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Old 05-16-2015, 05:45 PM   #11
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I have a DT 8.2 an AT 545 with an eaton rear with 6.50 gear's I have a lot of advice on how to get above 49 mph but no one will help with gear sizing and it is cheaper for me to buy the rear with the gear that I need! I have heard anything from 3/7 to 4/11?
86 ford Wayne full size. I have heard everything from start over to rip out motor to change tranny and I have been to eaton for the rear? Will anyone recommend a gear to change my rear to? Also even from eaton no one will talk to me about what rear is compatabile? The men 5-state's over will make recomendation's but won't finalize unless I bring the bus to them to evaluate? Hell all I want to do is go to texas from n.c. One time!!! just not at 49 mph? Any ideas or contacts!!!
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Old 05-16-2015, 05:56 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by austin1989us View Post
Thanks for the input guys. I think I'll pass on the gas bus. Using the assumed fuel prices and Tango's estimates I got about $1,000 more expensive per 2,500 miles driven with the gas bus. Using Cowlitz's more optimistic numbers it was more like $400. I'd venture to guess that the real number is somewhere between the two.

I'll keep looking.
I am from Kilgore,tx and played marine and the first bus I really wanted , really wanted was a chevy gasser with a 10- speed tranny and didn't get
Cause of gas price and the wife can drive stick but 10 of them was a NO after she pushed the pedal! Dang it ! I loved everything about it and could work on every part now I have one that is teaching me more than I am it
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Old 05-17-2015, 01:23 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
I have a DT 8.2 an AT 545 with an eaton rear with 6.50 gear's I have a lot of advice on how to get above 49 mph but no one will help with gear sizing and it is cheaper for me to buy the rear with the gear that I need! I have heard anything from 3/7 to 4/11?
86 ford Wayne full size. I have heard everything from start over to rip out motor to change tranny and I have been to eaton for the rear? Will anyone recommend a gear to change my rear to? Also even from eaton no one will talk to me about what rear is compatabile? The men 5-state's over will make recomendation's but won't finalize unless I bring the bus to them to evaluate? Hell all I want to do is go to texas from n.c. One time!!! just not at 49 mph? Any ideas or contacts!!!
Is that the DT530?

If so, I would chose anything 4.44 and up. So 4.44 would be good for hills and mountains, but the 3.54 will be better for flat ground.

Its too bad you have that AT545. That engine is soooo under tuned because of it. If it was a standard transmission, I would go 3.54 and turn the engine way up.

Nat
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Old 05-17-2015, 09:36 AM   #14
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The total cost calculation depends also on the purchase price, and how much you drive. If you are going across the country, there is no question that a diesel will have a lower total cost. If you only make two round trips per year to the lake that is 100 miles away, the fuel used driving 400 miles per year may not offset other costs. It may not pay to ignore a less desirable (and therefore cheaper?) gasser for limited driving.

We used to have a 1993 DT360 box truck with a 5-speed stick at work. I'm sorry I don't remember the fuel mileage, as I wasn't paying for the fuel.

The truck required patience to drive. At full throttle, it would merge into the Interstate driving lane at 35 MPH, coming out of a tight corner onto an uphill ramp. It took about 3 to 5 minutes to top out at 64 MPH on the level. In heavy traffic, you had to look about a mile down the interstate, and change lanes before you hit a slow-down, because if you took off speed it was going to take a long time to get it back.

That being said, it would not be a bad engine for relaxed exploration of 2-lane highways through rural America, but it is not a good choice for express cruising across endless prairie on an Interstate.

"You pays your money and you makes your choice."
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Old 05-17-2015, 12:49 PM   #15
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I have gotten 8-9 mpg on my bus, a 34' Thomas pusher, 21,000 lbs curb weight, with a Diesel CAT 3126 and Allison 5 speed. This is before I enabled the 6th gear which dropped engine speed at 65 by about 300 rpm. I haven't driven it enough with that having been done to get a measurement on fuel consumption after the trans reflash. The 8-9 mpg figure is with me doing 65 mph, pedal to the floor the entire time I am accelerating and cruising.

