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Old 07-09-2016, 10:02 PM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
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almost the exact same bus as mine... rust, yes. and I am having a blast converting it. LOTS of work but I am ok with that!!
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:34 PM   #12
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As one who is still in the process of converting a rusty school bus let me say this: your time will be better spent on a less rusty bus.
I see a number of troubling things with that bus. The lower rear panels have holes rusted right through them. There is a 90% chance that there is fiberglass insulation behind that panel, which will have absorbed the road salt water like a sponge and rusted all sorts of structural members back there.
I can also see rust poking through the skin around the wheel well. Thats a big problem. There are likely holes all around there and it's a difficult location to seal properly. To properly fix that you'll need to remove the rub rails and put new sheet metal in, then deal with the wheel hump.
Is travelling south for a bus an option?
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Old 07-10-2016, 09:30 PM   #13
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Hi and welcome!

I was just about to share a long post about my lack of concern for rust when a bug flew into my mouth. How strange. I spit it out but can still taste something odd. Poor little guy, probably smelled the lemon juice and thought it was a...?

I dont mind rust. The short version.

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Old 07-10-2016, 09:47 PM   #14
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I see major rust issues with that bus. The short of it is this: You're likely to spend several thousand dollars and many hours of time fixing and replacing everything to get it in roadworthy condition. You would be far better off finding a Kentucky or Tennessee or other rust-free bus for a thousand or 2 more, with no rust to fix. Belly storage, while nice, can be retrofitted, air brakes are also a nice option (no, you should not need a CDL in an RV).

As a buyer, I would want to know what engine it has and mileage, a VIN would be an acceptable substitute as much info can be pulled using it.

My take? If you *REALLY* plan to scrap much of the body and rebuilt it from scratch, or cannibalize it for parts, this is a good candidate. Otherwise, keep lookin'. I'd buy it for parts, myself, if I had the extra $$ laying around.
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Old 07-10-2016, 09:49 PM   #15
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I think rust has to be looked at in different scenerios..

1. rust on durface panels is a weld and rivet fix.. its not like a clasic show car where tyou have to make a mirror shine.. you cut out the panel, make a new one add some sealant and riveit it on...

STRUCTURAL rust I would have concern with... are your ribs riusted through underneath... does the frame and under-body components such as air-tanks, suspension pieces, brake fittings and lines, transmission lines, etc show significant rust damage? if so then that bus is a no...

for me I just fix stuff as I find it wrong... My bus isnt a fancy motorhome conversion... its a driver... I drive my friends to dinner in it.. I get groceries in it.. I run it on long roadtrips, O use it as a Dev Lab, I sometimes go to my office in it.. while I do store my bus under roof so it stays dry.. I dont fret about running it through a rainstorm either... whuich means things are likely to rust at some point....

if you are building a pristine RV or a House then i'd probably pay more attention to rust since its likely to sit alot.. outside where you want to make sure its 112% sealed tight..

-Christopher
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Old 07-11-2016, 02:10 AM   #16
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I have to join the "no" camp. There's a lot of rust showing on that bottom rub rail, and that's some serious rust across the entire bottom of the back of the bus. I'd also be wary of what the underside of that bus looks like.

There's a reason its so cheap, and theyre even telling you- "Age & Body Condition"
- or, "its old n' rusty."

To me, I'd rather spend my time on the conversion rather then fixing rusty bodywork. Its also something you HAVE to fix - because those rusty spots will let water in, and un-do the hard work you do on the inside of the bus.
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Old 07-11-2016, 06:04 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad_SwiftFur View Post
I see major rust issues with that bus. The short of it is this: You're likely to spend several thousand dollars and many hours of time fixing and replacing everything to get it in roadworthy condition. You would be far better off finding a Kentucky or Tennessee or other rust-free bus for a thousand or 2 more, with no rust to fix. Belly storage, while nice, can be retrofitted, air brakes are also a nice option (no, you should not need a CDL in an RV).

As a buyer, I would want to know what engine it has and mileage, a VIN would be an acceptable substitute as much info can be pulled using it.

My take? If you *REALLY* plan to scrap much of the body and rebuilt it from scratch, or cannibalize it for parts, this is a good candidate. Otherwise, keep lookin'. I'd buy it for parts, myself, if I had the extra $$ laying around.
KY buses go cheap. No ports for the exporters.
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Old 07-11-2016, 08:35 AM   #18
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Hello PoolRoom!

I hope all is well! Thank you for your reply; and workman's enthusiasm towards taking on a rust repair project! I've never been one to shy away from extra work; especially if the extra work helps strengthen a skill set I have. However, time is of the essence with this conversion so to speak; so based on the perspectives of some of our skoolie.net peers, I may be leaning towards spending some extra money to obtain a bus with little to no rust. I do commend you on your conversion project; as I definitely understand and value the feeling of accomplishment that follow any "repair & renew" project! Keep restoring!

Best Regards,

Mr. Neal
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Old 07-11-2016, 08:47 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
As one who is still in the process of converting a rusty school bus let me say this: your time will be better spent on a less rusty bus.
I see a number of troubling things with that bus. The lower rear panels have holes rusted right through them. There is a 90% chance that there is fiberglass insulation behind that panel, which will have absorbed the road salt water like a sponge and rusted all sorts of structural members back there.
I can also see rust poking through the skin around the wheel well. Thats a big problem. There are likely holes all around there and it's a difficult location to seal properly. To properly fix that you'll need to remove the rub rails and put new sheet metal in, then deal with the wheel hump.
Is travelling south for a bus an option?
Hello Jazty!

I hope all is well! Thank you for your reply! I definitely value your feedback; especially considering you're through the doorway of taking on a project I'm merely considering at this point. You definitely made some very solid points; many of which I'd had in mind prior to your post. However, there's occasional periods in life where a secondary perspective, that confirms something you'd already been thinking, nudges you into making the best decision when gridlocked between very valid and reasonable concepts/approaches. I'm a project seeker; but time is a factor here. So reaching a common medium between the two seems to be the best case scenario. Thank you!

-Mr. Neal
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Old 07-11-2016, 08:52 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carytowncat View Post
Hi and welcome!

I was just about to share a long post about my lack of concern for rust when a bug flew into my mouth. How strange. I spit it out but can still taste something odd. Poor little guy, probably smelled the lemon juice and thought it was a...?

I dont mind rust. The short version.

Hello Carytowncat!

I hope all is well! Thank you for your response! I don't mind us being rust bus buddy's; but hopefully there's not any bug/mouth casualties involved! (Smiles) Thank you for your reply!

-Mr. Neal
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