Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-22-2006, 11:24 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
vonslatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 177
Leaking differential . . .

Hi everyone,

My rear-end's input shaft seal has developed a leak. There was no sign of a leak when I parked the bus last fall and I drove the bus just a couple of times in January when we had car trouble.

Here is a picture of the leak:



I've got a 1977 manual for Eaton EA-104 truck axles which appear very similar if not identical to what I have in my '89. The repair looks pretty straight forward but I have a couple of questions for you guys:

1) I'm planning a trip next month, about 300 miles round trip. I plan to have this leak fixed before then, if I don't get to it should I cancel the trip?

2) Where can I order a seal online? for that matter, is there a good all-round online source for bus parts?

Cheers!

Jake.
__________________
My 1989 Thomas Saf-T-Liner
vonslatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 12:09 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
frank-id's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Twin Falls, Idaho
Posts: 808
Rear end pinion seal leak

My advice to you would be...first check grease level in differential, then find the axle vent, and then take the bus for a 10-20 mile ride and park bus over a piece of cardboard. Check the cardboard for leaks every hout or 2 so as to establish the leak rate. The leak may actually cease and desist. The axle vent isa small tube on the top side of the axle tube to allow any pressure in housing to be relieved.
Installing a pinion seal on any big equipment is not for the average car guy. All the parts are expensive, heavy and requires some special tools. All the tools are large and are not usually found in a car mechanic's tool box. Also a torgue wrench should be used to check the big nut tightness. Buying big HD truck parts on line is not a great idea. Get friendly with a car or truck repair shop and buy locally for may reasons.
Looks like your bus has auto chains.... Frank
frank-id is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 12:42 PM   #3
Skoolie
 
vonslatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 177
Cool! I like the possibility that it might just fix itself, and if I'm able to monitor the level I have a lot better idea what I can risk.

BTW: there is no sign of any oil on the ground under the bus where it's sat for the last 6 weeks.

Thanks !

PS: I'm not your "average car guy" !
__________________
My 1989 Thomas Saf-T-Liner
vonslatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 01:24 PM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Central Iowa
Posts: 1,838
Send a message via AIM to Steve
The only big truck I am familiar with is my bus, so what are all those chains in your picture?
__________________
View my 1972 Ward: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
View my 1986 Blue Bird: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
View my 1960 GMC: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 01:32 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
vonslatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 177
Frank pointed those out, they are automatic tire chains. My bus came from the Hudson Valley area in NY where they have a lot of hills and get a lot of snow.

I haven't had a chance to try them out yet, I wonder if they work in sand . . .

Here's a picture that shows how they work:



there's a video at http://www.onspot.com/

I don't know if mine come from this company but they work the same way.

Jake.
__________________
My 1989 Thomas Saf-T-Liner
vonslatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 03:02 PM   #6
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Differentials are supposed to leak...that's how you know there's lube in them

That said...it doesn't look major to me. Look under just about any light duty truck on the road. I bet it leaks. 80w90 seems to have a way of making a big mess out of just a little bit of fluid. If the level seems ok and it doesn't appear to be leaking very fast, I wouldn't worry much about it. Just keep an eye on it. A leaking pinion seal is not nearly as destructive as say leaking axle seals which will quickly kill your shoes and even those aren't that big of a deal on anything with a full floating axle such as a bus because they leak well outside the brake drum in most cases.

Just my $.02
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 08:46 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
I lvoe instachains! They work great in snow....but not as good as real tire chains. The fact you can turn them on/off from the cab of the vehicle while driving down the road makes them far more convienent than real tire chains.

I don't think they would be adventagous in sand.....
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Differential ratio - 99 Bluebird/ International frank-id International | Navistar Drivetrain 2 07-26-2011 01:21 PM
Figuring out which differential gear ratio is right for you Jive Turkey Conversion Tutorials and How-to's 4 06-17-2011 05:23 PM
Leaking Rain Through the Walls M1031 Conversion General Discussions 2 06-14-2010 08:14 AM
a/c freon leaking minibusser2 Everything Else | General Skoolie Discussions 2 08-23-2006 08:59 AM
bus differential Brian Conversion General Discussions 4 06-22-2005 11:39 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.