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Old 09-01-2016, 04:28 PM   #21
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Yes, EGT would be higher than expected. But you don't know baseline because you never knew what temps it was like with known good injectors. The correctly equipped shop can check for HC emissions on a dyno, but now you're getting into spending money.

Are there any service records?

One side effect of incorrectly advanced timing is white smoke when cold. It's hard to quantify, but another side effect is more power at high engine speeds, but that's really dependent on the type of pump and governor.




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Originally Posted by bread519 View Post
If the timing was incorrect would I have any side affects? The rig seems to have power to spare but I've also never driven any other buses
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:23 PM   #22
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No smoke at all from the bus really. I've been super busy this past few weeks and haven't had a chance to look into it yet. I need to do some research about checking the injectors then I'll probably tackle. I do have a camping trip this weekend with it.
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Old 09-13-2016, 10:39 PM   #23
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Update

So I took the bus into the local truck stop. My "water transfer"? filter was old. I have two bad tires. One was at 60psi, the other was at 70psi.


Could this be my culprit
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Old 09-13-2016, 11:30 PM   #24
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Yeah, those tires sound to be way underinflated.

On 20" or 22.5" tires, my company considers them *FLAT* at anything under 85.
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:00 AM   #25
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if theres water in the fuel that can cause a skip or miss which will make your fuel comnsumption higher in general..

underinflated tires will definitely be a cause for Low MPG..
my bus runs its tires at 100 PSI cold.. and your truck stop probably tested them at 60 and 70 Hot! (opressures read higher when tires are hot).. and thoise tires wouldve been pretty warm after driving them at that pressure..

-Christopher
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:09 AM   #26
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While 60psi is certainly low, 70psi may be getting close to the recommended pressure, depending on what tires you have and the vehicle weight.

Check out these tire load and inflation tables from Michelin: Load & Inflation Tables | Michelin Truck.

If you look at a G-rated 11r22.5 you can see that the recommended PSI for an axle with singles that is supporting up to 9060lbs is 70psi. 100psi supports up to 11900lbs for an axle with singles. I would wager that few buses have 11900lbs resting on those front wheels. Over inflation will result in reduced traction and increased wear of the center tread.

Also note that most buses have a plaque somewhere (mine was in the fire extinguisher compartment) that will display recommended tire inflation for front and rear wheels.

My tires are 10r22.5 and I shoot for 75psi. At 100psi the wheels provide a harsher ride and have less traction.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:28 AM   #27
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each tire brand and model is different too... the uniroyals im running, are a higher load rating and the tire guys recommended running 100..

I went wit ha Load range H instead of the 'F' the bus previously had simply because i was into very standard truck tires that offered me all kinds of different choices and better prices.

for me it was pretty easy since I went in shopping for 6 new tires we could match up a nice set of 4 for the back and then a different but best fit for the 2 in the front...

I havenbt played around with my pressures as im still learnign the ins and outs of commercial truck tires


-Christopher
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:45 AM   #28
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The recommended inflation should be stamped on the tire. My old ones ran at 125psi and the new ones (as I recall) are about 90-100.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:50 AM   #29
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The recommended inflation should be stamped on the tire. My old ones ran at 125psi and the new ones (as I recall) are about 90-100.
That's usually the maximum pressure, from my experience. The recommended tire pressure needs to be calculated per vehicle: https://www.yokohamatruck.com/commer...ure-calculator
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:51 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
the uniroyals im running, are a higher load rating and the tire guys recommended running 100..
While a higher load rated tire means you can support more load and run it at a higher pressure there is still good reason to keep the pressure matched to your vehicles weight. Evenness of wear and ride quality are the two big reasons to figure out a proper inflation.

While inflation and load rating for commercial truck tires differ between manufacturers, they really don't differ by a wide margin. Standard truck tires have been mostly... ahem.. standardized ;).

I would trust the plaque that the vehicle manufacturer put inside the vehicle more than the tire salesman. The salesmen know the tires, but they don't know the vehicle. A quick cross-reference from any of the commercial tire inflation tables could help out, even if you changed tire sizes.

For instance if the vehicle information plaque recommends 10r22.5 tires inflated to 80psi for the front axle you can look at a table and see that the front axle is supporting something around 9000lbs. Move to the 11r22.5s and to support around 9000lbs you need somewhere between 70-75psi...

Just sharing what I've learned! It has helped me with ride quality considerably
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