more. I'm rambling... sorry... I guess my point, I think, is that it is what you make of it and it certainly isn't for everyone.
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 05:44 PM   #20
Mini-Skoolie
 
gypsyfiredance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: California
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
I guess different strokes for different folks.. but the mortgage on my house (a really nice house) is less than a 1 bedroom apartment in most cities.. then again im an on-grid city-lover so obviously different than most here..



I dont look at my mortgage as anything more than glorified rent... its really what it is.. im not sure I could live on my own plot of land in a bus with things like internet, clean water, septic or sewer, electricity (outskirts electric rates are often much higher than in town).. and the like for what I pay at the house... going off-grid mitigates some of those costs.. and lowering quality of life also mitigates costs as well.. (sweaters instead of heat.. sweating instead of A/C)..



anyway the biggest thing if you go to buy land is what they will and wont allow on it.. ie if you are going to rough-it for life without utilities.. or if you buy land close enough to a town or township to have electricity.. what kind of water table is there? is a water well feasible? or is it arsenic-water or too deep to drill, are you allowed to put a bus on it? we have heard of certain places that say "sorry no mobile homes".. or RVs as permanent residences.. if you plan to also build a tiny home and then have your bus as a travel vehicle, than the last point is likely mitigated.. but if the plan is to have the bus as your home and park it there X number of months per year, check the legalities..



technically it should be YOUR land. but even land you bought for cash seemingly outside of city limits doesnt seem to really be your land... grrr..


-Christopher

All so true...my plan A is to build a tiny home on a small plot of land as home base where I can work part time seasonally. It wouldn't be an "off grid" tiny home. And, have the bus as a traveling home away from home. A female friend of mine half my age built her own tiny home so that she could pursue her passions as a career. The current situation I'm in...my income needs and expensive mortgage drives what type of work I need to do and I feel like I'm a slave to my job. I would rather live more minimally so that I can actually work in a field that is more fullfilling, less stressful, less hours so and one that fills me with more of a sense of purpose that one that I hate being at and one that is sucking the life out of me.
gypsyfiredance is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
#newbie

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×