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Old 05-20-2019, 07:02 PM   #31
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Your idea is great however finding the liability insurance to get up and running could be prohibitive. Especially in Mass.
Hopefully you've already addressed that.
Just something else to ponder...
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Old 05-20-2019, 07:21 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
Okay, so understanding now a little more about what you're trying to bring to market, I do have an idea that could be marketable - you can design and construct modular components specifically engineered to easily adapt to be used in skoolies. Take for example the idea of an overhead storage cabinet, simple in theory but many people would spend a lot of time and trial and error attempting to fit the odd radius of the roof but if a DIY cabinet shell was readily available for purchase then some would rather pay for their own sanity's sake than let that little step sink their project. That's just an example but I hope it illustrates what I'm talking about.

As for the idea of a skoolie used less for RV residence and more like a scaled up conversion van from the 90s for family road trips, well I'm totally on board with that! What I'm doing for my own is a hybrid... I'm single so living simply is easy enough but I also love to take my niece and nephews on road trips. It'll kind of become our family 'thing' to skoolie-tour America!

great ideas excecpt every bus is different.. a carpenter, a bluebird of one year vs another, a thomas RE vs a thomas FS-65 vs a C2.. all have different rooflines, ceiling heights and wall. onfigurations..



this is like people that make Bolt-ons for street rods.. most so called "bolt-ons" require some modification or fabrication to fit.. sure you could make a kit to mounta minisplit under a bus.. or a cabinet that would fit a specific model, but honestly doing the Demo.. tearing up the floor, removing the seats is a good primer and "initiation" so to say for someone doing a comversion..



BGA busses will do all the prep work to busses they sell.. and it can be a negotiation tool for their high prices.. buit I have seen busses in there where they fixed massive floor rust, even raised a roof for someone.. paint busses, remove seats and they did a couple where they fabriacted a generator mount underneathg, wired the bus and installed 2 coleman rooftop camper A/C;s for someone doing a conversion..

-Christopher
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Old 05-21-2019, 08:53 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
great ideas excecpt every bus is different.. a carpenter, a bluebird of one year vs another, a thomas RE vs a thomas FS-65 vs a C2.. all have different rooflines, ceiling heights and wall. onfigurations..



this is like people that make Bolt-ons for street rods.. most so called "bolt-ons" require some modification or fabrication to fit.. sure you could make a kit to mounta minisplit under a bus.. or a cabinet that would fit a specific model, but honestly doing the Demo.. tearing up the floor, removing the seats is a good primer and "initiation" so to say for someone doing a comversion..



BGA busses will do all the prep work to busses they sell.. and it can be a negotiation tool for their high prices.. buit I have seen busses in there where they fixed massive floor rust, even raised a roof for someone.. paint busses, remove seats and they did a couple where they fabriacted a generator mount underneathg, wired the bus and installed 2 coleman rooftop camper A/C;s for someone doing a conversion..

-Christopher
You are right there! I bought some aftermarket LED lamps for my pickup that were supposed to be DIY plug-n-play but they took so much modifications and had so many issues that I was seriously about to throw them away and eat the cost. They're still not right but so long as I have legal lights I'll deal with the rest another day.

I was just offering a suggested alternative if they decide that there's not a strong enough market for built-to-order skoolies but they still have a passion for repurposing materials. If someone has a good design for a sofa/bed or futon that fits my needs with minor mods I'd much rather buy that than try to build one myself - it just feels like I'm reinventing the wheel. I have a bunch of ideas that I think are cool but that doesn't mean anyone else sees any value in them. But that's the beauty of entrepreneurialism is that often times you can bring something to market that people didn't even know that could use until they see what you're offering and then they can't live without it!
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Old 05-21-2019, 10:09 PM   #34
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I would personally rather see a bus dealer do all the basic maintenance (replace fluids and filters and air driers etc. and check everything out) and make sure the bus is mechanically sound.
To me this is more important than a gutted bus. You’re buying an old commercial truck that has hundreds of thousands of miles on it. Mechanical reliability and safety is top priority, and you’re already behind the curve buying used bus. Call Bluebird and Thomas and see what a brand new stripped down shell would cost. Then you would have a brand new vehicle with warranty, and a true blank slate to start with. Do top quality Engineering and build and you might be able to sell them to the high end rv crowd that can afford them and appreciate an rv built on a solid, reliable chassis. Think of the old bluebird wanderlodges.
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Old 05-25-2019, 04:47 PM   #35
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Welcome! I have been looking for the last 3 months and obviously, not very successful! I, too was trying to figure out how to start a new thread, and also not very successful. I guess from an iPhone is not easy to find the tabs... and they don’t like it, when people ask “stupid” questions. From all the research, I have done without asking any “stupid” questions, I have yet to find anyone who has shells. But if you’re looking for multiple buses, it’s going to get a bit pricey. You may not want to go that way, unless you have a lot of capital to invest. What would you do with the rest of the rest of the units? Anyway, good luck, and please do share your findings!!
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Old 05-25-2019, 05:42 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by dgorila1 View Post
To me this is more important than a gutted bus. You’re buying an old commercial truck that has hundreds of thousands of miles on it. Mechanical reliability and safety is top priority, and you’re already behind the curve buying used bus. Call Bluebird and Thomas and see what a brand new stripped down shell would cost. Then you would have a brand new vehicle with warranty, and a true blank slate to start with. Do top quality Engineering and build and you might be able to sell them to the high end rv crowd that can afford them and appreciate an rv built on a solid, reliable chassis. Think of the old bluebird wanderlodges.
I seriously doubt much mechanical maintenance gets done to a bus at the commercial sales lots. They inspect the buses they buy and seldom buy the crappy ones. They then take that bus back to their yard where they check the fluids, if you're lucky, they top them off, really lucky, they actually change them. They wash em and stick em on the lot. For this service instead of the $1-2K for removing seats, they have done about $500 worth of work and then mark it up $3k.
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Old 05-26-2019, 12:46 PM   #37
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I’ld seriously consider buying a 2k bus for you from the south, take the seats out and rip up the flooring if you’ll buy it and pick it up for 4k-5k lol.
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Old 05-26-2019, 12:57 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by rydawg3000 View Post
I’ld seriously consider buying a 2k bus for you from the south, take the seats out and rip up the flooring if you’ll buy it and pick it up for 4k-5k lol.
I've done that before!
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Old 05-26-2019, 11:52 PM   #39
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I used a pneumatic impact to get the seats out. That was the easy part. That subfloor though .
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:40 AM   #40
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We were crazy lucky: the bus we purchased (We are in NW Florida) only had rubber directly connected to the metal floor, no wooden subfloor in between , rubber came up in big clean rolls.
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