Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-08-2016, 01:30 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: shreveport, la
Posts: 100
How terrible of an idea is it to use wood instead of sheet metal?

As the title states.... I'm considering using wood instead of thin sheet metal on the bus sides, since I've raised the roof. Really just tossing the idea around so I though I'd ask opinions. It seems to me it would insulate better, and possibly be a little more sturdy? And of course, about 1/3rd the cost. However, it obviously wouldn't last as long. Thoughts?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
jbohall001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 02:31 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Garden State (rural NJ)
Posts: 383
Are you referring to the interior or exterior sides?

Wood is traditionally used extensively on the interior (walls, ceiling and sometimes floor) of skoolie conversions. As for the exterior, I'll let others debate the the merits. I want my skoolie to be as low maintenance as possible.
BusFiend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 02:33 PM   #3
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: shreveport, la
Posts: 100
Sorry. Exterior walls. I was thinking something like birch. Light and deals with water very well.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
jbohall001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 04:24 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kansas
Posts: 430
Year: 2000
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: Your mom +1
I would stay away from wood on the outside. The outer skins of the bus actually contribute to the rigidity of the structure of the bus itself. I know its more expensive to use sheet metal, but in the long run it is worth it. I used 16 gauge and my bus is rock solid after a roof raise. It will be much more durable in the long run as well, I.E. less maintenance/upkeep/headaches. After doing it with sheet metal I would NEVER recommend using wood instead.
slaughridge85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 04:29 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: shreveport, la
Posts: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by slaughridge85 View Post
I would stay away from wood on the outside. The outer skins of the bus actually contribute to the rigidity of the structure of the bus itself. I know its more expensive to use sheet metal, but in the long run it is worth it. I used 16 gauge and my bus is rock solid after a roof raise. It will be much more durable in the long run as well, I.E. less maintenance/upkeep/headaches. After doing it with sheet metal I would NEVER recommend using wood instead.
Well that's where I'm kind of hung up at. How much of the outer skin really is structural at this point? I cut my window posts and welded in steel tubing. Structurally speaking, it should be solid. 20 gauge steel is about 48 pounds per sheet, wood is about 12. Etc etc. I'm just going over it in my head lol. I mean, people have been building things from wood along time before steel. I dunno. Thanks for your input!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
jbohall001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 04:33 PM   #6
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kansas
Posts: 430
Year: 2000
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: Your mom +1
No doubt wood has been used much longer. But, how many old wooden structures have you seen living life going down the highway at 65mph for an extended period of time? Road vibration is a killer.
slaughridge85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 04:33 PM   #7
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: shreveport, la
Posts: 100
Oooohhh that's true.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
jbohall001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 05:26 PM   #8
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 4,289
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
road vibration and wood is tough to seal agaibst metal so getting water in seems likely at some point.. the thinner the wood the tougher its going to be to get it to last... its going to want to warp and roll...

I think it could be done if you are completely anal about upkeep of the finish on it and made sure every rock chip or ding was repaired immediately as far as touching up whatever varnish you used.. and then you would have to be good about predicting wind direction over your bus as you flashed and sealed the wood where it meets metal.. (the wind doesnt always travel front to back...)..


-Christopher
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2016, 02:08 AM   #9
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 657
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Even with cut posts for windows spanning one or more ribs, the exterior sheet provides significant shear strength to the structure.

Make a 12 inch square from some sticks, tape a layer of tissue paper to the frame, then skew the frame. Paper tears in the middle.

Do the same with a layer of commercial aluminum foil. It will take more effort to rupture the metal sheet on frame.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbohall001 View Post
Well that's where I'm kind of hung up at. How much of the outer skin really is structural at this point? I cut my window posts and welded in steel tubing. Structurally speaking, it should be solid. 20 gauge steel is about 48 pounds per sheet, wood is about 12. Etc etc. I'm just going over it in my head lol. I mean, people have been building things from wood along time before steel. I dunno. Thanks for your input!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2016, 11:44 AM   #10
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: shreveport, la
Posts: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb View Post
Even with cut posts for windows spanning one or more ribs, the exterior sheet provides significant shear strength to the structure.

Make a 12 inch square from some sticks, tape a layer of tissue paper to the frame, then skew the frame. Paper tears in the middle.

Do the same with a layer of commercial aluminum foil. It will take more effort to rupture the metal sheet on frame.
That's true... I didn't even think about that. Well hell guess the bus is gonna have to chill a while.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
jbohall001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.