My last job we had 2010-2014 Chevy Express 3500-based 17' box trucks (dually) with a curb weight of 9500 when empty and max gvw of 12,700. Probably a less than a bus on the same chassis would weigh. We did pickups in DC, city traffic but were also on 95 a lot. They had chevy 6.0 V8s and 6 speed autos, and with 20-something males driving them they got 7-8 mpg consistently. Highway or city didn't seem to make much of a difference as they were constantly gear hunting on the highway and downshifting to 4th on a 1% grade due to the massively terrible aero of those trucks.

So figure a pretty new engine design (old school pushrod v8 but whatever) and a good 6 speed trans and geared for hwy use, which is like mechanically a best case scenario. Even then, it only got 7-8 mpg. I would figure a bus you're buying with a gas engine would be older and have a 4 speed and a chevy 350 or big block V8 that runs less efficiently and may have shorter gearing.

I'd skip out on the gasser, just my opinion.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:20 PM   #16
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The new GM 6.0L gas V-8's with 4L80 transmissions in the cut-away buses are turning into some fairly fuel efficient power packages.

My customers report they regularly get 10-12 MPG with them.

That is from daily school routes, daily shuttle routes in town, and dairly service routes going between towns.

If I was going to get a small Type 'A' school bus or light duty commercial bus on a cut-away chassis I would chose the GM chassis with the 6.0L before I would look at any Ford chassis and I would not chose a diesel in the light duty chassis.
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Old 08-03-2015, 04:22 AM   #17
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I got a triple 4/ 7.3l and i get 9.5 miles a gallon doing a max speed of 50mph. In metric thats 25l per 100 klicks doing 80 kph
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Old 08-07-2015, 01:39 PM   #18
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We all hate metric.

A friend calls the metric side of a tape measure the french side. Lol

Nat
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Old 08-07-2015, 02:30 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock649 View Post
I got a triple 4/ 7.3l and i get 9.5 miles a gallon doing a max speed of 50mph. In metric thats 25l per 100 klicks doing 80 kph
Odd. I've the same engine, and got about 10mpg with at 60-65; including about 45 minutes of creep on the Cross-Bronx in NYC at rush hour. And my Amtran's a huge brick (3000RE) with the aerodynamics of a strip mall
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Old 08-07-2015, 02:32 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
We all hate metric.

A friend calls the metric side of a tape measure the french side. Lol

Nat
Not me! I'd prefer the world be SI (metric) over the arbitrary measurements of the imperial system and the US system.. Making everything base 10 is much easier for conversions. The problem is that only 90% of the world has adopted it and us North Americans live in that weird 10%. We still have some industries holding out on the metric system even in Canada. Lumber, steel, etc are still measured in inches and feet. Grocery stores typically measure in both systems.

Formula to convert 2834 milligrams to grams (milli = 1/1000, or 0.001):
2834 milligrams / 1000 = 2.834 grams
OR
2834 milligrams * 0.001 = 2.834 grams

Formula to convert 2834 centimeters to meters (centi = 1/100, or 0.01):
2834 centimeters / 100 = 28.34 meters
OR
2834 centimeters * 0.01 = 28.34 meters

Formula to convert 2834 pounds to tons:
2834 pounds * 0.0005 = 1.417 tons

Formula to convert 2834 US fl. ounces to US gallons:
2834 fl. ounces * 0.0078125 = 22.14063 US gallons

Which ones can easily be done in the ol' noggin? Once you know the order of milli, centi, deci, deca, hecto, kilo, mega, giga, tera you're good to go. All base 10.
Most of you probably already know kilo, mega, giga, tera from the computer world.. Thats half way there!

Edit: Obligatory Oatmeal comic (he's American, btw )

http://theoatmeal.com/pl/senior_year/science
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