Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-01-2018, 03:26 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
DreamWeaverBus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: So Ill
Posts: 225
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freightliner
Anchors

So I have an idea I wanna blow by people... lol

So say a big storm is coming your way. I remember reading in some FB groups posts by skoolie people who were stuck in Hurricane Irma, no gas to move, or just decided to wait it out and see...

And I had already thought about what I would do in a bus in the event of a storm. Here in So Ill, a tornado is more likely than a hurricane. But they say, don't try to outrun a tornado. So what's a skoolie to do?

Well I wondered if anyone has something like anchors? For example, I was thinking of having steel bars attached to the sides of the bus, perhaps 3-4 per side, that would lengthen out once you lifted them, allowing you to anchor them in the ground perhaps 16-20 feet away, like drill a big screw in or something at the ends.

Would this prevent the bus from rocking or being blown over when stationary? Would the anchors help keep the bus from being pulled up?

Now I know that to the right storm, it won't matter what you do: bus or house, everything in it's path is coming up.

But would such measures extend the strength of the storm it could weather?

I just had a thought: those steel bars could make the bus side heavy, perhaps make turns sway more? BUT, instead of having them attached to the sides, perhaps you could unhook them from something at the top, and lay them lengthwise on something at the sides under the bus?

Guess there's lots of ways you could do this, cheapest way is prolly just ropes and spikes. But if you plan on being somewhere where the weather is wild, what do you think?

I think I saw an idea like this on that old Twister movie... lol

I would love to be a storm chaser skoolie...
DreamWeaverBus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 03:44 PM   #2
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 6,409
Coachwork: 97 Bluebird TC1000 5.9
I'd go park by a large structure for a wind break. If there were no wind breaks I'd park with my arse headed into the wind to protect my windshield.

Also, don''t park broadside in a hurricane.
__________________
Robin
Nobody's Business
Robin97396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 03:49 PM   #3
Skoolie
 
DreamWeaverBus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: So Ill
Posts: 225
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freightliner
yeah, ass to the wind is best...
DreamWeaverBus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 04:13 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Jdawgsfanasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamWeaverBus View Post
So I have an idea I wanna blow by people... lol

So say a big storm is coming your way. I remember reading in some FB groups posts by skoolie people who were stuck in Hurricane Irma, no gas to move, or just decided to wait it out and see...

And I had already thought about what I would do in a bus in the event of a storm. Here in So Ill, a tornado is more likely than a hurricane. But they say, don't try to outrun a tornado. So what's a skoolie to do?

Well I wondered if anyone has something like anchors? For example, I was thinking of having steel bars attached to the sides of the bus, perhaps 3-4 per side, that would lengthen out once you lifted them, allowing you to anchor them in the ground perhaps 16-20 feet away, like drill a big screw in or something at the ends.

Would this prevent the bus from rocking or being blown over when stationary? Would the anchors help keep the bus from being pulled up?

Now I know that to the right storm, it won't matter what you do: bus or house, everything in it's path is coming up.

But would such measures extend the strength of the storm it could weather?

I just had a thought: those steel bars could make the bus side heavy, perhaps make turns sway more? BUT, instead of having them attached to the sides, perhaps you could unhook them from something at the top, and lay them lengthwise on something at the sides under the bus?

Guess there's lots of ways you could do this, cheapest way is prolly just ropes and spikes. But if you plan on being somewhere where the weather is wild, what do you think?

I think I saw an idea like this on that old Twister movie... lol

I would love to be a storm chaser skoolie...
Something like this...with straps around the frame rails...but nothing gonna help with a tornado...anyway, you put steel bars in the square steel tubes (2' long bars) and drive them into the ground

Sent from my VS500PP using Tapatalk
Jdawgsfanasty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 04:29 PM   #5
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Owasso, OK
Posts: 2,627
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP ER
Engine: Cummins 6CTA8.3 Mechanical MD3060
Rated Cap: 46 Coach Seats, 40 foot
I live close to Tulsa.

Despite the common jokes and cartoons, in Tulsa we take bad weather very seriously, because the weather can kill you.

Unequivocally, one of the worst places to be in a tornado is inside a vehicle, any vehicle with any anchoring system, ever.

You might be able to make a vehicle remain on the ground in all but the most severe conditions, but what you cannot do without armor-plating is make it safe from flying debris.

A tornado can send a 2x4 at your bus, at over 250 mph. The standard for stopping that from penetrating is a brick wall backed by 3" of concrete, or steel plate of 1/4" thickness.

Tornadoes can pick up semis ... and drop them anywhere. Your bus is tough, but a semi dropped on it would ruin your entire day.
__________________
Steve Bracken

Build Thread
Twigg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 04:46 PM   #6
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,462
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
One of the advantages of a Skoolie is that when bad weather is headed your way...you can drive off. Hurricanes give you plenty of time...tornadoes...not so much. But it doesn't take long to crank up and go. Just keep your battery charged up & tank topped off.

And a good emergency band weather radio is always worth having on the road.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 05:24 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Owasso, OK
Posts: 2,627
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP ER
Engine: Cummins 6CTA8.3 Mechanical MD3060
Rated Cap: 46 Coach Seats, 40 foot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
One of the advantages of a Skoolie is that when bad weather is headed your way...you can drive off. Hurricanes give you plenty of time...tornadoes...not so much. But it doesn't take long to crank up and go. Just keep your battery charged up & tank topped off.

And a good emergency band weather radio is always worth having on the road.
There is a lot you can do, even though individual tornado warnings don't give much time, and sometimes don't give any time.

While tornadoes are common, in any individual spot on the map they are really rare. When you are camping you know where you are. You can see the storm development on radar, and the formation of tornadic super-cells with plenty of time to get out of the way.

When bad weather is in the forecast, keep a very close ear on the radio. Use your cellphone or laptop to track the storms. You will see if a line, or cell is approaching and you don't need to go very far, perpendicular to the line, to be perfectly safe.

The problem we have is that we can't move our houses, but we can move an RV.
__________________
Steve Bracken

Build Thread
Twigg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 05:29 PM   #8
Skoolie
 
DreamWeaverBus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: So Ill
Posts: 225
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freightliner
Yeah, when you put it like that, taking off seems obvious.

So tell me about driving a school bus in high wind speeds? Common during storms and sounds like a nope.
DreamWeaverBus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 05:38 PM   #9
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Owasso, OK
Posts: 2,627
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP ER
Engine: Cummins 6CTA8.3 Mechanical MD3060
Rated Cap: 46 Coach Seats, 40 foot
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamWeaverBus View Post
Yeah, when you put it like that, taking off seems obvious.

So tell me about driving a school bus in high wind speeds? Common during storms and sounds like a nope.
I've never driven a bus in high wind.

I have ridden a motorcycle through a 50 to 70 mph gust front of a storm line.

The wind was coming at me and it wasn't the worst part of it, although it was bad enough. The worst part was the horizontal driven rain that cut visibility to a few feet.

It didn't last more than a mile or two, although the regular rain lasted about 100 miles because the line was moving in the worst direction it could have been moving for my route.

It's not something I want to do again. I would have stopped, but I was on a remote part of I-40 and there was just nowhere to go.
__________________
Steve Bracken

Build Thread
Twigg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2018, 07:35 PM   #10
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 6,409
Coachwork: 97 Bluebird TC1000 5.9
And when there is a hail storm there is never an overpass in sight.
__________________
Robin
Nobody's Business
Robin97396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.