Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-02-2015, 01:21 PM   #1
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,520
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Opinions Desired

Ok I'm going to stretch a bit and say this is Skoolie related because it's taking me away from working on my project so here it goes.

I'm putting in new house windows in a couple weeks & redoing the siding, instead of taking down the old siding what if I treated it with copper green then installed new shiplap type siding on top of it? would that give me a little more of a thermal break?

Thanks for you input,, Stuart
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0308.jpg (245.2 KB, 2 views)
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2015, 10:34 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Upstate NY (Mohawk Valley)
Posts: 1,096
Covering over old siding is nothing new. Decades ago it was asphalt or masonry tiles over clapboards, then post-WWII it was aluminum siding. More recently it has been plastic siding, and now it is plastic clapboards with foam insulation pre-filled in the voids in back.

I'm not familiar with what copper green is, but I'm guessing it is some kind of fungicide?
__________________
Someone said "Making good decisions comes from experience, experience comes from bad decisions." I say there are three kinds of people: those who learn from their mistakes, those who learn from the mistakes of others, and those who never learn.
Redbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 01:31 AM   #3
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Currently in Appalachia.
Posts: 148
There's quite a few informational documents on buildingscience dot com.
Click on their information link then search by topic. They have several "build" threads of building remodels for energy efficiency.

Your attachment method would vary depending on the permeability of your layers. You don't want to sandwich anything between two impermeable layers that don't 'breathe.' Moisture/vapor needs to be able to get out of a 'sandwich' from at least one direction. Sometimes that is done by using furring to create a gap so moisture doesn't stay in contact with the two surfaces when the outside layer is not 100% waterproof.
__________________
~Pamela
SassyLass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 07:09 AM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Upstate NY (Mohawk Valley)
Posts: 1,096
Pamela, Thanks for the reference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SassyLass View Post
. . Sometimes that is done by using furring to create a gap . . .
You will notice that the existing wall is board-and-batten. No need for furring strips, the battens in place already provide that gap. That is what was in my mind, but then I don't know if Stuart was thinking of stripping them off. I wasn't.
__________________
Someone said "Making good decisions comes from experience, experience comes from bad decisions." I say there are three kinds of people: those who learn from their mistakes, those who learn from the mistakes of others, and those who never learn.
Redbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 03:25 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Currently in Appalachia.
Posts: 148
You're welcome!

One thing I did see in that site was the necessity to include a barrier for bugs should you use the furring method. There's a sheet called "foam shrinks" that has a link to a magazine article, with several pics and diagrams that detail the rebuild (16 years later) of a super insulated house that used the furring method. Great info in that article about what worked and didn't work, including carpenter ant barriers, and how they potentially get in and make a home.
__________________
~Pamela
SassyLass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 05:48 PM   #6
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 258
I don't want to get into a discussion about the pros and cons of insecticides... But since the topic is about ants it may be worth noting that Termidor (Fipronil) is now sprayed here in the US in many homes in the South as a proactive deterrent for both ants and termites.

When sprayed into a wall cavity it's a lot safer than applied externally (it's non-volatile so humans aren't exposed, and because you aren't having to spray it on the outside of the wall, neither are good insects like bees, which we don't want to kill). This application is supposedly good for literally _20 years_ from a single treatment so it's cheap and effective.

You make your own decision about whether you trust the use of these things. However, I recently had a home sprayed by a professional exterminator, and I can tell you it was incredibly effective. It was done 3 years ago and we had a number of very bad infestations in a property I had just bought. In CT, we get ants everywhere in the state - it's just a spring nuisance throughout the state. But we have had 0 ants to this day, despite not being re-treated, and despite living deep in the woods. There are active ant colonies within 25' of the house. But none inside.

I have 0 doubt that it would be equally effective inside a bus wall cavity. You decide what to do with that information. Personally, I've never had ants in my camper and don't view this as a problem that needs solving - but maybe folks who live longer in one spot in areas with more active ant issues might?

Please be responsible. I have no idea what the laws are on this world-wide so if you're going to be traveling maybe it's worth checking into?
taskswap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 09:41 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
I don't do chemicals.

That's why I'm building a metal home. No wood.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2015, 11:30 PM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,520
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbear View Post
Pamela, Thanks for the reference.
You will notice that the existing wall is board-and-batten. No need for furring strips, the battens in place already provide that gap. That is what was in my mind, but then I don't know if Stuart was thinking of stripping them off. I wasn't.
I'm planning on leaving them up,

Stuart
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.