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Old 06-09-2015, 01:27 PM   #1
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Attaching studs to sheet metal

What's the best way to attach the studs to the sheet metal? I'm a little concerned about leaks if I use screws. Would adhesives be better? What did yall use?
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:58 PM   #2
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?? You would need very long screws to puncture the exterior sheet metal wall.

Typically the original walls are built like this: exterior sheet metal; metal ribs and crap insulation (about 2.5-3" thick); the interior sheet metal.

If you have removed the interior sheet metal (recommended) then you would re-insulate with something better and put "studs" horizontally on the ribs.

If the walls are staying original then you can screw right onto the interior sheet metal.
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:51 PM   #3
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So a 3" screw through my 2" stud should keep me from puncturing the wall? Is there any benefit to painting the interior walls/floor with bedliner when it comes to moisture protection?
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:06 PM   #4
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Right. 1" into the interior sheet metal will not touch the exterior sheet metal.

If you're covering over the interior walls anyway, I'd advise prying a panel back to see what you're dealing with.

You may see the insulation (or lack thereof) and consider a different approach. Remember, insulation isn't only for cold climates. Insulation slows the transfer of heat both outward and inward. Hell, in Texas it's probably equally important to keep the interior cool in the summer as it is in Canada to keep the interior warm in the winter.
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Old 06-09-2015, 05:38 PM   #5
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And here's what that crappy insulation looks like


My plan is to get rid of all of it and replace with rigid foam
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Old 06-09-2015, 06:04 PM   #6
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^yours looks nice compared to the batting that came out of mine. Mine was moldy and disgusting!
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Old 06-09-2015, 07:06 PM   #7
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I was thinking that I don't want to mess with the stock insulation or peeling back sheet metal. I was planning on framing the walls over the existing interior sheet metal and insulating that with some foam board.

What about insulating the floor? Do I just put foam board over the metal but below the plywood floor? That doesn't seem very sturdy?
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Old 06-09-2015, 07:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
I was thinking that I don't want to mess with the stock insulation or peeling back sheet metal. I was planning on framing the walls over the existing interior sheet metal and insulating that with some foam board.
That works for a quick and dirty solution... Taking it apart is more work, but you'll end up with a better product.

Quote:
Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
What about insulating the floor? Do I just put foam board over the metal but below the plywood floor? That doesn't seem very sturdy?
Rigid (as in XPS, the pink or blue stuff) foam with 5/8" or 3/4" plywood over top is incredibly strong.
You can lay cement over XPS, then vehicles over the cement. It's more than strong enough to support humans.
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Old 06-09-2015, 07:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
I was thinking that I don't want to mess with the stock insulation or peeling back sheet metal. I was planning on framing the walls over the existing interior sheet metal and insulating that with some foam board.

What about insulating the floor? Do I just put foam board over the metal but below the plywood floor? That doesn't seem very sturdy?
Taking out the interior panels is a huge amount of work. But totally worth it.
You don't HAVE to. But like mentioned above- it will end up better as a result of all that hard work.
Foam under plywood is what many of us are using. Spray foam underneath the floors is another option.
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Old 06-09-2015, 09:56 PM   #10
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Why is taking out the interior sheet metal better? Framing/insulating over the existing interior sheet metal gives me more insulation. But it may sacrifice an inch or two of interior width.
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