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Old 06-09-2015, 10:08 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
Why is taking out the interior sheet metal better?
Often the insulation between the original walls is damp. Essentially a sponge rotting away the bus from the inside out.

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Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
Framing/insulating over the existing interior sheet metal gives me more insulation. But it may sacrifice an inch or two of interior width.
No, it's gives you less insulation for the amount of space used. You're looking at it backwards.
Let's say you put 3.5" inches thick insulation onto the original interior walls. If you removed the interior walls you could have put 6" thick insulation for the same distance wall-to-wall.
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Old 06-09-2015, 11:18 PM   #12
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Plus you never know whats hiding behind that paneling...
See my thread. Many hours spent repairing the damage.
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Old 06-10-2015, 12:05 AM   #13
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The op needs to go read some build threads.

|It's all there waiting to be read. This has all been covered over and over and over again.

Spoon feeding info like this is a waste of every ones time, and does a poor job of explaining vary detailed topics.

So please OP, go do some reading here on this great site, and you will see in detail how to do most everything in 10 or more different ways.

There are pro's and cons to every different system and method.

To get you started.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/ar...rust-8870.html

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...ime-10138.html

And a ton more where they came from.

Nat
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Old 06-10-2015, 07:59 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
The op needs to go read some build threads.

|It's all there waiting to be read. This has all been covered over and over and over again.

Spoon feeding info like this is a waste of every ones time, and does a poor job of explaining vary detailed topics.

So please OP, go do some reading here on this great site, and you will see in detail how to do most everything in 10 or more different ways.

There are pro's and cons to every different system and method.

To get you started.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/ar...rust-8870.html

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...ime-10138.html

And a ton more where they came from.

Nat
Thanks for the info. I'll do some more looking around.
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Old 06-10-2015, 08:22 AM   #15
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The op needs to go read some build threads.
Nat
I have read quite a few build threads, searched the site many times, and have yet to see any reference to attaching studs to anything, with any detail. Maybe I missed the post(s). So that was a trial an error thing for me, using every bit of my common sense and carpentry skill(which I acquired in trade for my Pet Rock collection). The Bespoke wall studs and cabinets are firmly attached, and have not come loose in almost 40 miles of driving so far, and hope they continue.

Like I said, I experimented with brackets, screws and other techniques, but would encourage you use the stud channels on the ceiling (where the rivets are located) as this seems to be much stronger than simple sheet metal (but what do I know?)

some pics





these are the screws I HIGHLY recommend - no threat of these penetrating the outer skin.



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Old 06-10-2015, 12:07 PM   #16
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I have read quite a few build threads, searched the site many times, and have yet to see any reference to attaching studs to anything, with any detail. Maybe I missed the post(s).
Go back to my first post and rear the two build threads I linked. Both have a ton of detailed pics.

That's because we run our studs horizontal, not vertical.

We call it strapping.

Far stronger, better system in every way.

The method you use will depend on skill, money, tools, and How long you want the bus to last.
I need my bus to last 30 to 40 years. Not removing the inside skin, rotted fiberglass insulation, rustproofing, ect will result in a bus that may only last 3 to 5 years.

Also many of these low buck, slapped togeather builds are the reason why most insurance companys will no longer insure skoolie conversions.

So folks, choose your method and live with it.

Nat
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Old 06-10-2015, 12:13 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dredman View Post
I have read quite a few build threads, searched the site many times, and have yet to see any reference to attaching studs to anything, with any detail. Maybe I missed the post(s). So that was a trial an error thing for me, using every bit of my common sense and carpentry skill(which I acquired in trade for my Pet Rock collection). The Bespoke wall studs and cabinets are firmly attached, and have not come loose in almost 40 miles of driving so far, and hope they continue.

Like I said, I experimented with brackets, screws and other techniques, but would encourage you use the stud channels on the ceiling (where the rivets are located) as this seems to be much stronger than simple sheet metal (but what do I know?)

some pics





these are the screws I HIGHLY recommend - no threat of these penetrating the outer skin.



The ceiling panels are very thin. Like 20 or 18 ga. I wouldn't want a whole lot of stuff screwed to them.
Different strokes for different folks, though.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:17 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
The method you use will depend on skill, money, tools, and How long you want the bus to last.
Brother you nailed it there. Currently I lack all of the above, but mostly time. I may gut the entire bus at some point, I just can't do it the "right way" right now. I may not ever be able to do a conversion like some of you pros do, as I do not have the skills, and collecting the tools would require me to slow down and stop - which defeats the purpose of my mobile lifestyle. My guess is there are more people like me out there than people that have the amazing skills you guys have.

I would like to be able to share an alternative with the folks like me, that are OK with a half-assed camper build, in lieu of a Prevost-style conversion.

I wonder, how many other conversions there are like mine, not gutting the inside ceilings, or floors?
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:44 PM   #19
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The majority don't do the gutting.
Its a LOT of work.

I'm not building a "prevost" but I want real insulation and I want the bus to stay together more than a year or so.
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Old 06-10-2015, 02:16 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
The majority don't do the gutting.
Its a LOT of work.

I'm not building a "prevost" but I want real insulation and I want the bus to stay together more than a year or so.
Same here.
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