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Old 06-19-2016, 09:34 PM   #11
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All that is really necessary is the transfer of heat into the air. There are two types of intercoolers...air to air...and ...air to water to air. Either will provide a significant benefit if designed and installed correctly. One thing to watch for is maintaining the proper pressure. A poorly designed intercooler will create too much pressure drop in the system.
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:30 AM   #12
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My advice is to not bother with passive cooling of the intercooler, and instead use a hydraulic or electric fan configuration most rear engine intercoolers are installed with. Or PTO/belt.

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Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
Hello All;
I'm looking at my next step which is installing a Intercooler on my 8.3 Cummins that's installed in my Crown Pusher. One thought I have is building a scoop out of Fiberglass that starts at the roof with a intake that's about 8 inches high & say 3 ft wide that tapers down to about 2ft wide at the bottom, the scoop could run down the back of the bus & stop just above the cooling vents for the eng compartment. My thought process here is ,Positive Air Pressure scooped up at top of bus & as it narrows increases pressure in front of Intercooler but negative air pressure at exit of scoop because it would be down in vacuum area behind bus would pull air thru.

option 2; Mount a box or cooler inside eng compartment install Intercooler inside then when traveling fill box/cooler with water & a couple slabs of dry ice.
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Old 06-20-2016, 10:48 AM   #13
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if the idea of a snorkel isfor a higher pressure air charge going in.. just install a bigger turbo if you (and your engine can take it) want more boost...

mist "intercoolers" are actually After-coolers.. and will cool the air POST turbo, from what ive seen a fan other than the engine fan on an aftercooler is wasted.. theres enough metal mass in the cooler itself to take up the heat produced during an initial spool up... long hard turbo pulls are generally accompanied by enough physical speed (or a hot engine therefor engine fan engagement) to keep the air charge cool..

I had never seen a turbo engine without a cooler.. were there some busses that didnt have stock after coolers?

-Christopher
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Old 06-20-2016, 11:20 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
if the idea of a snorkel isfor a higher pressure air charge going in.. just install a bigger turbo if you (and your engine can take it) want more boost...

mist "intercoolers" are actually After-coolers.. and will cool the air POST turbo, from what ive seen a fan other than the engine fan on an aftercooler is wasted.. theres enough metal mass in the cooler itself to take up the heat produced during an initial spool up... long hard turbo pulls are generally accompanied by enough physical speed (or a hot engine therefor engine fan engagement) to keep the air charge cool..

I had never seen a turbo engine without a cooler.. were there some busses that didnt have stock after coolers?

-Christopher
Mine does not have a cooler.
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Old 06-20-2016, 01:37 PM   #15
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Actually, there are quite a few turbo-diesels out there sans intercooler. But, they are much less efficient. My diesel shop put the difference at about 15% less hp & torque as well as consuming more fuel.
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Old 06-20-2016, 01:48 PM   #16
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I never realized that so many existed on commercial trucks anyway... there were a lot of turbo cars made without coolers.. I do know with airflow in general the more twists / bends / elbows you put in the pipe to route to any sort of cooler you are losing CFM of of flow and velocity... at some point theres a tradeoff between plumbing to heck and back for a cooler vs running no coller at all..

I dont know much about these engies to know if turbo boost is waste-gate limited or if boost is limited on the front end by how much fool is allowed to enter the engine... if the objective is just to gain a little more power.. then perhaps you turn up the Juice a little...

-Christopher
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:13 PM   #17
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The advantage provided by a CAC (Charge Air Cooler...aka; "intercooler") is that when properly designed, there is only about 1-2% pressure loss, but the cooled air is much denser. More oxygen available, which translates into a significant power gain. When I raced 2-stoke formula bikes, the available power difference between a hot summer day and a chilly fall day was at once noticeable and impressive with the same jetting and tune. Noticed the same thing in flying small aerobatic planes. Since there is a 3 degree drop in temperature per every 1,000 foot in altitude, the plane had way more power at around 5 to 7 thousand feet than near the ground on a hot, sticky day. Above that altitude and you begin getting into thinner air and the gain goes back away.

Fat air is good air for engines.
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:24 PM   #18
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oh I get it as far as why you want a cooler.. I used to run drag cars and always had to dial in based on weather... I loved the spring because the sun angle was high (warm track) and cold air in the morning... im just saying that if a charge cooler is added to this bus and the ducting is so elaborate that it twists and turns the air so much you end up with little to no benefit over stock... if a fairly clear route can be made from turb to cooler and from cooler to engine then I say its worth adding...
-Christopher
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:28 PM   #19
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So to avoid pressure drop, the pipe off the turbo is 2 1/2in would I increase the inlet & outlet of the cooler to 3in then drop back to 2 1/2in or kept 3in all the way back to the intake then drop back to 2 1/2.??
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Old 06-20-2016, 03:21 PM   #20
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Quote:
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So what do you think of the idea of a Intercooler Immersed in water & ice for traveling days??
I doubt that would work. The amount of heat energy that you would be dealing with is quite a bit. I don't think you'd want to deal with that much cooler space. Although dry ice is a wonderful cooling mechanism, I doubt it would work well with water in a cooler. Plus you'll always have to be near a place with dry ice then. If you're not wanting to do the duct work to make an intercooler work, then perhaps a better idea would be one of the air to water charge coolers(if they make one big enough) and then run a separate radiator up front with the associated hose and pump.
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